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LSP_Kevin

Attitude Aviation Buchon Conversion

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I got a bit carried away with this build when I should have been working on other things, and found myself all but finishing up the cockpit! Before that, though, I decided that I wasn't happy with the see-through look presented by the photo-etched radiator grille, so I fashioned a blanking plate out of styrene sheet:

 

41DXqd.jpg

 

BUl6aX.jpg

 

I then painted the entire area with Tamiya's Rubber Black (XF-85):

 

OpxWdV.jpg

 

And now I could finally attach this piece to the main nose assembly:

 

VdQ7WS.jpg

 

I've already run some Mr. Surfacer 500 around the join, but it probably needs one more go. I use the "no sand" technique of using a cotton bud moistened with Mr. Color Thinner to remove the excess putty. It's a much neater and cleaner solution than sanding, but occasionally you'll remove too much, and have to reapply some.

 

I'm operating on the assumption that the radiator grille in the chin intake was probably painted the underside colour; anybody know for sure?

 

Next up we have the cockpit, and I want to add a disclaimer up front: most of what I've done here is discretionary fantasy. I started with the intention of creating an accurate rendition, but it turns out the kit's cockpit sidewalls are totally inaccurate for a Buchon, and the conversion set doesn't supply any replacements. Plus, most of the photos I could find show relatively modern restorations, so I just decided to make it look interesting, and leave it at that. If you want an accurate Buchon (or even Bf 109G) cockpit, don't follow my example below!

 

The main cockpit insert is from the resin set, while the trim wheels, rudder pedals, and control column are from the kit:

 

XK74uD.jpg

 

zzijRo.jpg

 

GgMpln.jpg

 

I originally placed the rudder pedals at too-steep an angle, where they interfered with the forward bulkhead that's still to be added. So I had to break them off and reattach them, only to discover that the starboard one is now a little crooked. Oh well. I'm still deciding whether to add foot straps to them or not.

 

Cockpit side walls are the kit parts:

 

rDYqAl.jpg

 

4e5hcr.jpg

 

Still shaking off the rust with my brush painting, so I tried to keep things simple. Not my best work, but should be adequate under a closed canopy. Instrument decals and placards are from airscale. The yellow fuel line shouldn't even be there for a Merlin engine!

 

I just need to assemble and add the HGW lap belts to the seat pan before I can close up the back end of the fuselage.

 

Lastly, a shot of the finished prop, sans spinner, given a nice even coat of Mr. Surfacer Black:

 

xYmHw0.jpg

 

Did the Buchons carry any kind of prop logo on the blades?

 

Thanks as always for looking!

 

Kev

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Thanks a HEAP!, Kevin

 

'I've already run some Mr. Surfacer 500 around the join . . . a cotton bud moistened with Mr. Color Thinner to remove the excess putty.'

Mr. Surfacer is a putty and not a paint?

 

'Still shaking off the rust with my brush painting,'

I know what you mean.  Still, everything looks good.

 

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Mark

 

 

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1 hour ago, dodgem37 said:

'I've already run some Mr. Surfacer 500 around the join . . . a cotton bud moistened with Mr. Color Thinner to remove the excess putty.'

 

Mr. Surfacer is a putty and not a paint?

 

It comes in a range of viscosities, and the higher the number, the thinner and finer the liquid. When fresh, the 500 variety (the thickest) is virtually a liquid putty; you can thin it for airbrushing, but if you're going to do that, it makes more sense to start with one of the thinner varieties (1000+), or just use one of their rattle cans.

 

In my case, the jar is quite old, and has thickened up considerably; I had to use some lacquer thinner to bring it back to a semi-liquid state. This made it even more effective as a liquid putty, but being solvent-based, it shrinks somewhat as it dries, which makes it a bit of a pain to use when trying to completely eliminate gaps. It's perfect for my use here, though, as it shrinks back into the gaps, and helps bring them back to looking more like panel lines, in keeping with the rest of the surface detail on the model.

 

GSF285.jpg

 

Kev

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Hey Kev,

 

i sincerely enjoy all all your efforts going on here however, this is like looking at a nice 1969 Jaguar XKE being hacked and re-engineered to fit a not so good fitting Daimler Benz.  Maybe a VW with a Triumph engine?   Just so wrong on many account man,   Lol.   Nonetheless, enjoying this build.   (Seriously I’m impressed with the determination).  

 

Looking forward to that fictitious livery she will eventually sport.

 

 I sat inside a lot of these machines in my youth.  I always remember the weight of the armored canopy pulling it down to the normal position.   Heavy, heavy, heavy!   I can’t imagine popping this open in a normal flight condition hence the jettison release handle. 

 

Thanks for posting Kev!   Looking good. 

 

Troy 

 

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Hi

 

The hole on top of the box where the MG151 used to be on the G version is not for an instrument, it's a lightening hole

 

And to be accurate, on a BoB Buchon, the avionic box was not installed, so that was just an empty frame basically

 

And (you will hate me) your thottle quadrant is not installed with the correct orientation

 

That central assembly looks suspiciously identical to the one i mastered for Grey Matter. Not cool  :hmmm:

 

V

Edited by Vincent/MDC

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7 hours ago, Vincent/MDC said:

Hi

 

The hole on top of the box where the MG151 used to be on the G version is not for an instrument, it's a lightening hole

 

And to be accurate, on a BoB Buchon, the avionic box was not installed, so that was just an empty frame basically

 

And (you will hate me) your thottle quadrant is not installed with the correct orientation

 

That central assembly looks suspiciously identical to the one i mastered for Grey Matter. Not cool  :hmmm:

 

V

 

Thanks, Vincent. Not sure if I'll be able to remove the throttle quadrant for reattachment, but I can always paint over the decal. I'm no accuracy nut, but I'm happy to fix simple mistakes like this.

 

Kev

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