Jump to content

Recommended Posts

its actually designed to capture dripped oil and lubricate the gear swing hinges when retracted, as pointed out it wasn't always the most effective.

I was going to replicate this detail as well. carve down some sprue to make "the cup" and hollow it out a bit, the rest is wire or styrene.

 

Its mounted to the gear leg, the rest of the cables springs etc are for the gear doors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Shawn M said:

its actually designed to capture dripped oil and lubricate the gear swing hinges when retracted, as pointed out it wasn't always the most effective.

I was going to replicate this detail as well. carve down some sprue to make "the cup" and hollow it out a bit, the rest is wire or styrene.

 

Its mounted to the gear leg, the rest of the cables springs etc are for the gear doors.

The oil cup is supplied with the kit Shawn, I haven't fitted it yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How detailed do you want it to be? i would make the /---\ shape from a piece of solid brass rod (0.8 or 0.6 mm). Glue both lower ends on the doors and then create the springs from  thin copper wire coiled up on an even thinner rod (brass or styrene). The springs can then be glued to the /---\ shape and to the outer gear support legs. The attachment points can be further detailed with styrene or brass triangles to create a hinge effect. I'll hope it's clear what I describe, otherwise I can make a little drawing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Wouter, I tried this with wire though not thin brass rod, I've give that a go! :)

 

Alain, I put down a base coat of light blue (RLM75) then oversprayed Grey Violet (RLM76) though I may go through some of this with a fine line of light blue later.  I'm pretty happy with it as it is right now though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Max,

I think you meant light blue RLM76 and RLM 75 Grey Violet!

 

Here is the technique I am talking about, shown on the 219 at the Smithsonian museum. A solid coat of 75 over the top surfaces, then wavy 76 lines to leave 75 spots.

 

There are photos of wrecked new 110 with just the solid 75 upper surface. Note the original (darker) paint at the wing root on the 219. You see the style of the original painter was  well respected.

 

RvUI4xa.jpg

 

Ls61Ppp.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×