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DeanKB

New Modelling Den

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Posted (edited)

My current modelling den in the attic is being repurposed, so I've been ever so slowly building a new one in the garden. And I mean slowly. Months and months and months.

 

And I also mean "I". I've done the entire thing on my todd. That was fine, until I had to but the walls up. Gee, that was fun....

 

First I did the base, 16ft by 8ft, using 5 by 2 pressure treated timber, using concrete blocks laid on 18 inches of compounded gravel. 

 

It was bloody hard work, as my manual labour skills are non existent.

 

I had to trim the decking on the right, lift up some of the brick path and level the plot, which was anything but level. About 24 wheelbarrow loads of earth were moved. My poor back.

THCV8L.jpg

 

Then, I had to insulate the actual shed base - I used 25mm, foil backed PIR insulation on the underside, in between the joists:

 

gnMx52.jpg

 

That's 4 ft's worth, so 4 of them were required.

 

Then the walls and roof have to go up before it rains. Which it will.

 

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Roof was pretty strong, due to solid supports:

 

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Then the t&g roof goes on, with 50mm of PIR insulation going on top of the t&g, then roofing felt, then shingles, to make sure it's insulated & waterproof.


The shingles were a killer. Good job the roof was strong, because I was standing on it, hammering in 60mm clouting nails, applying mastic like fun. Never, ever become a roofer, it's very, very hard work.

 

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Then, some wax ducksback paint sprayed on, because it has been known to rain in Cardiff. The colour was the wife's choice, obviously. Something about blending in?

PpBXO2.jpg

 

Then insulating the walls, first with a breathable, waterproof fabric, followed by yet more more 25mm PIR insulation;

 

40NsBa.jpg

 

And this weekend, I've been fitting the guttering on the outside, and the 6mm MDF board inside. I've got no photos for that yet, because I'm too knackered to lift the phone up.

 

But, assuming I don't drop dead, I'm on course to get my actual modelling bench and paraphernalia in by the weekend!!! Which is rather a lot.

 

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I've got industrial brackets to hold the workbench, which should free up some valuable space under the bench because I'll not need the trestles any longer, but I may struggle to squeeze the stash in.

 

PS - I have a new-found respect for manual workers. I always knew it was hard work - as an accountant, I suffered the odd paper cut in my time - but I have been in actual, proper agony afterwards.

 

PPS - I have got some quotes to run an electricity cable in from the fusebox, 20m away. Cheapest so far, £490! 

 

Argh!!

 

I should have been an electrician.

Edited by DeanKB

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Looks excellent, Dean. Unlike you, I actually enjoy that type of work quite a lot. For you to trench and run underground conduit by yourself, should be a snap, given your apparent other skills. As to additional storage, it looks like you could have some loft space available, should you choose to add it. Nice job, and I'll look forward to the fitted out version.

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50 minutes ago, LSP_K2 said:

Looks excellent, Dean. Unlike you, I actually enjoy that type of work quite a lot. For you to trench and run underground conduit by yourself, should be a snap, given your apparent other skills. As to additional storage, it looks like you could have some loft space available, should you choose to add it. Nice job, and I'll look forward to the fitted out version.

Unfortunately, any new, permanent electrical connection must either be done by a suitably qualified electrician, or signed of by the local council. They want £290 just to come out and sign it off. I've priced the materials - 20m of armoured cable, RCD Consumer unit, sockets, cabling, light fitting, etc - at around £150-£200. Electricians know this, so I suspect they just add £290 onto their cost of materials, knowing full well it'll still be cheaper, quicker & safer for me to employ them.

 

I could conceivably do the work - the armoured cable would be attached to the fence, rather than in a trench - but when we come to sell the house, we'll not have the work signed off and that'll cause problems.

 

That, and there's a decent chance I'd kill myself.

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Yes, if you're concerned about it being inspected and up to code (the two not necessarily being mutually exclusive), you may well be better off to just pay to have it done. As you rightfully point out, selling the house, if the inspector(s) are competent, may be a real issue if the work was not previously permitted and inspected; that's the way it works here anyway. I do a fair amount of electrical work here where I live, and while it is all code compliant, I never have it inspected.

