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Thunda

Straightening bent white metal landing gear

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Wow- what a response. Seems no love for the SAC's gear then? :D

 

Ive thought about going the tube/solder route (Ive got other kits I want to change the landing gear on, such as the PCM Mc202/205), although in the case of the Ju88 theres a soft cover over the oleo leg which would be difficult to reproduce. I do have access to bronze casting, although its generally larger items that are cast in this foundry. Maybe Ill have a go at casting some replacements. I could also 3D print some (I work at a University), but dont think they would be any stronger than the kit parts

 

Ill also have a go with the hot water and see if I can straighten them.

 

Thanks for the input! :hmmm:

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Thundra rest assured. The white metal gear you have cleaned up,sanded, primered, painted in proper RLM colors,installed on your lovely Junkers now has an unfortunately incurable collapsing syndrome with a poor maximum taxi design weight. What a damn shame. Your hard efforts on your Ju-88 should have received a better product treatment.. Rest assured, I’m pretty sure the white metal gear can be purposely reused with a little additive and made into a decent sparkler material for some kids who want to honor Scotland’s Independence Day? Just kindly saying with a bit of humor added.

 

The kit gear would work out better for you unfortunately. I wish you only the best speedy recovery on the junker recovery.

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Thanks Troy. Luckily, a) they were cheap and B) they arent fitted to the kit. Think Im going to try and cast some myself in bronze.

 

And thanks to everyone else for their input- its been enlightening to say the least (!)

 

Glad I got the heads up, because I was going to buy another SAC set for my Revell He219's. The one good thing I had heard about this one was that they had been cast with the weight of the aircraft modelled into them- apparently, the kit ones are too long as theyve been designed fully extended as though the aircraft is airborne and with no weight on the U/C. There is actually a Profimodellor set with brass rods for strengthening the kit legs but Im not sure if it addresses the incorrect oleo length.

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Mmmmm- they look lovely. Unfortunately out of my price range, particularly once you put shipping to the UK on it.

 

One set left.... :crying:

 

 

Honestly I think in this case, with the G-Factor set not an option, I would personally would stick to the OOB gear in that case. Much stiffer than the SAC option, and will in the end make you happier I think. Unless you are using a conversion w/a lot of resin, or a Mistel setup, I think the OOB gear are a better option than the SAC gear. 

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Yeah, think you are right. Still might have a go at casting some in bronze, but bit of a long shot....

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I think i used one of their sets for a 1/48 bf109. It survived being dropped on the floor once, so I have no complaints.

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The worst thing about the SAC gear is them using the SAC emblem on their packaging. What a dishonor to SAC! How they remain in business has got me stumped.

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Yeah, think you are right. Still might have a go at casting some in bronze, but bit of a long shot....

As the guys have been saying I think the metallurgy of the product is that they contain a fair amount of lead. That would make them amenable to soldering if they crack...repairs would be simple but naturally they're not terribly rigid. IIRC the high lead white metals are lower melting point so easier to cast.

 

I'm not sure that hot water would be sufficient. I think you might need a well controlled butane torch. If you load the oleo in the direction would want to bend, it'll move before the metal reaches its critical temperature range and melts.

 

If it was simple enough to slide a brass pipe over the oleo leg it might help keep the rigidity. Or if the model is heavy look to leave the landing gear extended but essentially unweighted.

 

The scratchbuilt brass ones tend to look pretty incredible.

 

HTH Matty

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