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LF period ventral views of 109s with oil stains

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13 hours ago, Hardcore said:

I am not sure that was case. The GM-1 was rare after all. Only the high altitude variants was so equipped, and only by conversion. 

 

I don't think it was all that rare but I'm could have been thinking of MW-50 ,

same function but for lower altitudes. I do remember reading about the

heavy black exhaust they produced. (unless I dreampt it in a dream  :shrug:)

 

 

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15 hours ago, MikeMaben said:

 

I don't think it was all that rare but I'm could have been thinking of MW-50 ,

same function but for lower altitudes. I do remember reading about the

heavy black exhaust they produced. (unless I dreampt it in a dream  :shrug:)

 

 

I know that feeling. Wish my sources were more informative about stuff like that.

Dirty exhaust is what I associate with suboptimal combustion, or impurities in the fuel. Does Nox or MW50 count? Hard to think Water and alcohol would add anything but steam. 

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58 minutes ago, Hardcore said:

I know that feeling. Wish my sources were more informative about stuff like that.

Dirty exhaust is what I associate with suboptimal combustion, or impurities in the fuel. Does Nox or MW50 count? Hard to think Water and alcohol would add anything but steam. 

 

MW50 cools the air charge down, much like a turbo intercooler in a car

 

the aero engine has the supercharger that increases the volumetric efficiency, but no Intercooler 

 

Richard

 

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5 hours ago, RLWP said:

 

MW50 cools the air charge down, much like a turbo intercooler in a car

 

the aero engine has the supercharger that increases the volumetric efficiency, but no Intercooler 

 

Richard

 

Yeah, but does that make the exhaust dirtier? Technically it allows higher compression and better higher efficiency. Isn't that what help making car engines run cleaner??? 

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I think you're right about the fuel quality too,

but the stains were a cumulative thing which

and thus dependent on how often it was cleaned

or not.

 

 

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19 hours ago, Hardcore said:

Yeah, but does that make the exhaust dirtier? Technically it allows higher compression and better higher efficiency. Isn't that what help making car engines run cleaner??? 

 

Without knowing more about the system, it's hard to comment. Did the fuel system chuck in more fuel to match the estimated cooling effect? I guess that's possible, and would be hard to get the quantities right leading to overfuelling

 

Now, can I be bothered to google this?....:P

 

Richard

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6 hours ago, MikeMaben said:

I think you're right about the fuel quality too,

but the stains were a cumulative thing which

and thus dependent on how often it was cleaned

or not.

 

 

That could be another reason it is seen more on later aircraft than early ones. They probably didn't have as much time to worry about it later compared to the higher standards of the early years. 

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40 minutes ago, Hardcore said:

Cleaning a fighter shouldn't have taken many minutes for a crew. 

 

What stage of the war? Under what staffing levels?

 

Towards the end, the Luftwaffe was getting short of everything

 

Richard

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3 hours ago, Hardcore said:

Cleaning a fighter shouldn't have taken many minutes for a crew. 

 

I read Willi Reschke's book about the Wilde Sau towards the end of the war when they had become daylight fighter pilots.  They were losing planes so quickly that they quit painting unit symbols and quit puttying and sanding the wings.   No telling what else the quit doing with their time.  Fighters had to be pushed into the woods to save them from marauding flights of American fighters.

 

And I'm certain the fuel was worse as the war wore on.   Aviation fuel was made from coal, and the facilities that made the fuel were high priority targets.  It's amazing that they had any fuel at all.

 

I'm sure there are countless things that we have barely imagined which changed how ground crew did their jobs.  Heck, with the Luftwaffe ground divisions hungry for men, it's easy to imagine that these ground crewmen weren't always safely miles behind the front.

 

Gaz

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Interesting thing about synthetic fuel: it seems it actually was cleaner than oil based products. At least that is the impression I got from reading on Wikipedia. 

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