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8 hours ago, vince14 said:

Yes. That's the nature of resin kits. All the parts will need some degree of attention because they're, y'know, cast from resin rather than created from liquid plastic in an injection moulding machine.

 

There's a reason why resin kits are labelled as not for beginners. You need to understand how resin works, what types of cement you can use, even know that you'll need to clean the parts thoroughly before you begin and that you'll need to use primer on every single part before you start 'proper' painting. And, yes, you need to understand that you'll have to adhere to the 'measure twice, cut once' rule and for some parts you might spend a lot of time sanding to get it to fit. You need to understand that you must wear at least a dust mask (a respirator is better) when sanding those parts, because you really don't want to be inhaling resin dust.

 

But building resin kits really helps you improve as a modeller. I used to be a 'I don't want to do more than shake the box' type, but having spent a number of years now building resin and multi-media kits it's actually improved my plastic builds too.

 

 

and yet Graham at Iconicair says exactly the opposite ie it doesn't necessarily *have* to be like this with resin kits....

 

I have read enough on here to know that irrespective of the subject, I would never touch a HPH resin kit;

I'm not that good a modeller, and my life is too short and I have too many kits that I really want to build.

 

I am open minded about HPH's foray into the injection moulded world, but am hoping for something better than Fly's Hurricane for instance (again, life too short etc etc).

 

 

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, vince14 said:

Maybe you all got unlucky, then, but I found building the HPH Hornet no more difficult than any other resin or multi-media kit ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

 I remember a build thread a while back for their La-7. It definitely wasn't a Tamiya "shake the box" project, but it didn't seem any more arduous than the average resin kit. 

 

 

Edited by coogrfan

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My issue really isnt with the resin parts, and/or having to sand them down, that comes with the territory on all resin kits. Its the build  methodology and the horrible, horrible mistakes that should have been taken care of at the factory, of the two (so far) HpH kits Ive built. That and the resin pool method that is unlike any other resin kit I've built. 

 

I'm not sure how many if any other HpH kits have similar issues, but if you have ever attempted the HpH Tiger cat at the very least it has big problems. And they aren't the type of problems that should come with any kit, resin or otherwise.  Just plain stupid mistakes made in tooling and molding that should never have been there in the first place. Just take a gander through my F7F build thread, and you will see the many issues encountered, and anyone who has built resin kits in the past will know those are NOT the kind of things one finds in the average (or any) resin kit I know of. 

I can only hope their Me-410, La-7 dont have the same issues, but from what I have seen here, it appears the Tigercat may be the only one to have the major issues I speak of.    I have the La-7 too, and will be building it.  

 

I would most certainly give any HpH IM kit a chance. It makes way, way more sense of financially workable for the company, and the likelihood of having to remove parts from a resin pool goes down substantially I would think with an IM kit (if resin parts are in fact included)

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All this angst. I'm glad my only forays into resin have been in 1/32 modern aerospace ground equipment (there's some lovely stuff out there) and add-on detail bits and bobs.

 

Anyone got an update on the Fly Tunnan? 

 

Tony 

 

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20 hours ago, vince14 said:

Yes. That's the nature of resin kits. All the parts will need some degree of attention because they're, y'know, cast from resin rather than created from liquid plastic in an injection moulding machine.

 

There's a reason why resin kits are labelled as not for beginners. You need to understand how resin works, what types of cement you can use, even know that you'll need to clean the parts thoroughly before you begin and that you'll need to use primer on every single part before you start 'proper' painting. And, yes, you need to understand that you'll have to adhere to the 'measure twice, cut once' rule and for some parts you might spend a lot of time sanding to get it to fit. You need to understand that you must wear at least a dust mask (a respirator is better) when sanding those parts, because you really don't want to be inhaling resin dust.

 

But building resin kits really helps you improve as a modeller. I used to be a 'I don't want to do more than shake the box' type, but having spent a number of years now building resin and multi-media kits it's actually improved my plastic builds too.

 

With the greatest of respect, I've build many resin kits, like Silver Wings & Planet Models. I've also dealt with tons of resin AM, like Eduard. 

 

I actually enjoy resin builds. Silver Wings kits are an absolute joy to build. I consider myself an experienced resin builder, and I normally never avoid a kit because it's resin, as many builders do.

 

Silver Wings resin kits just don't come attached to acres of resin. Eduard parts have simple resin spouts to remove, if any. Then, the parts fit, with minor - if any - adjustments needed.

 

HpH, by comparison, comes with miles of resin attached. With the pools of resin, it's unclear how much of the resin needs to be removed, and the only way to remove it is to sand it. it can't be cut, because of the area. So you sand, only to find you've taken too much off, or too little, or done it perfectly and it still won't fit.

 

To be clear, this is not a case of "new to resin", or preferring IP kits. There's a reason so many HpH kits get to the shelf of doom, a reason why you see so many kits started on WIP's and suddenly stop, a reason you that HpH completed builds are like rocking horse pooh. If a builder as skilled as Brian also finds then irksome, that's also pretty damning evidence in my book.

 

Those who have successfully built HpH kits have my greatest respect. They have more skill & patience than I possess! I'm not saying the kits are unbuildable, more that - to me - they are not enjoyable to build and, that negates the whole point of the hobby.

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10 hours ago, vince14 said:

Maybe you all got unlucky, then, but I found building the HPH Hornet no more difficult than any other resin or multi-media kit ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

That's interesting. 

 

Perhaps HpH upped their game? The problem is that I've been so badly burned I'm not willing to find out.

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Agreed, having seen the one and ONLY finished HpH Tigercat I have ever seen I have the utmost respect for Mark (and everyone!) who finishes an HpH resin kit.  I will likely continue to buy any HpH kits that I am passionate about, hoping they wont have the F7F issues.

 

Having built FM&P and Silverwings kits, I 100% concur they build up like a dream. Especially Pauls kits. 

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Could well be a better way of a return on their initial investment. 

 

Might do for them in sales of their other kits as folk might think to hold back buying in the hope of a cheaper, not to mention easier to build, IM kit release in the future. 

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