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Thunnus

1/32 Zoukei-Mura Ta152H-1 White 7

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On 1/13/2020 at 1:59 AM, Antonio Argudo said:

wow, great cockpit John, really stands out!!!  

one small detail of the control column caught my eye, the central portion was also black not grey, some ref here, keep that beast forward mate, cheers

68515858-10217547665834862-4404435451050

ww2-german-luftwaffe-kg12-control-1-28ab

 

There was more than 1 color. Some were painted, some were anodized, some were even plum color...

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"The fuselage assembly went together fairly well, requiring a small amount of filler on the fuselage spine.  What are the odds that the Revi 16 gun sight gets knocked off before I can attach the windshield?"

 

about 70 - 30 I reckon :lol:

 

Superb work joking aside.

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Hi Thunnus,  I'm really enjoying your work so far. I'm also  building White 7 from this kit, but I've put it aside for the time being. I love the Claes Sundin art profile for this A/C that you've posted on page 1, it's so artistically inspiring.

 

If I'm not mistaken,  the H-0 version had a wooden tail so don't make the mistake I did, there shouldn't be rivets on the tail fin.

All the best,

Cheers, 

Pete

Edited by PeterOlsen

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Here is an update covering some of the work that I've been doing on the Ta152 over the past few days.

A view of the cockpit encased within the fuselage.  This was before I realized that the instrument panel hood would place the IP too far back.  So I've popped off the IP and will be adding an additional spacer to push it out closer to the pilot.
IMG-6705.jpg

 

A preliminary view of the engine parts.  As usual, I don't think I will be leaving any fuselage hatches/covers in an open position so engine will most likely be hidden from view.  So I've decided to paint the kit parts but not add anything extra.
IMG-6708.jpg
IMG-6707.jpg

 

The panels on the wing bottom need to be changed so the first step is to fill in the conflicting panel lines.  I'm going to use my newly concocted batch of sprue goo for the fill operation.  Hopefully, this plastic material will provide a uniform base for the scribing of new panel lines.
IMG-6709.jpg

 

The goo is given ample time (24 hours) to cure before sanding.  The engine cowling, previously filled with Mr Surfacer, is also smoothed out at this stage.
IMG-6711.jpg
IMG-6710.jpg

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A light coat of grey to check the filled panel lines.  So far so good.
IMG-6712.jpg

 

Using masks cut with a Silhouette Portrait cutter, I can mark the locations of the new hatches and ports.  The brass template for the large 4-sided access panel are temporarily glued into place with CA glue.  Black paint is used to mark the locations for the smaller ports upon which I can use a standard scribing template.
IMG-6713.jpg
IMG-6714.jpg

 

This is where I started running into trouble.  I had hoped that the panel lines that I had filled with sprue goo would give me a consistent material over which I could run a scriber but this was not the case.  The filled areas were much softer than the plastic and it was difficult to track a consistently straight light through any area that had been filled.  The filled areas, being softer, clung to any excess pushed up by the scriber, making it more difficult to clean up the lines that had been scribed.  And white putty on black putty is not the easiest color combination to worth with since it is hard to distinguish between the putty and sanding dust.
IMG-6717.jpg

 

Another shot of grey paint removes the visual clutter of the filled lines.  But it also reveals the imperfections from the scriber getting bogged down by the softer sprue goo.  So frustrating... I was really disappointed at this stage and was compelled to put down my work and go do something else.
IMG-6718.jpg
IMG-6720.jpg

 

When I came back, I didn't think the results were THAT bad.  Most of the shapes seemed workable.  Re-tracing the shapes using the templates cleaned up some of the slop.  The worst spots were filled with Black CA and re-scribed.  So now I am in micro-cleanup mode, using dabs of Mr Surfacer to repair scratches and make the lines more uniform.  Getting there...
IMG-6721.jpg

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I think the main issue you had with the panel lines is not leaving the sprue goo to cure for long enough. There's an old thread in the techniques forum where a member outlines his experiments with various melted sprue filler concoctions, and the general consensus was it had to be left alone for extraordinary lengths of time - weeks, sometimes! I'd have given yours a few days at least before attempting to scribe through it, John.

 

Still, it's all looking pretty good!

 

Kev

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John,

 

Way to persevere! So often I’ve walked away, thinking my results were irretrievable, only to come back with a fresh perspective. I was going to suggest sanding away ALL of the engraved detail and adding what you want to a clean slate, but you seem to have powered through!

 

Cheers,  Tom

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3 hours ago, LSP_Kevin said:

I think the main issue you had with the panel lines is not leaving the sprue goo to cure for long enough. There's an old thread in the techniques forum where a member outlines his experiments with various melted sprue filler concoctions, and the general consensus was it had to be left alone for extraordinary lengths of time - weeks, sometimes! I'd have given yours a few days at least before attempting to scribe through it, John.

 

Still, it's all looking pretty good!

 

Kev

 

Thanks Kevin!  Weeks???  I thought 24 hours was a good amount of dry time but it was obviously inadequate.  I don't know if I have the patience to use sprue goo on a regular basis but if I do use it, I'll give it more time to harden.

 

 

1 hour ago, chrish said:

Agree with Kev.

all that work is showing progress though

 

Yes, it's slow work right now but things are moving forward!

 

 

14 minutes ago, Uncarina said:

John,

 

Way to persevere! So often I’ve walked away, thinking my results were irretrievable, only to come back with a fresh perspective. I was going to suggest sanding away ALL of the engraved detail and adding what you want to a clean slate, but you seem to have powered through!

 

Cheers,  Tom

 

Thanks Tom!  I get really discouraged when things take an ugly turn.  I don't want that negativity make a small mistake even bigger so sometimes I force myself to put it down, walk away and spend some time with the family or watch TV or go fishing.  Anything to get my mind off the build and allow my mind to reset.  It really does help.

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18 hours ago, PeterOlsen said:

Hi Thunnus,  I'm really enjoying your work so far. I'm also  building White 7 from this kit, but I've put it aside for the time being. I love the Claes Sundin art profile for this A/C that you've posted on page 1, it's so artistically inspiring.

 

If I'm not mistaken,  the H-0 version had a wooden tail so don't make the mistake I did, there shouldn't be rivets on the tail fin.

All the best,

Cheers, 

Pete

Thanks Pete! Interesting point! How certain are we that all H-0s had wooden tails? I know that the NASM H-0 has a wooden tail but I wasn’t assuming that necessarily applied to White 7.

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4 minutes ago, Thunnus said:

How certain are we that all H-0s had wooden tails?

The H-0, being pre-production, only occasionally had wooden tails. The wooden tail became standard on the H-1, but there were still metal tails on some of those, too. 

 

HTH,

D

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