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Can anyone tell me which thinner to use with the Tamiya spray cans please?

 

i have read of modellers decanting it into a container, then leaving it to degas for an hour before attempting to spray from an airbrush.

 

There must be some risk of the paint drying out if thinner is not added in time.

 

Can MrLevellingthinner 400 be used or is it better to use the Tamiya own brand , yellow, white, or blue top?

 

Thanks for any advice as this is the first time I have attempted this.

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Mr. Color Thinner (Levelling or not) is what I use. The Tamiya brand lacquer thinner will work too, obviously (I don't use it myself, so I don't know what colour the top is). I usually find I have to leave the decanted paint for much more than an hour, as it remains volatile for quite some time. Keep a toothpick or cocktail stick in the jar and stir it (gently!) occasionally, and you'll see what I mean. Trying to airbrush with it before it's ready would literally be an explosive experience! Adding thinner to the decanted paint when it's ready is pretty much a must, as even fresh out of the spray can, it's still heavier than a normal airbrush-ready mixture would be.

 

Kev

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Thanks for your advice Kev and Bevan.

 

I decanted the spray into a clean empty Tamiya jar and added about 15% Mr.Color Leveling Thinner 400.

 

Left it alone for about 40 mins and watched the bubbles fizz as the gas vented off.

 

Sprayed it through the airbrush a short while later and it worked a treat.

 

The paints are great, quick drying but sometimes you just want the precise control of the airbrush instead of the broad brush effect of the spray can.

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Interesting! I've never gotten away with leaving it for such a short time. I've also never tried adding the thinner immediately after decanting; I always wait until it's ready to use, and thin it appropriately then. Glad it worked out for you!

 

Kev

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That is interesting! I have never been able to shoot decanted paint in less than a couple hours.

I'll have to experiment with adding thinner first, then see how long it takes to degas. 

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Posted (edited)

I decant and shoot Tamiya lacquer spray bombs all the time. You typically need to add some thinner and I use both Tamiya Lacquer Thinner and Mr Color Levelling Thinner (both work great)(I thin just prior to airbrushing). I typically wait about 30-60 minutes for the decanted paint to outgas in an open jar, and I have no problems airbrushing them. 

Edited by modelingbob

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I decant Tamiya silver spray directly into the airbrush paint cup, wait 5 minutes for the bubbles to disappear and add about 20 percent cellulosic thinner stirring with a cotton bud.

It works everytime.

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I suspect the reason my decanted paint remains volatile for so much longer than you guys are reporting, is that I decant into an old Tamiya or Gunze paint jar, and basically fill it up. So the volume of paint (and therefore volatile gasses) is probably greater than what others are dealing with. That's the only explanation I can think of!

 

Kev

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Never fill up your bottle with decanted spray bomb paint! I always fill about 1/4 of the way, maximum. If you fill to the top, you may witness an explosion with paint bubbling out all over the place. Do not ask how I know this! Placing a cocktail stick into the paint helps outgassing, and by gently, and I mean gently, stirring it will help accelerate the outgassing process. 

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47 minutes ago, modelingbob said:

Never fill up your bottle with decanted spray bomb paint! I always fill about 1/4 of the way, maximum. If you fill to the top, you may witness an explosion with paint bubbling out all over the place. Do not ask how I know this! Placing a cocktail stick into the paint helps outgassing, and by gently, and I mean gently, stirring it will help accelerate the outgassing process. 

Thar's remembering me what happened when a steel ball contained in the spray bomb , (after opening by cutting the bomb to get the maximum of paint), that ball felt down into the jar with the NOT degassing paint...

The paint not degassing is rather "ticklish". 

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