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Jennings Heilig

Cancer, you suck!!!!

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My best friend's younger brother (who is my age) was transferred to a hospice house yesterday, riddled with untreatable, inoperable mets from the prostate cancer he's been battling for about 4 years.  It's probably a matter of days for him.  He just married a little over a year ago (for the first time for both of them).

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Yep, that sucks, for sure, Jennings. Things like this make me feel so utterly helpless. An acquaintance of mine works in cancer research, aiming to specifically target and treat specific areas of cancer, while simultaneously doing extensive research to assure that the treatment(s) themselves don't adversely affect other adjacent areas, and it seems to be a rather painstaking and time consuming process, but progress is being made all the time, regardless of how slowly.

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I’m very sorry about your friends brother Jennings, sounds like he’s in the right place now. My thoughts are with you and your friends.

 

At the risk of sounding insensitive however may I take the opportunity to urge all to have their prostate examined please... Step up and just do it. I suffer from BPH, but it pales in comparison to what he and his family are going through to be sure.
 

With only my kindest thoughts and regards;

 

jimbo

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Condolences Jennings...

 

With regard to prostate exams, I am coming due for my first.   I have to admit I'm a bit confused by all I read out there.   First a colonoscopy is critical, then I read that it really isn't, there are other, less invasive tests.    I need to get with my physician and discuss but if there are options to that procedure, I'd love to hear about them (BTW, no history of prostate issues in my family). 

 

 

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Colonoscopies - get one at age 50 unless you have a family history, then get one at 45.  Every 10 years unless they find something suspicious.  If you have no family history, then the Cologuard test is okay, but it’s not a substitute for somebody putting eyeballs on your innards.  And not all eyeballs are created equal when it comes to colonoscopies.  I do anesthesia for them about ten days a month, and there are some GI docs I’d trust and a whole lot I wouldn’t.  

 

And don’t believe the hokum that nobody needs a colonoscopy after age 70 or 75.  My mom was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer at age 83, and ultimately died from complications related to it.  If she’d had a scope five years sooner, she might well still be with us.

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Man so sorry to hear this - sucks big time.

 

Regarding tests - yeah get those scopes done early especially if there is ANY family history - I was due to get my first at 50 but should had them at 45 (at 49 got sick and sure enough was all cancer'ed up down there....)

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Sorry to hear that Jennings, and all of you. We are just starting the testing procedure for a lump in my father in laws arm. Pete in RI. I also lost my step farther to colon cancer. 

Edited by europapete
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Sorry to hear about your friend Jennings.

 

I lost a cousin a few weeks back to Stage 4 cancer.   She had originally gone in for shortness of breath and they found out she had cancer everywhere.   The Dr’s told her to go home and get her things in order.   Two months later she left us.   She just retired early last year at 62.   What a wicked disease.  .     

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Very sorry to hear about this.  My younger brother passed less than a year ago from cancer too.  I'm very grateful for the care he received in hospice, and the wonderful staff too.  I hope your friend's brother also receives the same sort of care.  Cancer is indeed a wicked disease.

 

 

Condolences,

Michael

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6 hours ago, Troy Molitor said:

She just retired early last year at 62.

 

Which really makes me want to cash in my retirement account and spend every last f**king dime of it on good food, travel, and fun.  Then just go out on my own terms and in my own time.  I won't leave any heirs, so I plan on maxing out all of my credit cards before I go.

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7 hours ago, Jennings Heilig said:

 

Which really makes me want to cash in my retirement account and spend every last f**king dime of it on good food, travel, and fun.  Then just go out on my own terms and in my own time.  I won't leave any heirs, so I plan on maxing out all of my credit cards before I go.

 

Sounds like a plan!!  :thumbsup:  Life is for living.  My father died at 58, (heart attack), his sister at about the same age (MND), his father at 63 and his mother even younger (both heart attacks), my mother at 67 and younger brother at 57 (both cancer).  You never know when your number is up.  So when I had a health scare at 56 (liver and renal failure, cause still unknown), I remember lying in my hospital bed thinking about my life and I decided that the next time my boss messed me about (he liked power games), I would tell him to go and have sex with himself.  I'm still a bit surprised it took him two months to do this, and and he did it big time.  That's when I retired.  And told him in no uncertain terms where to go.

 

I hope to turn 65 in March.  I don't have a big nest egg, but I get enough from it that I can live well enough, and I have no debts.  Life without work stress helps you live a healthier life, and I think birthdays are a good thing.  I hope to have some more. 

 

It all depends on how happy you are in life now, and whether you enjoy your work.  I was successful at my job, and have the external bench marking exercise to prove it.  But my boss was an idiot, clever in his own way, but insecure and given to power games as I've mentioned.  And I'd worked at two other companies in recent years with equal success but too many idiots above trying to justify their existence, which seems to be modern management practice.  I don't need that.

 

So i would always encourage anyone approaching retirement age to think carefully about their life, and act selfishly and look after yourself, whatever they decide. 

 

 

Cheers,

Michael

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With regard to living life before you check out, I can only add that back when I was in my 20's, I was nearly killed in a car accident.   Only by a freak of luck did I not get crushed to death.   There is something very intense at the moment when you are sure you are seconds away from dying.  In my case, it was massive, overwhelming regret that I was about to die and there was so much in life I hadn't done yet (that and disappointment that I wouldn't be home for dinner and my wife had made my favorite meal).   This experience re-calibrated my outlook on life. 

 

The moral to my story is that don't just assume you will be around later in life and hold off on doing all the fun things you want to do until "tomorrow".   Life is funny, for some folks, they will never get a "tomorrow".   Live life to the fullest extent possible.   Not saying quit your jobs and empty your savings accounts but just try to add some fun experiences now, not just wait for "tomorrow".

 

Carpe Diem Baby!

 

 

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I suppose one should strike some sort of balance between living for the here and now as well as planning for the future. Like a famous baseball player, I always had it in my head, starting in my mid-teens, that I was never going to live to see the next decade anyway, so lived exclusively for the moment, assuming that I had no future. I'm paying the price for that now though, 66 and living on a not too substantial social security pension (thank god for FDR), so in my case, living solely for the present was not really a wise choice at all.

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