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wpierson

Off topic - scale auto paint questions

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Hi All;

 

I normally build aircraft but got talked into building the AMT 55 Nomad in 1/16 scale. So I guess it's large scale auto! :)

Anyhoo, my daughter wanted a two tone green paint job. I found the paint from MCW it's supposed to be scale authentic colors for a 55. I got them in the mail and I got primer, two paints and a clear coat. THEY'RE ALL LACQUERS! I've never sprayed with lacquers before, so any help and hints about the whole thing would be greatly appreciated!

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Prep, prep, prep, and then prep! Ray is right lacquers spray really nicely (the best IMHO) but the offset for some are is the intense smell. 

Spend your time prepping the surface to be clean and debris free, and thin the lacquer down enough with the proper thinner so as to be thicker than water but not by much. A good spray test bed would be good, to see how the paint is flowing.

Also as Ray mentioned utilize a spray booth of you have one, or if no spray booth, get somewhere where there is plenty of ventalation. A charcoal filter mask is even better. Lacquer fumes are no joke, so definitely dont shoot them anywhere without sufficient ventalation.

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1 hour ago, LSP_Ray said:

Lacquers spray really well! As usual, all about the thinning. Keep a wet leading edge to keep a good smooth finish and reduce orange peel. Also, need good ventilation and probably a good mask with filter!

 

Also worth mentioning, is the fact that lacquers can easily be wet sanded and polished to a glass-like shine. This is a '68 Dodge Charger that I have underway.

 

FemRSk.jpg

 

 

 

 

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There is a possibility that you have painted with lacquer and didn't know it.  There are unfortunately several paints on the market that advertise as acrylic but have a cellulose/xylene/toluene/etc solvent which is what a modern lacquer is.  Regardless though, those solvents will dissolve a large magnitude of compounds which makes them great for paints but can also make them extremely harmful and toxic.  So definitely use a respirator and a booth. 

 

As far as prep, it is absolutely imperative to use that primer over every surface you intend to paint with thr lacquer as it will dissolve plastic.  Also if you do any sort of body prep even as simple as removing parting lines, if you don't use a primer you will get etching which is where the removed objects will dissolve a little bit compared to the surrounding area creating a ghost image.  Another concern is if you have colored plastic.  Any like yellow, red, orange, etc can actually leach out into the paint and change the overall color.  It's best to put a sealer between the primer and color coats if that is the case.  There are some good articles out there and even some with MCW paints.  Look for ones by Robert Downie in particular as he is one of the best.  Clay Kemp is another. 

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Thank you all for the advice! One thing I noticed is MCW states their lacquers do not need to be thinned. When I got the paints, they are at a milk like consistency, so I don't think I need worry about that. One article said that a pressure of about 20 psi is best for spraying with a medium tip to prevent the paints from drying before contact. Do you agree? Plus can anyone suggest a good respirator? I have a good booth but safety first!

 

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I’ve used MCW paint in the past, and it’s good stuff! No thinning is necessary, but as others have said, you have to apply it over a primer. I use Tamiya, gray or white, depending on what color I’ll be spraying. Some of these paints are a flat base coat and then you have to apply a clear gloss coat for the final shine. Not sure about the one you’re using, but don’t panic if it comes out flat. I’ve found that 20 psi works well with this kind of paint. 

 

Other similar auto paints I’ve used with good results: Splash Paints, Zero Paint, and Gravity Colors from Spain (NOT Gravity USA!!).

 

Here is a good tutorial for painting a car body that I’ve found helpful: LINK  His other tutorials are very good, too.

 

Here’s another good one from Zero Paint: Link to pdf

 

Ben

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A good spray booth can go a long way to dispersing the particulate, and removing a large % of the smell.

Lots of guys DIY spray boxes. I personally went with an Artograph 1530, as it had enough size to do a majority of LSPs, has a 3 stage charcoal filtering system, and nearly 400 CFM with a removable top to do really big LSPs.

 

 

31TAQqHpscL._AC_SX425_.jpg

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2 hours ago, Out2gtcha said:

A good spray booth can go a long way to dispersing the particulate, and removing a large % of the smell.

Lots of guys DIY spray boxes. I personally went with an Artograph 1530, as it had enough size to do a majority of LSPs, has a 3 stage charcoal filtering system, and nearly 400 CFM with a removable top to do really big LSPs.

 

I'll be building my own (more or less like my old one), sometime this summer, or at least that's the plan. 3'x3'x2' with two squirrel cage blowers, 530 CFM total (ideal), a built-in plenum area, and using a standard 1x16x20 HEPA furnace filter.

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