Jump to content
Grunticus

Revell 1/32 Me262 A1 / A2 (kit 03875 of 2019)

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

CUqvoO9.jpg

 

Having focussed on Dutch military aviation for quite a few years with my modelling, I recently developed an interest in late-war German aircraft and other WW2 stuff. When I saw this new-tool 262 was available for € 30 in a modelling shop in Düsseldorf, I bought one (together with a ZM D0-335 A-12 and Revell He-162). I'm a bit late with a build thread since I am already well into construction. It will be finished as per the box-art, albeit with a different Werksnummer as I learned the one on the decal sheet in incorrect. Many thanks to Jennings Heilig for taking time to help me out and even provide a DXF file with the correct serial number 170061 so I can cut it with my Silhouette cutter.

 

The kit is very well detailed (especially for the price) and fit generally is good to very good so far. The exception to that is the gun cover door. I will display one of the two open and separated the panel with no problems. Getting it to fit in the opening however, is another story. The part is narrower than the opening by about 1.5 mm, and it's shape is warped compared to the fuselage shape. I had to battle it into position, which took me three attempts and two day. This because it would keep popping open. For now, it seems I finally got it, using stretched sprue, thin cement, Surfacer 500, and one pound of elbow-grease:

 

dlfLr86.jpg

 

The level of detail is quite satisfactory:

 

YrUn7uH.jpg?1

 

I tried some re-scribing using a new set of tools I bought a while ago. Looking all right. I will be re-scribing various details on this one.

 

5C88Nsn.jpg?1

 

This is what the ' natural' fit of the wing root looked like (all sorted now):

 

VLN6GUA.jpg?1

 

I started on the landing gear as well. I will add details to the main gear legs myself. No one could accuse the Germans of designing flimsy landing gears :o) The gear on this kit seems very sturdy. More pics next time.

 

emIUwXZ.jpg?1

 

The instrument panel that comes with the kit. Not bad at all. For the He-162 I got a Yahu example which looks really lovely.

 

WItaC3O.jpg?1

 

 

Edited by Grunticus
Google Drive images not working, changed to Imgur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work so far!  I have to admit, this kit does look rather nice. Ive got the Trumpy version, and if I didnt have that and a Me 262 A-1a/U4 conversion for it, Id probably be picking this kit up for sure.

 

Looking forward to more! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work. Yes this and the B both have the same issue with the gun covers. Like you it took much wrestling to get them closed up then multiple sanding to fair in on my build. 

 

Look forward to the next update.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice work on the 262 kit!  I've done the Trumpy kit and had some issues with the nose panels.  I was hoping that a new tool Revell kit would improve that situation but it looks like it has similar problems in this area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tody I worked on the wheels and seams. The wheel were weathered with that powder my girlfriend, uhm..rejuvinates her skin with. Worked reasonably well, and smells much better that Mr. Surfacer! Anyhow, it's not perfect, but practice will eventually make it that.

 

gs6WnyS.jpg?1

 

I also sprayed the seams with Surfacer 1000. As convinced I was they were okay, Surfacer always reveals flaws. Not at all too shabby, but: work to do! I also need to get a better hang of that scribing, results are mediocre so far.

 

CckTTeN.jpg

wJV0iEF.jpg?1

W7WbZiw.jpg?1

C0NIwdp.jpg?1

gFsI8Fl.jpg?1

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Engines were next, and I added some detail do the gear (still needs touching-up). The nacelles parts fit quite well, but, you need to apply pressure in the right places and the right manner for a longer period to get them to stay that way. In the end they came out okay. Below the laundry-pin applies outward pressure, so reverse use of the pin.

 

KFffPfg.jpg

 

The nacelles cleaned up fine with very minor use of putty and fit nicely onto the wings. Minor sanding is required to make the back-end snap in to place. Primed up to check more seams:

NUvv7vO.jpg?1

 

Brake-lines added to the main wheels and nose gear. Quite a prominent and worthwhile feature to add. The main gear will also receive them:

 

kc8TOiV.jpg?1

u5gekq8.jpg?1

 

Breaking news: In WWII decal setting solution was not always used, and he's clearly p*ssed off about it. Take that, IPMS judges! :D

 

CgBRewX.jpg?1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

For filling and then scribing, the most important thing is to have a uniform surface, and overlaid fillers of whatever chemistry just can't do it in my experience. If you look at professionals who produce outstanding scribed detail work, like Chris at Zacto Models for example, they'll produce a complete 100% resin piece then scribe it exquisitely as the material is 100% consistent and predictable.

