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Hobbyboss B-24: no turret fix in sight

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3 hours ago, Propwash said:

About a month ago, I contacted Profimodeller and inquired if they were going to bring out any upgrade parts for the HK B-24, specifically, the turrets and engines.  They replied yes, they were considering it.  Nothing from them since then, but all of you might want to send them a message stating you interest to give them some further encouragement.  We just might be pleasantly surprised.

 

As for scratchbuilding, that's fine for those of you who have the skills.  Unfortunately, I don't.  My attempts at scratchbuilding usually end up looking like a pre-schooler's craft project. 

 

I did that too...

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How about instead of complaining about a lack of a fix coming, approach a reputable company and commission them to design and produce the fix that you so desire if you lack the skills to do it yourself?

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They I can only speak for myself, but I dont consider what is going on here complaining.

I for one consider engaging a company like Profimodeller a proactive thing. 

I know in my case, I do not possess the needed disposable income to get a 3rd party to print/mold something like turrets.

 

Those polished turrets do look great! I only wish the nose turret was a bit more accurate.

I was hoping that may have been a  part of an AM upgrade kit.

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15 hours ago, thierry laurent said:

Your observation is generally correct but out of place in that specific case. "the clear parts are an easy fix"? Come on! Have you the kit and did you look at the parts? Plug molding such parts? You must be kidding! Did you look closely at the size and shapes of the parts? 

If this is so simple, why not producing tons of them and selling them to the "assemblers" ? I am not one assembler. I made very complex resin master parts and do not hesitate to scratchbuild anything but can do the difference between the use of classical modelling techniques and solving a very challenging problem than requires more than normal tooling. I would really appreciate the people who underestimate the issue to have a closer look at that rather than considering that people who are hoping for a solution are just "assemblers"! In any case that discussion is becoming pointless. There is an obvious issue with the turrets and there is an opportunity for an aftermarket actor. Is this going to result in a product stays to be demonstrated. The DIY practical solution I considered was as far as I know never mentioned: replacing only sections of the turrets. This option asks for a far simpler production of replacement parts but a far more complex conversion and assembly as you would have to saw the sections to replace out of the clear parts and create with thin plastic strips a structure to support the new sections. This is not for the faint at heart either! So, no, there is no "easy" solution, alas! 

Im a modelmaker and solved it exactly as i said it could be done, i modelmake for fun because when i get home from working on real aircraft design, no momey in the world could buy my spare time and i dont care to use it making parts for other people...

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6 hours ago, Out2gtcha said:

They I can only speak for myself, but I dont consider what is going on here complaining.

I for one consider engaging a company like Profimodeller a proactive thing. 

I know in my case, I do not possess the needed disposable income to get a 3rd party to print/mold something like turrets.

 

Those polished turrets do look great! I only wish the nose turret was a bit more accurate.

I was hoping that may have been a  part of an AM upgrade kit.

Is the turret a bit bulged? Maybe it’s the way I’m looking at it but it looks a bit too rounded, Nice job on the clear parts- no hiding those seems though!

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6 hours ago, Markjames1968 said:

Im a modelmaker and solved it exactly as i said it could be done, i modelmake for fun because when i get home from working on real aircraft design, no momey in the world could buy my spare time and i dont care to use it making parts for other people...

 

You design "real airplane parts"...Well good for you..."A man's got to do something for a living...."  "Dyin ain't much of a livin boy."  Sorry, I digress...got The Outlaw Josey Wales on the brain. There are a lot of us in this community (me included) that are now or have been directly involved in the design, manufacture, operation and maintenance of REAL aircraft so your chest-beating statement doesn't carry much weight around here (at least as far as I'm concerned it's just chutzpah).  On the contrary, it gives me the impression that you think you're better than we...which I assure you, you are not....  However, I will give you the benefit of the doubt as written text is at best, hard to determine inflection and meaning.  Having said that:

 

You cherry-picked one topic but totally missed the main point of Thierry's post as I understand it, so let me attempt to clarify:   MANY of us, for whatever reasons, cannot do what you did, nor have the time to do what you did since our "modelmaking" time may in fact be more limited than yours.  I didn't think I needed to say this but:  Skill, while learned, is grounded in a basic talent which is NOT equally distributed among humans.   Therefore, those that do NOT possess the innate abilities or learned skills to create such things rely on others that do or go without.  Those people so able and skilled may also see an opportunity to create a little revenue for themselves in the process....  That's what's called, in plain English, entrepreneurial spirit.  I wouldn't expect a "real aircraft design" person to understand that though so suffice to say, peeps like makin money.

