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Jennings Heilig

Interesting 3D printer

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What’s interesting enough to bring this up as it’s own topic? Neither is a new product, but both are superb for the money.  I have a photon, friend of mine has the Mars. Both are great options especially once you add a double rail to help stabilize the vertical axis :)

 

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28 minutes ago, seiran01 said:

What’s interesting enough to bring this up as it’s own topic?

 

For those of us that were unaware of these (like myself), it's very interesting,... and appreciated.

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Fair enough, didn’t mean anything negative if it sounded that way!  I’ve been so heavily focused on cad design and printing this year that my default train of thought didnt immediately consider that most LSP members probably know little of anything about resin printing.

Jennings, thanks for posting this 
 

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The Elegoo Mars is the very 3D printer I own.  It's really nice.  You'll never print an average size 1/32 scale fuselage with it (the print area isn't large enough) but it does a fantastic job with small to medium sized prints.  Of course there is a learning curve with this type of printer and I learned fairly quickly that you need to have your Z axis lubed really well or you'll get a "layered" print...  the slicing software that comes with the printer is nice.  You'll want to use the Elegoo printer resins with this guy as it gets rave reviews because of it's viscosity (it's thinner than other 3D printing resins).  

 

A few downsides of this type of resin printing:  It takes UV light to cure.  That means building/buying a UV curing chamber (I saw one built for around $30 at Formlabs) or leaving it in the sun to cure for a while (the longer the better).  Other downside is that if you don't print something completely solid (and you shouldn't if at all possible, on larger, thicker prints), you need to leave a couple of little holes for the liquid resin inside the print, to leak out.  If you don't, it will find a  way (usually through an error in the print that results in a small hole) a way out and ruin the printed surface.  I've experienced that one first hand too.  As modelers, it's really easy to plug the holes afterward with some stretched styrene and superglue.  Or, you can avail yourself of the 3D printers software and leave the "holes" that were removed from the print on the build plate.  I usually just delete them and fill the holes with a tapered stretched sprue plug and superglue.  Lastly, the liquid resin is VERY sneaky and if you're not careful, it can get all over the place.  You'll also need to clean your prints after they come out of the bath with at least 91% isopropyl or simple green or equivalent before subjecting them to the UV curing process.  If you don't, you'll get blobs of solidified runs on your print that are impossible to remove (they look like paint runs only thicker).

 

For me, the toughest part of this entire resin 3D printing thing is the 3D design software.  I have a "hobby" (i.e., free to use for a limited time) copy of Fusion360 and it's a bear to get into.   Even tinkercad (a free online 3D deisgn tool) has a learning curve with it.  The good thing is that you can design something in tinkercad, save it and then import it into Fusion360 and work it more.  Both software programs are from Autodesk so they're compatible.

 

As for other 3D design software programs, I'll let others comment.  I have no experience with them.  I have a simple motto with reputable software like this... "If it's free, it's for me!"

Edited by Juggernut
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I use the Elegoo Mars.  I've been very happy with it so far.  I've tried a few different resins, but I've had the most success with Elegoo's standard grey resin.

 

 

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Thanks for putting up here and it is interesting, well to me anyway. The only reason I would be cautious about this stuff is that the resin bits warp over time, I've got quite a few parts left over from a film I worked on and if I look at the parts all the thinner parts have warped, We found the resin quite expensive overall and also it does not like flat surfaces, sometimes you can't always tilt the object to avoid this and it ends up looking like a quilted mattress. 

Graham 

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Interesting to see that my post on Hyperscale found some resonance here as well. I didn't post here as modellers already make use of this kind of printers on Large Scale Planes and there is an interesting post covering it.

 

https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/70571-3d-printing/

 

It works well and I am mighty impressed with the result.

 

3 hours ago, GrahamF said:

Thanks for putting up here and it is interesting, well to me anyway. The only reason I would be cautious about this stuff is that the resin bits warp over time, I've got quite a few parts left over from a film I worked on and if I look at the parts all the thinner parts have warped, We found the resin quite expensive overall and also it does not like flat surfaces, sometimes you can't always tilt the object to avoid this and it ends up looking like a quilted mattress. 

Graham 

 

I think warping depends on the resin used, and there is a lot to choose from. Obviously I can't comment on it as my prints are less than a week old. The cost of resin came down a lot and the Elegoo stuff is now less than US$40 a liter which will last you a long time.

 

There is the belief that you can't print flat on the print plate due to suction forces of the newly UV exposed resin on the FEP film, making it to come loose from the print plate, resulting in a failed print and the way to eliminate this is to print the parts at an angle.

 

Most of my prints had been printed straight on the print plate and nothing came loose as long as you expose the first 6 to 8 layers long enough.

Resin-02.jpg

 

Saying that, there is an issue with the Elegoo Mars as the first mm or so get squashed together resulting that a 2.5mm thick item will end up only 1mm thick.

Resin-Sample.jpg

Of the above Su-7 IP in 1/48 scale, left is printed flat on the print plate and right horizontal on supports. The above mentioned issue resulted in the left sample to be way to thin and compressed and the right sample to be too short. But the first sample, even so rather thin came off the print plate without any issues and is totally flat.

 

Now this is a serious issue for printing scale model parts, but fortunately there are several fixes for this.

https://www.alexwhittemore.com/troubleshooting-the-elegoo-mars-z-accuracy-squished-first-layers/

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3918220

 

Yes a bit disappointing, but please keep in mind that we talk about a US$ 280 printer. Elegoo is also releasing a Pro model soon which will have some of the shortcomings corrected.

Cheers, Peter

 

 

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