 

The most satisfactory and consistent method I've found after decades on regular plastic models is the use cyano thick or thin depending on the application. The cannon bay doors would only require the thin type. I don't use any accelerator, so when building up layers if required, I'll wet sand the area. The water and the sanding slurry help set the glue.

 

The important step is to wet sand, level and rescribe the cyano filled areas within minutes. The glue sets to the same consistency as the plastic and remains soft and scribes cleanly for a short time, i.e. about 10 minutes or less. After that - or if accelerator is used -  it fully cures and is very hard and brittle, and scribing will cause edges of your new lines to chip and flake. If what you're doing can't be all done within that time window, then work on smaller areas as you go.

 

There is never a problem with feathering in edges or lifting or peeling and it's very manageable if worked within the time constraints. The technique works on plastic -plastic joins, resin-plastic joins and adding fillets to PE if required. Different brands may well work to slightly different timings, but that's a case of learning about your brand through trial and error before continuing.

 

Looking forward to your build as I have Revell's single and two seat versions to build at some point.

Edited by Chek
spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was already having a bad day, and it became worse. As I picked up the model something rattled. At first I thought it was the lead fishing weight in the nose that had come loose. But....no. The aft turbine blade that is also the backing plate for the onion shaped cone came loose and there was no way I could re-attach it from the outside. Breaking off the nacelle wouldn't work as I had taken care to glue the mating surfaces very thourgoughly (something I obviously neglected to do wit the turbine).

 

iUfp5Xg.jpg?1

 

All right. Out with the dremel, and create a new undocumented access-hatch so I can re-attach the blade:

 

EoJ3nQf.jpg?2

 

I Inserted some tabs which I will leave to dry for a day. After that I will add crossed internal braces made from sprue gate as well so I can man-handle the seams with putty and sand them smooth again.

 

OJV5m5P.jpg?1

 

Also, and I am almost too imbarrassed to write this, as I was about to cut plastic my son entered the room with a queery and I turned around to listen. After he left I turned to the model and started cutting THE WRONG NACELLE...:shrug: Luckily not all of it, simple fix.

 

Notes to others:

1. Place braces made from sprue gates between the front and aft turbine blade to prevent this (if like here there is no engine inside)

2. The onion shapes nozzle can easily be glued in after the nacelles are closed up as opposed to before closing them. They stick out a bit and placing them afterwards pevents you knocking them against something, plus it eases masking off the exhausts for painting.

 

Note to self:

On bad days stay away from the modelling room.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/27/2020 at 5:58 PM, Chek said:

For filling and then scribing, the most important thing is to have a uniform surface, and overlaid fillers of whatever chemistry just can't do it in my experience. If you look at professionals who produce outstanding scribed detail work, like Chris at Zacto Models for example, they'll produce a complete 100% resin piece then scribe it exquisitely as the material is 100% consistent and predictable.

 

The most satisfactory and consistent method I've found after decades on regular plastic models is the use cyano thick or thin depending on the application. The cannon bay doors would only require the thin type. I don't use any accelerator, so when building up layers if required, I'll wet sand the area. The water and the sanding slurry help set the glue.

 

The important step is to wet sand, level and rescribe the cyano filled areas within minutes. The glue sets to the same consistency as the plastic and remains soft and scribes cleanly for a short time, i.e. about 10 minutes or less. After that - or if accelerator is used -  it fully cures and is very hard and brittle, and scribing will cause edges of your new lines to chip and flake. If what you're doing can't be all done within that time window, then work on smaller areas as you go.

 

There is never a problem with feathering in edges or lifting or peeling and it's very manageable if worked within the time constraints. The technique works on plastic -plastic joins, resin-plastic joins and adding fillets to PE if required. Different brands may well work to slightly different timings, but that's a case of learning about your brand through trial and error before continuing.