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4 minutes ago, Rick Griewski said:

Is the stash moving or staying put? For me this would be just about right size for the bench/build area.

 

Rick

The stash is moving with me.

 

The shed is around 11.5 meters squared - around 125 square feet in US money. It actually feels quite roomy inside.

 

The workbench is 2.7m by 0.8m, so just over 2 square meters, or about 23 square feet.

 

So, in theory, I can set up the workbench and still have around 9 meters squared, or about 100 square feet, left. This should give me enough room to move, stick in a dedicated painting booth (which will be pretty small anyway), a comfy little sofa and have the stash stored under the workbench (as it'll be supported by brackets, freeing up room currently taken by trestles) and against the back wall behind me - I'll be facing the windows.

 

Time will tell, but I may have to split the stash, with any "spare" stash going to another loft. But one of the reasons I've insulated the shed so well is to protect the stash from dampness.

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2 minutes ago, LSP_K2 said:

Yes, if you're concerned about it being inspected and up to code (the two not necessarily being mutually exclusive), you may well be better off to just pay to have it done. As you rightfully point out, selling the house, if the inspector(s) are competent, may be a real issue if the work was not previously permitted and inspected; that's the way it works here anyway. I do a fair amount of electrical work here where I live, and while it is all code compliant, I never have it inspected.

I do simple things like adding sockets to existing circuits and simple stuff like that, as it's allowed. It when you have a permanent, new electricity connection that the fun starts.

 

I do find the work enjoyable insofar as I get a sense of satisfaction when I'm doing it - especially as I've not done anything like that in the past - but the pain I find myself in afterwards, for days at a time sometimes, counteracts the enjoyment so much as to completely overwhelm it!


Still, in this instance, my motivation was to continue to have my own hobby space. I think I have been suitably motivated!

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2 hours ago, Kagemusha said:

Nice set up Dean, unless you have a heater on quite frequently, it's still going to get cold and damp, might be an idea to take the decals out and keep them in the house.

I agree - the insulation on its own won't be sufficient, I'll still need a heat source of some sort.

 

I've got a space heater that'll be on a timed switch. Not sure for how long - I'll experiment with times & temperatures - but enough to to maintain a reasonable temperature. I've got a security camera linked into the wi-fi, a heater plugged into a remotely switched, timed socket, and a thermometer, so I'll keep a close eye on things, at least to start with. There must be apps around to help with that sort of thing?

 

That's where the insulation will come in really useful, and hopefully pay for itself eventually.  I've eliminated any air gaps or water sources, but the insulation will be best if it's helping to maintain a temperature, rather than just minimising temperature losses, which physics suggests it'll struggle to do unaided. Similarly, a heat source without adequate insulation will end up just heating up the garden. Great for the squirrels & hedgehogs!

 

The windows will have secondary double glazing fitted as well, and the roof insulation in particular will stop the shed heating up too much on the 3 days of the year it gets too warm in Wales. Ha ha.

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Progress!

 

xsPyiU.jpg

 

I've painted the reverse of the boards with waterproofer, hence the white colour.

 

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My workspace is as tidy as my workbench!!

 

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Hopefully, the eventual view from my workbench - have to finish boarding above the windows & add the secondary glazing, then I can start setting up the workspace by fitting the workbench brackets against the wall and bringing the stash in, which hopefully will end up with me doing some actual modelling!

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I wondered why I was in so much pain after putting the shed up.

 

I had a pain in my knee that was stopping me from kneeling down. So I went to the physio, he reckons I've damaged my cartilage.

 

So, off to the docs to get an MRI booked, then probably some keyhole surgery.

 

This has reduced progress to continental-drift like speeds.

 

Getting older is so much fun.

 

 

 

 

 

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By the way, the insulation works very well. We've two sheds in the garden. Today, during temperatures of 26 Centigrade (79 Fahrenheit), the shed was lovely and cool, whilst the old shed was too hot to stand in for very long.

 

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24 minutes ago, Marcel111 said:

Very nice job on the hobby den. Hope your knee recovers quickly!

 

Agreed. Take care of the knee, for sure.

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