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Reuben L. Hernandez

Just st wondering about Hasegawa P-47 kits

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Posted (edited)

The P-47M is just a late Block P-47D with a more powerful C-series R-2800 engine that had a distinct bolted crankcase.  If you look at the Hasegawa P-47D-30/40 and P-47M kits, the only difference is the crankcase sprue.

 

https://www.1999.co.jp/eng/image/10066868

 

https://www.1999.co.jp/eng/image/10062573

 

Things like the tail fillet and underwing compressibility flaps were also late D model features, not M specific features.

 

Not really clear why the M model has such mythic status.  Only 133 were built, it was only used by the 56th FG (the only P-47 group in the ETO by that time- almost everyone else swapped to Mustangs), and although mainly developed to counter the V-1, by the time it entered service most of the V-1 sites had been overrun and the threat was minimal.  It was a hot rod, to be sure, but as far as effectiveness, it was probably most useful as a springboard to the long-range P-47N.

Edited by Dave Williams

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27 minutes ago, mhorina said:

It probably has to do with the  decal sheet in the 'M'  boxing. Only thing not in any other boxing.

 

       Mike Horina

 

I don’t think the C-series crankcase in an any other boxing either.  It’s on its own mini-sprue and wouldn’t be applicable to any of the other boxings.

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4 hours ago, Dave Williams said:

The P-47M is just a late Block P-47D with a more powerful C-series R-2800 engine that had a distinct bolted crankcase.  If you look at the Hasegawa P-47D-30/40 and P-47M kits, the only difference is the crankcase sprue.

 

https://www.1999.co.jp/eng/image/10066868

 

https://www.1999.co.jp/eng/image/10062573

 

Things like the tail fillet and underwing compressibility flaps were also late D model features, not M specific features.

 

Not really clear why the M model has such mythic status.  Only 133 were built, it was only used by the 56th FG (the only P-47 group in the ETO by that time- almost everyone else swapped to Mustangs), and although mainly developed to counter the V-1, by the time it entered service most of the V-1 sites had been overrun and the threat was minimal.  It was a hot rod, to be sure, but as far as effectiveness, it was probably most useful as a springboard to the long-range P-47N.

Must be the mystique of the 56th FG and the unusual paint schemes

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1 hour ago, CATCplSlade said:

So, what I'm reading is that if the crankcase difference is hidden inside the cowling then there is no real issue painting a D up as an M?

 

It’s not all that hidden.  The different crankcase is pretty noticeable when viewed from the front, I think.  It’s fairly big, too big to be hidden by the prop, and usually painted gray so it stands out against the much darker engine.  How important the difference is up the the modeler.

 

This is is a standard B series R-2800 with the bullet shaped crankcase.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pratt_%26_Whitney_R-2800_Double_Wasp#/media/File%3APratt_%26_Whitney_R-2800_Engine_1.jpg

 

This is the C series with the fatter cylindrical crankcase with the heavy bolting

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pratt_%26_Whitney_R-2800_Double_Wasp#/media/File%3AHARP_Pratt_%26_Whitney_R-2800_Double_Wasp.JPG

 

 

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Excellent, I have the engine and now I just need to buy the decals.  I built this variant  in 1/48 scale many years ago.  The color sceme is one of my favorites along with the checkered cowls.

 

Rick

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