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Thunnus

1/32 Trumpeter Me 262A-1a "Yellow 3"

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I love you changed your mind with a base colour and just do it. I've been at that tipping point and once the decision has been firmly made i can soldier on through happy with my new choice. What tipped you over to make the change?

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12 hours ago, MikeMaben said:

 

The slats would be dropped too but that's alotta extra work.

 

                         2Z8AZuO.jpg

 

 

the  trump model does give you seperate flaps.  they were usually raised by  the ground crew when on the ground although I have seen mix and  match.  I think for a repainted in the field ac  the area under the flaps is probably camo color at least it is on the nasm ac.  I think they would research their ac  carefully as well

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Thanks guys!  Landing gear will be down.  I chose to pose the leading edge slats in the closed position because (a) it looks cleaner, IMO and (b) it was simpler to do than posing them dropped.  It was at a point where I wanted to move this build along and I made a number of decisions that simplified things like posing the canopy closed and the slats closed.  Not all 262's on the ground had their slats dropped did they?  Didn't appear to be so based on the photos I've been looking at.

 

There were a lot of things bothering me about trying to black-base this 262 AND incorporate hairspray chipping in certain areas AND establish the putty/anti-corrosive paint under the camo colors.  It just wasn't meshing in my head.  The change to silver clarifies things for me since it will approximate the base conditions of the actual aircraft.  I will apply grey paint (either by paint brush or airbrush) to mimic the example shown by WNr. 111711.  This will serve as the base for the RLM83/76 camo to come.

 

8q7g20b6c8o11.jpg

 

Messerschmitt-Me-262-Werk-Nr-111711-seen

 

The only thing I have not accounted for is the tonal variation that would be provided by either the black-base or black mottle approach.  I think it can be accomplished in a different way but first things first... getting the grey primer on.

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Not sure this is relevant to your build - the nose section forward of the aft edge of the gun bay is made of steel.

 

Model is looking great!

 

Cheers,

 

D.B.

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46 minutes ago, D.B. Andrus said:

Not sure this is relevant to your build - the nose section forward of the aft edge of the gun bay is made of steel.

 

Model is looking great!

 

Cheers,

 

D.B.

 

And hence the difference in coloration visible in the photos of WNr. 111711?  I did not know that but noticed the difference in color.  Yes, I think I will account for that but maybe with greys instead of metallics. 

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Ok... back to work on the 262!  Based on the information that the nose, from the cannon doors forward, was made of steel and not airframe aluminum, I painted the nose a darker metallic shade.  It was a mixture of two Aclad shades: Steel and Airframe Aluminum.
IMG-4360.jpg

 

I decided to tackle the tail mottling next.  Probably a highlight for me since it is one of the defining features of this aircraft.  The plan was to paint the darker color first and then use bits of Blue-Tack to represent the mottles.  The green was Tamiya Black Green.
IMG-4362.jpg

 

The Blue-Tack idea wasn't working out.  Although I've used it successfully on smaller 1/48 builds such as the Bf109K-4 rudder, it was hard to get the pieces of Blue-Tack to stuck onto the model.  I gave that up and decided to try and create custom masks using my Silhouette Portrait cutter.  The Experten Decals sheet has beautiful profiles of both sides by Tom Tullis.  Those were scanned and imported into AutoCAD.  I then traced the mottles and exported them to DXF format for cutting.  The masks were placed onto the tail using the profiles as a guide.
IMG-4363.jpg

 

The tail was then sprayed a lighter than normal shade of RLM76, based on the notes in the Experten instructions.
IMG-4364.jpg

 

The masks were carefully removed and the hard edged "tadpole" mottling is revealed.  There are some soft edges and overspray that need to be corrected but overall, the result is pretty good.
IMG-4365.jpg

I got some dreaded paint lift on the starboard side.
IMG-4366.jpg

 

Using a piece of Tamiya tape, I removed as much of the compromised paint as I could and then buffed out the edges of the removal with Micromesh.  The tail will be masked when I paint the camo so I wanted to be as pro-active as possible on the repair.
IMG-4368.jpg

 

The masks were re-used to repair the lifted paint areas.  Any soft edges or overspray was touched up with an airbrush or by hand.
IMG-4369.jpg

 

Here is the other side after touch-ups.
IMG-4370.jpg

 

Compare the mottles on the model with the profile... fairly spot-on.  I'm happy!
262_Gelbe_3_Tullis.jpg
IMG-4373.jpg

 

I need a kick in the pants to start the next stage, which is to establish the puttied/painted seams.  I still have not decided HOW I'm going to do this... brush paint?  Airbrush?
IMG-4371.jpg
IMG-4374.jpg

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Thanks Brian!

 

I've added some additional weathering on the tires.  Mostly to dirty up the sidewalls.  I also had to re-treat the tread grooves with a dark wash.  Every time I tried to lighten the tread surfaces with dry pastels, the grooves got that much lighter.  In the end, I dry-brushed a lighter dusty grey color and put wash in the grooves one final time.

IMG-4381.jpg
IMG-4376.jpg
IMG-4379.jpg

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Really nice work there John - I like the attention to detail. However, given that the Me-262 is a favorite of mine - I’m still not convinced about the leading edge slats being in the stowed position. They were spring loaded and only retracted when airborne due to the force applied to them by the airflow at speed. When correctly calibrated, they deployed at a certain airspeed for approach & landing and of course the take-off. They would never be in the stowed position unless lock-wired into the stowed position for transport; but, this was rarely done as it caused problems in recalibrating the springs. However, you are doing a beautiful job!! 

Cheers

Alan

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