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DeanKB

Ideal Workbench Height

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As some of you may be aware, I'm building a modelling den in the garden, AKA a shed.

 

To save space, my workbench will be supported by some industrial strength brackets. This is all good, as the space saved will allow stash storage, and you can never have too much stash storage. Except that the height will be fixed once it's installed.

 

So, my question is....what is the right height for a workbench? 

 

Is there a "correct" height, doesn't it really matter, or does it depend upon the modellers height? Is it a personal thing, or have we independently, unwittingly, settled on roughly the same height?

 

I'm screwing the workbench to the walls next Wednesday, so any input before then will be gratefully accepted.

 

What height is your bench?

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I personally think 36-40 inches works good (about .9 to 1M) so my eyes can be closer to bench level. When I was rigging my Snipe, I had it stacked on two boxes to get it to eye level. I really would love to have an adjustable height workbench like some office desks are.

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Dean I like to stand while I'm airbrushing and seated when assembling, so given that a good standing ht would be 42" to the top surface of the counter. On the other hand a good desk ht. is 30"

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I use a 6ft computer table that’s adjustable. There’s a crank on the side. Sometimes I work standing sometimes I work sitting and sometimes I work in between. 

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30" or so seems pretty much standard, but I also choose a sitting position that's comfortable for me (pneumatic chair, then add a few inches above my knees to that height). My old man-cave benches were roughly 30", if I recall correctly. My new benches here, hopefully to be completed this fall, will be roughly 30" also. As long as my thighs are horizontal, and my feet are comfortably on the floor, I can easily sit for hours at the bench.

 

mb9opK.jpg

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Mine is at standing height (as has been my computer desk for the past 5 years).  I have a saddle type stool that reaches that height, but I stand more than I sit.  When I quit sitting at my computer, a lot of my lower back problems went away.  You need a good quality shock absorber pad if you're going to stand, but I highly recommend it.

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I have a double bench made from two inner house doors in an "L" shape. I initially tried a fully stand-up workbench, but found that when I do get to the bench, its often in large blocks of several hours, and if I've got the day/night to myself, I can spend 4 or 5 hours there, and standing constantly for that long is just not an option for me.

 

For this reason, I put my paint booth at stand-up height, and put my two work benches at normal card table playing height (whatever that actually turns out to be). This has worked well for me now for almost 10 years.

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Bench height is not as important as your chair hopefully one thats good on your back which is adjustable to where you want to be in relation to your work. I have two work areas a workbench height and a normal desk height.

My tool of choice was a Stokke Balans swivel Image result for stokke balans chairNot cheap but bloody good, bought it when I finished in mining, there is no end of good chairs available now.

 

Bob

 

 

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FWIW

 

Mine is 41" which is great to stand at or sit on a high chair. I use my old adjustable drafting chair from back when drawings were actually drawings.

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One thing I have noticed over the years is that it is better to sit very low relative to your work surface.  Or to put it another way,  bring the work surface way up, higher than normal.

 

It saves your back, and is what watch makers do when they are doing detailed work all day long, just as we modelers tend to do.


So I would work this principle into your calculations in some manner.

 

Look at these folks at Rolex...note how high that work surface  is.  

 

1200x800.jpg

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