 

Looking forward to your build as I have Revell's single and two seat versions to build at some point.

 

Thanks a lot for this. Wet sanding with not completely set superglue should indeed help with creating predictable behaviour when scbribing due to the amalgan sawdust / glue composition. I will give this method a try on a scrap piece and report back for advice should it be needed. So far, I get best result using a micro saw instead of a scriber. But I now it can be done, I just have to practice and learn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

After looking a a few reference photos I decided that the main gear damper is a tad too long in appearance. So I cat the damper off and shortened it by about 2mm.

g1MpWGn.jpg?1

 

The originl length vs a shortened one. Reinforcing was done with pieces of thicker paperclip.

 

hwfajSv.jpg?1

 

I have been using @Thunnus 's build of his excellent Trumpeter Me-262 very informative and truly inspiring to me. After looking at that again I felt I was cutting corners here and there. For this reason I rewired the nose gear with some thicker wire (a single UTP cable vain). Thanks for your inspiration John!

H1kQtUs.jpg

dhnKZWu.jpg?1

 

Below is the way it looked before.Much better above IMHO.

 

kc8TOiV.jpg?1

 

While looking at the drill shavings I wondered if they make into decent scale-cable bundles. I shall be trying this out soon. In the magnification below they don't look to great, but one-to-one they seem to give a good effect.

 

011WOad.jpg?1

 

 

 

Edited by Grunticus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shortening the landing gear means the scissors are now too extended to fit naturally. So, let's shorten them. Why not make them variable while I'm at it.

 

First I separated the two legs by cutting in the knee-joint with a micro-saw, enough so the rounded part was completely through. Then I cut both half circles from the side so that each leg had one attached.

KVV1CPI.jpg

 

 Next holes were drilled for an axle to pass through.

 

tbYB9bm.jpg?1

 

I used a solid-copper UTP vain as an axle.

 

PaTecvV.jpg?1 

 

Now, the width of the scissor can be set to anything.

 

obb0BEQ.jpg?1

 

Test fit after securing arms and axle with superglue. Cleanup, fitting of hydraulic lines and repaint are next.

 

E53zkfV.jpg?1

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thank you Mark! My little disaster is getting near healing. A bit more Surfacer to apply here and there, and sanding to do.

 

lAkTZjc.jpg?1

 

I have prepared the two brake lines made from solder wire and utp wire insulation cut to disks serve as fasteners. I gave them a coat of Surfacer and then RLM 66.

 

m7Nxbcs.jpg?1

 

eBScxt3.jpg?1

 

Doesn't look too shabby IRL. I think I will reduce the weathering a tiny bit and give the gear legs a coat of semi-gloss to even-out the appearance. Or matt?

 

1ebh9QX.jpg?1

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Grunticus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the reasons I have never liked to display hatches in the open position was that I always thought the thickness looked too much out of scale. I had already decided to display one gun hatch in the open position on the Schwalbe, but looking at the kit part I thought it would look like a safe-door on an aircraft. I also found the ribbing on the Revell part a bit understated, and there is no defined bulge on the inside surface. So out with the ole empty beer can, and cut a new door.

 

rg2neWh.jpg?1

 

Next I cut narrow strips and other bits of beer can and applied them. The end result was.........wel wasn't. So in to te bin with this one:

 

keWbh2O.jpg?1

 

This had been nothing but a fun intermezzo until now, but now I wanted a new door that looked good. I cut a new one and started adding the ribbing, this time using styrene evergreen strip I had, but cut in half length-wise to get the correct width. While researching this I found there were many variations in how much ribbing there was and where it was positioned. I chose this one:

 

2P8sgpY.jpg?1

 

The bulge was embossed with the back of a paintbrush.

 

8Vw4IUs.jpg?1

 

Effort 1 vs. effort 2:

 

Eghq8Od.jpg?1

 

And under a coat of Surfacer, compared to the original part:

 

0Q5ADuj.jpg?1

 

I have cleaned up the small blemishes and it's now in RLM 02, and I'm a happy camper. This was really, really fun to do!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...