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Sparzanza

Question about Revell's Seafire

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My brother recently gave me Revell's Supermarine Seafire in 1/32 scale. It's a very old box; very old release... the decals are completely shot, but the rest of the kit is intact and complete. He told me how he acquired it, but I've forgotten. Anyway.

 

I can't exactly see what differs this "Seafire" from a regular Spitfire Mk1. Three exhaust stacks on each side, 8 machineguns, one large intake underneath, one small.. the only thing I don't really recognize is the shape of its propeller (pointy blades), nosecone, as well as the rims that looks strange.

 

The kit includes a separate sprue with extra parts that supposedly turns it into a Seafire. This includes two teardrop shaped things that supposedly goes on its wings (after drilling holes in them), as well as a large intake that I thought to be tropical. I think there's cannons for it as well.

 

But will attaching these items truly turn it into a Seafire? The wings will still have 8 hatches in them, just with large blomps that sits smack in the middle of everything without exactly hiding anything.

 

I guess my question is whether there's any point of trying to "convert" this seemingly regular Mk1 or if just building as is and paint as such will suffice.

Edited by Sparzanza

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I will try to explain better.

 

I want to know if there's any point doing the conversion seeing as the Mk1/VB/whatever parts are still clearly visible even when putting the bulges and cannons on the wings. Like I said there'll still be 4 access hatches per wing for the machineguns, instead of what I assume should be like... 3? I want it fully accurate with the parts provided, or not at all.

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If you want a more accurate Seafire 1 then you would be better off starting with a better base kit of the Vb than the Revell kit provides.

 

However older Revell kits have a charm of their own so building it nicely OOB would yeild a nice if not too accurate model. 

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I didn't exactly plan to acquire the kit, Plasto - so it's not a question of wanting a better kit. It just arrived in the mail, sent by my brother. I normally don't touch 1/32 stuff, but since I now have it in my possession I figured I might as well throw it together. I won't be trying to convert it into anything since there's additional stuff needed and just leave it as a Mk1/VB/whatever with a pointy propeller and stubby nosecone.

Edited by Sparzanza

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Here's why I think it would be pointless to convert. The question is what exactly would the kit be if one opts not to do this? VB was it? So grey/green scheme?

 

EDIT: no wait, 8 machineguns... Mk1 with VB prop. I guess.

 

I am hopelessly confused.

 

9C74sVf.jpg

Edited by Sparzanza

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A Seafire 1b was basically a Navalised Vb as per the Wikipedia article Mike posted earlier.

 

The old Revell kit is a Spitfire 1a or II or at a pinch in a dark room at 20 paces could pass as a Va....

 

The older Revell kits originate from much gentler times so applying a modern critical lens is probably a bit harsh...

 

Whatever you decide to do with it have fun....

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Well, to me, from a surface detail perspective, this kit is still the best option after the Tamiya kit. Moreover, this kit is the only early Spit with the correct oil cooler.

 

The kit has three drawbacks:

 

The first is the already mentioned lack of gull wing that has already been mentioned but as the plastic is quite thick, it is possible to sand the bottom of the wing and the fairings. So, it is possible to solve that. Forget the Greymatter correction part as if the shapes are OK, the scribed details are horrendous and out of scale.

 

Second, all the details should be replaced: exhausts, cockpit, LG wells, legs and wheels. The exhaust holes are also too large but this may be fixed with plastic strip. Fortunately, there are tons of cheap aftermarket parts that may be used to improve the kit. The only area that was still a major issue up to this year can now be fixed: Aires LG wells dedicated to the new Revell kit may be easily used in that kit. There are early Merlin exhausts from Quickboost. Baraccuda and others released wheels and there are various available pits.

 

The last one is the lack of wheel bump in the upper wing. Note that up to now, only the Hobbyboss kit has more or less accurately shaped bumps. So with regard to that aspect, this early Spitfire is not worse than the Hasegawa or more recent Revell releases.

 

Hence, with a little bit of work and the help of some aftermaket sets, it is possible to release a very nice early Spitfire from that kit.

 

Hth

 

Thierry

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