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Frightening Southwest incident

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Yeah, the whole "hero" thing is so overblown these days.  Everybody who ever served in the military is a "hero" (I can state with 100% certainty they are not - some of them are downright cowardly).  These pilots did exactly what they were trained to do.  The fact that her demeanor on the radio was calm just means she was doing what she was trained to do.  Would you have been surprised if she sounded totally hysterical and out of control?  I hope so.  They practice for this kind of thing in the simulator ALL the time.  They did what their training taught them.  Her gender and her prior flight experience have nothing to do with how she comported herself, and the same for her first officer (who hasn't yet been mentioned that I've heard).

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First off - very sad to hear a passenger suffered a fatal injury - secondly, the entire crew did an outstanding job; nothing special here folks - the TWO pilots did what they are trained for - explosive decompression followed by emergency descent and a single engine landing. The fact that the Captain is female and the first female to operate an F-18 in the US NAVY has nothing to do with the successful outcome of this incident - the media is playing the sensationalism card yet again... and it’s NEVER just one person it’s the TEAM or in other more appropriate terms the CREW that creates a successful outcome through training, discipline and experience.

I’m more concerned about the fatally injured passenger and what caused an uncontained castastrophic engine failure... not about the Captain’s military career.

Cheers

Alan

 

hear hear......

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I'd agree with your statement. What Sully did was experience and unique circumstances. He never should have been treated like he was, but his dedication and professionalism showed what a good pilot and person he is.

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Yep, press rubbish, totally overblown and over the top dross, nothing more than following the drills for decompression and engine failure.

 

The more interesting story is here: 

 

_100936285_046255284.jpg

 

That's the damage from a single blade failure which is supposed to be contained by the fan shroud. Not good

 

Richard

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Yeah, the whole "hero" thing is so overblown these days.  Everybody who ever served in the military is a "hero" (I can state with 100% certainty they are not - some of them are downright cowardly).  These pilots did exactly what they were trained to do.  The fact that her demeanor on the radio was calm just means she was doing what she was trained to do.  Would you have been surprised if she sounded totally hysterical and out of control?  I hope so.  They practice for this kind of thing in the simulator ALL the time.  They did what their training taught them.  Her gender and her prior flight experience have nothing to do with how she comported herself, and the same for her first officer (who hasn't yet been mentioned that I've heard).

 

I once heard some comedian say that to the newspapers, a "hero" is any person who does their job. "Hero" firefighter enters blazing building... Um, yeah? He signed up for that.

 

If I were her, I think I'd be insulted that gender was even a consideration. Ooh, a *woman* did it! Let's give her a special pat on the head. If a person couldn't do it, they don't qualify to sit in the seat. End.

 

However, "Competent aircrew lands fully-functional airplane with one engine not running and a missing window" is a lousy headline. Much better to say "Hundreds nearly perish when engine explodes in mid-air! Screaming passengers nearly sucked out of gaping hole in cabin! Hero woman fighter jock wrestles doomed aircraft to the ground with only one tragic fatality!"

 

I've already spoken to two people who are afraid to fly now.

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Its kind of amazing (yet a bit understandable) that people would be put off of flying by 1 single incident where an accident with pretty low odds took the life of one person. Im not at all trying to diminish that life, but my point is that the odds of one being injured or dying in a plane crash/accident are not "1 in a million" , but more like 1 in 11 million.   Technically its the safest mode of transport. 

 

If one was to be afraid of any mode of transport, id say with odds of dying of 1 in 5 thousand or so, be afraid of walking out and getting in your car to drive. 

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I have personally been involved in one emergency landing of a commercial aircraft, and I caused it - sort of.

 

I was flying from Atlanta to Newark, and it was a very hot day - I think 114F on the ramp. We were stuck on the tarmac because the plane was too heavy to take off with the current temps and the full cabin plus enough fuel to make it non-stop. They asked for volunteers. They threatened to cancel the flight. Eventually enough people got off, but we had been at idle so long we needed to be re-fueled. I was seated on the starboard wing at a window seat, but I didn't pay much attention to the ground crew at the time.

 

Takeoff roll was verrrrrrry long, and the climb-out was probably the worst I've experienced. We finally got to cruising altitude, and I happened to look out my window. That's when I saw fuel streaming out of one of the fuel hatches and vaporizing off the wing. I hit the call button for a flight attendant. She came, asked what I needed, and I silently pointed out the window so as not to cause a panic. She glanced out, her eyes got VERY wide, and she said she'd be right back and headed up front. Moments later, the co-pilot is standing next to me, asking me how my trip is going, what I thought of Atlanta, while all the while looking out the window at the stream of jet fuel. He tells me to have a nice day and walks back up front. A moment later, the PILOT is sitting in the empty seat next to me, and we're chatting about Atlanta traffic while he's leaning past me and looking out the window. Again he wishes me a nice day, gets up, and walks back to the cockpit. Moments later he announces that we're diverting to Cincinnati because the fuel calculations were off. Uh-huh.

 

We landed in a big hurry, with the full honor guard of fire trucks and ambulances and foam, and nobody knew until we were stopped. I'm sure they would have noticed the fuel loss on the gauges at some point and we wouldn't have plummeted out of the sky.

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I've seen a few engine failures in my time and as has been said the debris should be contained within the cowling with it's kevlar mats and all but that has certainly failed big time.

Another thing I used to hear was that during an emergency, one pilot used to do the flying whilst the other used to be responsible for the radio etc.

So in this case could it actually have been the first officer flying ?

Or am I behind the times...............again.

:hmmm:
 

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What the news hasn't picked up on is that this isn't the first incident of this happening with the port engine of a SouthWest 737.  It happened in 2016 as well but no injuries. Not sure if this was a blade failure or just a shroud failure?

 

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I've seen a few engine failures in my time and as has been said the debris should be contained within the cowling with it's kevlar mats and all but that has certainly failed big time.

Another thing I used to hear was that during an emergency, one pilot used to do the flying whilst the other used to be responsible for the radio etc.

So in this case could it actually have been the first officer flying ?

Or am I behind the times...............again.

:hmmm:

 

 

The most nervous I've been flying was on a shuttle flight on Dash 8. My seat was directly in line with the prop and I had visions of a blade flying off and shearing through the cabin. I spent the flight staring at the panels on that cowling and wondering if any of the oil seeps were critical. Just about crapped myself when the doors opened for the gear.

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What the news hasn't picked up on is that this isn't the first incident of this happening with the port engine of a SouthWest 737.  It happened in 2016 as well but no injuries. Not sure if this was a blade failure or just a shroud failure?

 

 

Some news has: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-43818752

 

Richard

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News is news if it's unusual in some way - different. Having a bit of an aeroplane come off, fly through a window, decompress the cabin, partially pull somebody out of the aircraft, who's then pulled back in but subsequently dies, and all the while the pilot is not only female, but a female fighter pilot - well, that's news.

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 I silently pointed out the window so as not to cause a panic.

 

That makes 'you' a HERO !!

 

 

:whistle:

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