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Fred Jack

Fokker F1 and DR1

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Posted (edited)

Since Fokker had the fabric nailed on instead of stitched, does anyone know if the striping bled through to the inside of the fuselage? I guess this applies to the early DVll as well.

Edited by Fred Jack

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Not sure what nailing/stitching has to do with bleed-thru, but no, I don’t believe the streaking bled through to the cockpit interior.  Others may know more.  I’m miles away from my references.

 

 

Tony

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19 minutes ago, Snowbird3a said:

Not sure what nailing/stitching has to do with bleed-thru, but no, I don’t believe the streaking bled through to the cockpit interior.  Others may know more.  I’m miles away from my references.

 

Tony

 

Agreed. The streaking would probably allow varying amounts of light to be transmitted through to the interior though, which could be simulated using some creative painting of the inner fabric surfaces, if one chose to take that path.

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40 minutes ago, D Bellis said:

Just curious: How would one "nail" fabric covering to a steel-tube fuselage structure?  

 

D

 

 

And yes, I know what you mean

 

For that matter, was it even nailed to the wooden bits?:

 

http://www.primrose-engineering.co.uk/wp-content/gallery/aeroplane-methods/Taping1.jpeg

 

Richard

 

 

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Good points. From what I recall, the fuselage tubing of the D.VII & Dr.I  had fabric strips wrapped around the tubing portions, then the outer fabric was stitched to that. Wing structures (non-tubing areas) had fabric strips doped to them, with outer fabric being in turn stitched to those. I also seem to recall that the really early Fokkers (such as the E.III) may have used nails to attach the initial tapes that the outer fabric was attached to, but I'm not 100% sure about that.

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In the Paul Leaman book on the triplane there is a photo of 144/17 with half of the fuselage stripped of its fabric.   No bleed through is shown.

 

Tony

 

PS,  the fabric was not nailed to the wing ribs, it was bound by cord

 

Edited by Snowbird3a

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1 hour ago, Snowbird3a said:

In the Paul Leaman book on the triplane there is a photo of 144/17 with half of the fuselage stripped of its fabric.   No bleed through is shown.

 

Hurrah - a proper answer!

 

Richard

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Fokker ordered the fabric to be nailed on to cut production costs. Maybe this is why Aces, like Udet, who received Fokker built D-Vlls had their wings replaced with Albatros built wings.

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6 hours ago, Fred Jack said:

Fokker ordered the fabric to be nailed on to cut production costs. Maybe this is why Aces, like Udet, who received Fokker built D-Vlls had their wings replaced with Albatros built wings.

can you give us a reference for this ???

 

Tony

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I think the printed fabric definately, and the streaked most probably is some what see translucent.
There is an incredibly talented Saxon craftman build E1s, Dr1s and Fok DVIIs &VIIIs to original specs.
I personally regard his work as the ultimate guide for modelling these types.
Join his page to follow.
I hope he won't mind me sharing the Fokker love.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/2145618568814194/photos/"
46262368_2573783302646874_58822611684913

Edited by Kais
Corrections

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Photos of Gonterman’s 115/17 crash show the inside cockpit fabric— no streaking bleed through.  Photos of Pastor’s 121/17 crash show lots of ripped fabric with not an ounce of bleed through.

 

Also, the photo of Voss in the triplane with a headrest, shows some cockpit fabric interior and no bleed through is evident

 

Tony

Edited by Snowbird3a

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21 hours ago, Snowbird3a said:

can you give us a reference for this ???

 

Tony

I found a reference for nailing the wing fabric, it is page 149 of the Leaman book.  I stand corrected.

 

Tony

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7 hours ago, Snowbird3a said:

I found a reference for nailing the wing fabric, it is page 149 of the Leaman book.  I stand corrected.

 

Tony

 

It still begs the question about streaky fabric. The fabric could only have been nailed to the wings, the rest of the 'plane had a steel structure. So there isn't anywhere that the nails could make a difference to something you can see on a model. The sides of the cockpit (and insides of the tail skid aperture) are in the steel structure - no nails

 

That part of the fuselage had a sewn cover fitted over the structure and laced together underneath. 

 

Richard

Edited by RLWP

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