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is it windy yet?

Corsair, can it have one wing up and the down?

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In the F4U video that Jonathan produced in a previous lifetime, they got lots of period film from the National Archives, including a bunch of Navy film introducing the Corsair to the troops, as well as films from Chance Vought.  I watched them last night, and in the sequences that show the wings folding or unfolding, in every case both wings folded and unfolded simultaneously.  Not saying it couldn't have happened (it obviously did), but it was in no way a "normal" operation, and you simply don't see photos of it happening aboard the carriers.    The only time I can see it being necessary would be on the hangar deck if something needed to be done on one wing, and there wasn't room to spread both wings.  Never seen even a single photo of one wing up and one wing down on the flight deck during WWII.  

 

I know the RN did that with Sea Furies during the Korean War to save deck space.  The spread wing was hanging over the deck edge, with the inboard wing folded.  

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I'm sure that RN Corsairs (At least) had a L-Both-R Button. I've seen photos of them parked parallel to the deck edge where the over-hanging wing was left down as it's in no-ones way over the sea, yet the inboard one is down in case of a follow on landing aircraft. I'm also sure that as a Wildcat wing fold is manual, it could be asymmetric but v. rare as it would over-balance the machine on windy deck.

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15 hours ago, MikeMaben said:

2 short videos ...

 

Both wings simultaneous...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQxb-V-rZqA&ytbChannel=null

 

One wing at a time ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vvbF7IumME

 

 

 

FYI, according to cockpit pictures, the USN Corsairs had a single lever that was marked "Spread-Neutral-Fold" next to it was a lockout lever so it wasn't accidentally tripped. What you are seeing in the second video is probably a tired hydraulic pump or possibly air trapped in the system. As you see, both wings start to spread, but when the left wing tips over and starts to drop, the weight of the wing pulls on the hydraulic cylinder, causing a temporary pull, resulting in a drop in pressure, which made the right wing stop moving. As soon as the pump caught up, the right wing started moving down again. 

 

Its feasible that in the neutral position, the locks can be disengaged and manually fold the wing. Its also possible that the Royal Navy asked for separate L/R levers.

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When I researched the same question when doing this one

f4u-1d_3.jpg?w=2000&h=

i found out that it was indeed possible, but both small doors at mid section should be up, not only the one with the raised wing.

 

Like in this picture, clearly seen on the starboard wing in red
f4u-6.jpg

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The later (-5 and onward) Corsairs had a lot of differences from earlier variants.  It wouldn't surprise me that they added the capability to fold the wings independently.  You just don't see that on US carriers during WWII.

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4 hours ago, 1to1scale said:

 

FYI, according to cockpit pictures, the USN Corsairs had a single lever that was marked "Spread-Neutral-Fold" next to it was a lockout lever so it wasn't accidentally tripped. What you are seeing in the second video is probably a tired hydraulic pump or possibly air trapped in the system. As you see, both wings start to spread, but when the left wing tips over and starts to drop, the weight of the wing pulls on the hydraulic cylinder, causing a temporary pull, resulting in a drop in pressure, which made the right wing stop moving. As soon as the pump caught up, the right wing started moving down again. 

 

Its feasible that in the neutral position, the locks can be disengaged and manually fold the wing. Its also possible that the Royal Navy asked for separate L/R levers.

 

I just posted the videos to show that depending on when a snapshot

was taken (like the one of 313) it's possible to see one wing down while

the other was still up (as part of the normal process).   

 

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