 

 

Edited by Juggernut

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The only reason People cant do something is because they never try, some  through lazines, some through lack of adventure. Anybody that has a go at something and pereveres  will eventually succeed if they put effort in  , i only mentioned my job as a way of pointing out that i work for a living all week  (i could be a bin man, its not the point)  and my spare time is too precious to spend making stuff for others.

no one is good at making models straight away on our first attempt, you get better the more you build

 

practice makes perfect,  waiting for someone else to do something will teach you nothing and advance your skills not one little bit, dont look for entreprenurial spirit in others, find the adventrous spirit and effort within yourself

 

im not better than anyone, and there are far far better on here than i , but i can assure you its because they have put more effort in than me and done more and tried not because they were perfect at it immediately , or waited for others to defend them or do it for them.

Edited by Markjames1968

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I am remembering that Chris Wilson (aka Zactoman) clearly explained that vacforming such large parts was very difficult and for months he could not get any satisfying result. Moreover, he did not find a good subcontractor for years to produce again good canopies. I am also remembering the post from Paul Fisher about the crazy process to make his resin canopies. Both of them are exceptional modellers and making kits and conversion sets is their daily work. I cannot stop some people to think that is a just a matter of effort but my own experience is simply confirming the feedbacks of Chris and Paul. 

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1 hour ago, thierry laurent said:

I am remembering that Chris Wilson (aka Zactoman) clearly explained that vacforming such large parts was very difficult and for months he could not get any satisfying result. Moreover, he did not find a good subcontractor for years to produce again good canopies. I am also remembering the post from Paul Fisher about the crazy process to make his resin canopies. Both of them are exceptional modellers and making kits and conversion sets is their daily work. I cannot stop some people to think that is a just a matter of effort but my own experience is simply confirming the feedbacks of Chris and Paul. 

 

I generally agree. I have a vac machine, and I have been vacing parts with my father for his RC hobby since I was a kid. 

If clarity and a perfect finish are not necessary, then yes, vacing a part is only a matter of putting in some effort toward it.

If clarity and a flawless finish are needed (say as in a clear vac part for a 32nd scale model about 5 or 10 times smaller) then no, effort and desire alone are in fact not enough.

 

If one has the ability to make crystal clear vac parts, or better yet crystal clear resin parts, when the likes of Paul Fisher or Chris cant do it, I would say that is a talent and skill that I would put to use immediately to make myself those parts.

Otherwise, for the rest of us, other than Paul and Chris who are professionals at this type of thing and still cant do it on a regular basis,  it's going to come down to someone else who has the secret putting a clear set out.

 

After decades of pulling vacs w/my father, and after speaking with Paul about the process on his 100P for clear resin, I dont know much, but I know 100% that it isnt for a lack of effort or desire.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Markjames1968 said:

practice makes perfect,  waiting for someone else to do something will teach you nothing and advance your skills not one little bit, dont look for entreprenurial spirit in others, find the adventrous spirit and effort within yourself

 

 

Couldnt have said it any better myself. I try and do something different in each of my builds and try a new technique or method. I can garauntee that the pile of failures to get the perfect result quickly stack up, but persistence and innovation always win the day. With the advent of pre coloured resin instrument panels (Eduard ‘look’) and the prefabricated, ready to attach to the model wooden propellers, I think that genuine modelling skill is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. Too many people don’t want to put in the effort, delaying building the model whilst they wait for someone else to essentially do it for them.

 

 

 

 

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I dont believe the posts by Eric etc are condescending at all.

If anything they are trying “encourage” people to try rather than insult anyone by some margin.

Did anyone pick up an airbrush ever and paint a perfect German mottle on their first go? Ever?

Skill is earnt not given.

Talent is one thing but no amount of talent ever sent any pilot solo on their first flight. 

I can guarrantee not trying is a certain way to NEVER improve.

If there is no mainstream injected detail set come then the method demonstrated might be our only choice. Having polished many centreline seams on modern fighter canopies realistically can it be any more difficult or critical than a huge line in the middle of a bubble canooy?

 

Edited by Darren Howie

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OK. I will try to clarify my point a last time. There is a difference between effort/practice and required tooling to reach a goal. You can try to produce dozens of identical shells from a plastic stick with a Dremel and files. You will not get two dozens of identical ones without at least months of practice whereas you can do that easily with a computer-controlled lathe in hours. That clear part situation is the typical case where you need a lot of effort/practice AND dedicated uncommon tooling that needs years to be refined to produce the correct result. I propose the modellers who consider that problem to be a non-existing one to demonstrate in a WIP how they will solve THAT specific problem with just effort and reasonable tooling. A lot of modellers (and possibly assemblers) will be very grateful to learn from them. Thanks in advance. 

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