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Thunnus

1/32 Trumpeter Me 262A-1a "Yellow 3"

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Ok... back to work on the 262!  Based on the information that the nose, from the cannon doors forward, was made of steel and not airframe aluminum, I painted the nose a darker metallic shade.  It was a mixture of two Aclad shades: Steel and Airframe Aluminum.
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I decided to tackle the tail mottling next.  Probably a highlight for me since it is one of the defining features of this aircraft.  The plan was to paint the darker color first and then use bits of Blue-Tack to represent the mottles.  The green was Tamiya Black Green.
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The Blue-Tack idea wasn't working out.  Although I've used it successfully on smaller 1/48 builds such as the Bf109K-4 rudder, it was hard to get the pieces of Blue-Tack to stuck onto the model.  I gave that up and decided to try and create custom masks using my Silhouette Portrait cutter.  The Experten Decals sheet has beautiful profiles of both sides by Tom Tullis.  Those were scanned and imported into AutoCAD.  I then traced the mottles and exported them to DXF format for cutting.  The masks were placed onto the tail using the profiles as a guide.
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The tail was then sprayed a lighter than normal shade of RLM76, based on the notes in the Experten instructions.
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The masks were carefully removed and the hard edged "tadpole" mottling is revealed.  There are some soft edges and overspray that need to be corrected but overall, the result is pretty good.
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I got some dreaded paint lift on the starboard side.
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Using a piece of Tamiya tape, I removed as much of the compromised paint as I could and then buffed out the edges of the removal with Micromesh.  The tail will be masked when I paint the camo so I wanted to be as pro-active as possible on the repair.
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The masks were re-used to repair the lifted paint areas.  Any soft edges or overspray was touched up with an airbrush or by hand.
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Here is the other side after touch-ups.
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Compare the mottles on the model with the profile... fairly spot-on.  I'm happy!
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I need a kick in the pants to start the next stage, which is to establish the puttied/painted seams.  I still have not decided HOW I'm going to do this... brush paint?  Airbrush?
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Thanks Brian!

 

I've added some additional weathering on the tires.  Mostly to dirty up the sidewalls.  I also had to re-treat the tread grooves with a dark wash.  Every time I tried to lighten the tread surfaces with dry pastels, the grooves got that much lighter.  In the end, I dry-brushed a lighter dusty grey color and put wash in the grooves one final time.

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Really nice work there John - I like the attention to detail. However, given that the Me-262 is a favorite of mine - I’m still not convinced about the leading edge slats being in the stowed position. They were spring loaded and only retracted when airborne due to the force applied to them by the airflow at speed. When correctly calibrated, they deployed at a certain airspeed for approach & landing and of course the take-off. They would never be in the stowed position unless lock-wired into the stowed position for transport; but, this was rarely done as it caused problems in recalibrating the springs. However, you are doing a beautiful job!! 

Cheers

Alan

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Thanks guys!  I'm satisfied with the way that the tail mottle turned out.  That Silhouette Portrait cutter is very useful tool!

 

7 hours ago, alaninaustria said:

Really nice work there John - I like the attention to detail. However, given that the Me-262 is a favorite of mine - I’m still not convinced about the leading edge slats being in the stowed position. They were spring loaded and only retracted when airborne due to the force applied to them by the airflow at speed. When correctly calibrated, they deployed at a certain airspeed for approach & landing and of course the take-off. They would never be in the stowed position unless lock-wired into the stowed position for transport; but, this was rarely done as it caused problems in recalibrating the springs. However, you are doing a beautiful job!! 

Cheers

Alan

 

Yes, Alan... I think this point has been established and acknowledged a few posts up.  It's a mistake that I'm going to live with because I am not going to dig out those slats at this point in the build.  The outer ones MIGHT be removable with minimum damage but not the inner ones and probably not the middle ones.  I did some extensive puttying/sanding/re-puttying/gouging/CA glueing/puttying on that starboard inboard slat that.... ummm, I'm just not going to go there.  So, I'll chalk it up as an opportunity lost.  Let's say Yellow 3 is being prepared for transport as III./KG(J) 54 was reassigned from bomber to fighter duties.  

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Your work is beautiful and although I initially thought the tail camo was a bit  too hard edged, when compared to the print of what the real deal looked like, I think you absolutely nailed it.  Those tires/wheels are spectacular as well.  As for the accuracy- or not- of the leading edge slats, as they say in Jersey, "Fugetaboutit!", as it appears you are.  I'll bet 98% of those who view your model now or in the future will never question the slats position, including me.

 

For the puttied seams, I would take a look at what Matt at "Doogs Models" has done below.  Rather than apply a putty seam, he masked off the areas that were not puttied, then sprayed a putty coat.

 

Doog's ME-262

 

Cheers,

Chuck

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11 hours ago, alaninaustria said:

Really nice work there John - I like the attention to detail. However, given that the Me-262 is a favorite of mine - I’m still not convinced about the leading edge slats being in the stowed position. They were spring loaded and only retracted when airborne due to the force applied to them by the airflow at speed. When correctly calibrated, they deployed at a certain airspeed for approach & landing and of course the take-off. They would never be in the stowed position unless lock-wired into the stowed position for transport; but, this was rarely done as it caused problems in recalibrating the springs. However, you are doing a beautiful job!! 

Cheers

Alan

The slats were not spring-loaded. They were free-floating, thus fell open while on the ground or reacted to airflow pressure in flight.

 

The link to the video again:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2Kc6NRwSic

 

HTH,

D

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