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JerseyChris

The 4/5 build conundrum

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Hey chaps, as I type this I’m looking at a tamiya 1/32 f4e that’s four fifths finished and I just can’t get over the finishing line. It’s literally gathering dust and in the meantime I’ve just built (and about to finish) a little 1/72 vintage air fix Blenheim. I believe the shelf of doom is calling the phantom, tbh I think part of the problem was that it wasn’t the most pleasurable build  and because of that my enthusiasm was sucked out of me!

 

Am I the only one who has this problem?

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Not at all!

theres another thread running here somewhere about shelf of doom subjects...I’d suggest looking at that but, I haven’t got the ambition too...hahaha

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Nope, very common infliction. I have several including a Tamiya Mossie.  I think there are several Tamiya Mossie's in that state. It's such an involved built that you burn out.  I think Wolf is in the same boat with his Mossie build.  I also have a Tamiya Spit that is in paint for the last two years. Several car models and three or for tanks. 

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I have an Italeri Opel Blitz that sat on the shelf so long that the rubber wheels ate through the cargo bed where I had lain them when I stuck it back on the shelf. It's still sitting up there; wonder if the tires have burned through to the shelf itself yet?

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Usually I encounter all my "stalling points" (any point in the build that would either prevent me from finishing it because of some issue, or it got so tedious I put it on the SOD) during the build, deep in, but normally not close to the finish line.    Normally if im 4/5ths done, I usually finish up as I enjoy those points in a build (paint and weathering).

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, Out2gtcha said:

Usually I encounter all my "stalling points" (any point in the build that would either prevent me from finishing it because of some issue, or it got so tedious I put it on the SOD) during the build, deep in, but normally not close to the finish line.    Normally if im 4/5ths done, I usually finish up as I enjoy those points in a build (paint and weathering).

 

It's just my own experience but I'm finding the opposite, that it's the finishing that makes me hesitate. I love building and adding in details, even scratch building parts, but the final finishing and painting makes me anxious. I don't seem to be able to achieve the paint finish and weathering I have pictured in my mind, and that disappoints me. I know the solution to that is just practice, and finishing more models...kind of a Catch-22. Just a skill I have to learn and improve, and then it won't be so much of a problem.

 

So yes, 4/5 build syndrome fits well.

 

Richard

Edited by R Palimaka

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22 minutes ago, R Palimaka said:

 

It's just my own experience but I'm finding the opposite, that it's the finishing that makes me hesitate. I love building and adding in details, even scratch building parts, but the final finishing and painting makes me anxious. I don't seem to be able to achieve the paint finish and weathering I have pictured in my mind, and that disappoints me. I know the solution to that is just practice, and finishing more models...kind of a Catch-22. Just a skill I have to learn and improve, and then it won't be so much of a problem.

 

So yes, 4/5 build syndrome fits well.

 

Richard

 

 

Ouch!  It would be disappointing in that respect, but I guess I've hit so many trials and errors that I'm generally happy with outcomes save a few. I think you are right, practice makes perfect, but getting there is the hard part.

For me its more the tediousness that comes along with some builds that really sap my modeling will. once I know I'm close enough for paint/decals/weathering I usually get more excited, even though they don't always turn out exactly like I envision. 

 

I know what helped me with painting and finishes is a good paint mule, and time with the airbrush. Bad paint did not help with getting to the paint phase, but good paint really made that phase a lot more welcome (switching to MRP did the trick!)

 

Using the paint mule to nail down your  technique for paint finishing and spraying may go a long way to easing anxiety about that stage of the build.  Hell I actually built a model specifically to be a paint mule too.    Its really helped with any trepidation about finishes and weathering. 

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25 minutes ago, Out2gtcha said:

 

 

Ouch!  It would be disappointing in that respect, but I guess I've hit so many trials and errors that I'm generally happy with outcomes save a few. I think you are right, practice makes perfect, but getting there is the hard part.

For me its more the tediousness that comes along with some builds that really sap my modeling will. once I know I'm close enough for paint/decals/weathering I usually get more excited, even though they don't always turn out exactly like I envision. 

 

I know what helped me with painting and finishes is a good paint mule, and time with the airbrush. Bad paint did not help with getting to the paint phase, but good paint really made that phase a lot more welcome (switching to MRP did the trick!)

 

Using the paint mule to nail down your  technique for paint finishing and spraying may go a long way to easing anxiety about that stage of the build.  Hell I actually built a model specifically to be a paint mule too.    Its really helped with any trepidation about finishes and weathering. 

 

Thank you Brian, that's exactly the right answer.

 

I don't have a lot of experience with an airbrush yet, and I can't expect to get good results by just moving ahead on a model I've invested a lot of time on. Practicing on a mule or two first would give me the confidence I need to get over the anxiety. Right now I just worry that all that work will be a bit spoiled by paintwork that I'm not completely happy with. Doesn't help that my favourite aircraft are in natural metal finish lol. Have to say the decaling part does make me happy, that's when the model starts to come to life.

 

As for MRP paint, that paint line gets mentioned here often so will have to check them out.

 

Thanks again Brain...and see JerseyChris, you have company.

 

Richard 

 

 

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1. Switch to MRP paint - it really is a game changer.

 

2. get yourself a *quality* airbrush, something with a superfine needle.

I have a Harder and Steenbeck With 0.18mm and when combined with MRP it’s quite literally revolutionised my airbrushing.

 

yes plenty of modellers get great results with old school acrylic and mediocre airbrushes but this is about you ‘making that jump’, not looking at guys who do nothing but make models all day long

 

just my 2c

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It's not the kit what it is is you've sucked out the mystery of it, I would leave it for now and then later on get a book and re read about the prototype and you'll find you will have the enthusiasm to finish it off.

 I have a similar theory about kit reviews, I've noticed that I've never sold more than the one kit I've given away for a review, I think the potential buyer knows so much about the kit from the review apart from maybe what it smells like, that there's no need to buy it and slide into the attic!

So when you can clearly see what your model is going to like 4/5 finished it's boring. 

Graham

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