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Pup7309

Priming WNW and other kits..?

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Hi

I was priming a few WNW kits with Mr Surfacer 1200 and wondering if I should bother, maybe a wash is enough? They seem to have a reasonably mattish surface (Unlike other kit makes which have a shiny surface.)

 

What do you think?

 

Also airbrushing vs. brush painting?  I like to brush paint for control but  imagine a can of spray paint would save a heap of time.

 

Thanks :D

 

Edited by Pup7309

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Generally it’s not needed pup.

 

Infact the tolerances are so tight on those kits that any extra paint will cause fit problems if not scraped away.

 

There are some paints however you would need to prime first such as Vajello.....if you are airbrushing the color.

 

Ryan

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Yes you can get away without priming them. I generally mist on a fine coat of the Tamiya I'm using thinned with lacquer thinners then spray over that. If black basing I use alclad black or stynylrez primer, on the main airframe. For metal parts I prime with alclad black.

 

if you can see flow in the plastic parts, as you do occasionally, prime it well as it shows through.

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I never prime models. The only times I used primer was as a base for Alclad. Your hands are covered with natural oils. When you handle parts, you leave a residue of these oils all over. Paint will not stick to that. I always wipe all parts with a degreaser. My favourite is Tec7 Degreaser, it does not attack plastic or paint. Regular model paints (I use Tamiya, Gunze, Lifecolor) stick really well to clean surfaces. 

Radu 

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Agreed on most counts. WnW kits really only need to be wiped down and de-tact as I have had luck with this using even 90% alcohol.

 

I'd say generally if its decent IM plastic I don't prime. Its just one more layer to clog details.

The only time I regularly prime a model is when it's full resin.

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The only time that I prime a kit is when it is resin or of mixed construction otherwise a good polish  and clean up are all I do.

 

Cheers

 

Dennis

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I still prime with Armory Grey primer.   I usually brush paint the kits, unless airbrushing is called for for some of the German camo patterns.  Seems to work well.

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I like to do a lot of filter/wash/weathering work with oil based stuff, so I like to use primer paint.

 

I have found that skipping primer can lead to the paint coming off in areas if you do enough working of the paint with oil based products.

 

If you don't do that sort of thing, I can see where skipping primer would be OK.

 

To the OP:  You'll need to remove paint from all surfaces to be joined (usually the edge of parts) whether you prime or not.  Do you have an airbrush?  It sounds like your 2 options are brush or spray can.  Neither is really ideal.  In some areas you can get away with blasting away with a spray can, but I'd probably almost prefer using a brush with well thinned paint, and using brands that paint well such as Life Color or Vallejo, deliberately avoiding the Tamiya acrylics called for in the instructions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, ringleheim said:

I like to do a lot of filter/wash/weathering work with oil based stuff, so I like to use primer paint.

 

I have found that skipping primer can lead to the paint coming off in areas if you do enough working of the paint with oil based products.

 

If you don't do that sort of thing, I can see where skipping primer would be OK.

 

To the OP:  You'll need to remove paint from all surfaces to be joined (usually the edge of parts) whether you prime or not.  Do you have an airbrush?  It sounds like your 2 options are brush or spray can.  Neither is really ideal.  In some areas you can get away with blasting away with a spray can, but I'd probably almost prefer using a brush with well thinned paint, and using brands that paint well such as Life Color or Vallejo, deliberately avoiding the Tamiya acrylics called for in the instructions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi 

Thanks for all your replys. 2 schools of thought on priming! Sounds like unless oil based work most prefer to skip this stage. 

My old compressor packed it in and I have gone back to brushing until I get a new one. Actually don’t mind it. Think I might get a good one like an Iwata next time. (Any suggestions?)

 

I have been using Tamiya paints as per instructions. Vallejo are good? Comments on another forum saying they take too long to dry and can peel off killed my curiosity. This is not the case?

 

Thanks again!

:D

 

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50 minutes ago, Pup7309 said:

Hi 

Thanks for all your replys. 2 schools of thought on priming! Sounds like unless oil based work most prefer to skip this stage. 

My old compressor packed it in and I have gone back to brushing until I get a new one. Actually don’t mind it. Think I might get a good one like an Iwata next time. (Any suggestions?)

 

I have been using Tamiya paints as per instructions. Vallejo are good? Comments on another forum saying they take too long to dry and can peel off killed my curiosity. This is not the case?

 

Thanks again!

:D

 

Vallejo are really nice paints for brush painting, as are Life Color from Italy.  MiG and AK Interactive are similar. 

 

Tamiya's acrylic range is notorious for being difficult to brush paint with.

 

I really dislike airbrushing the brushable paints mentioned above, but for brushing the old fashioned way, they work really well.

 

For airbrushing, Tamiya are fantastic, especially if thinned with Mr. Color leveling thinner, which is my go-to approach for air brushing.  So I use different paints depending on if I'm using the airbrush or the old fashioned paintbrush.

 

I think any of the mainstream Iwata compressors would work well.  I have an Iwata Smart Jet which is now nearly 10 years old, and I use it all the time.  It keeps marching along like a champ and does what I need it to do for modeling applications.

 

Good luck with the project!

 

 

 

 

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31 minutes ago, LSP_K2 said:

I almost invariably use a primer of some sort, usually a sandable lacquer and always before I spray any acrylics.

 

Yes true.

 

I shoot a coat most of the time to check seams etc.

 

Nothing beats a shot of Tamiya white primer to make molded seam lines stand out on a gear leg or other tubular part that needs cleaned up.

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21 minutes ago, Ryan said:

 

Yes true.

 

I shoot a coat most of the time to check seams etc.

 

Nothing beats a shot of Tamiya white primer to make molded seam lines stand out on a gear leg or other tubular part that needs cleaned up.

Tamiya spray can primer is great, but kind of expensive.  It is amazing how fast you can blast away with a spray can, though, and have the primer step finished if you are in a rush and can get outdoors for a moment.  Or have a great ventilation booth I suppose. 

 

I almost always prime with the airbrush, Mr. Color leveling thinner, and Mr. Surfacer 1200 or 1500.

 

I like that I can control the thickness of the paint depending on what I'm doing.

 

 

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I agree that it depends on the build and the final paint. I use enamels almost exclusively, and I use lacquer based primer to fill scratches and the like before final sanding, or if i'm painting a light color over a dark plastic, for filling in details I don't want, that sort of thing. On a kit as nice as WNW or Tamiya and molded in a nice gray, then probably not. 

 

Tim

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I always mist a light coat of Tamiya primer from the rattle can over my wingnut builds just to give the colour coats something to bite in to. If its a kit with far better tolerances engineered in rather than the ridiculously tight or non existant ones that WnW have then I give the parts a couple of light coats of primer.

 

Can't imagine what it's going to like getting a WnW Lancaster fuselage to fit together with all of the sub assemblies fitted inside with the tolerances they run at.

 

Regards.Andy 

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