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Iain

New WnW - Sopwith Dolphin!

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Blackburn Blackburn anyone? 1200px-Blackburn_Blackburn_II_in_Flight.

Oh dear, I was sort of hoping that you wouldn't mention this one...:lol:

 

Nevermind, ugly is in the eye of the beholder :)

Edited by Tony C

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In all this mention of "appearance challenged" aircraft... no one has proposed the Westland Hill Pterodactyl V with that rear gunner's turret. One of the best of the British alternatives. Further still, we haven't even started on the French bombers of the 1930's. Now that's some real "ugly", but so far past that word that they came back from infinity to be fascinating, like the Italian entry of the S.M. 55 double hull seaplanes. Yet another set of my grail kits that have absolutely zero chance of being made in injection molded plastic.

 

I am just amazed that Sir Peter has given us so many interesting alternatives in his area of interest. Now all we need is for some other fanatic for aircraft models from another era to make a few billion of whatever currency lets them play. A big Thank You to all of those who create such fun opportunities.

 

Tnarg

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So I keep visiting the WNW website and ogling the new Dolphin kit.

 

It is growing on me!  I am starting to see that character.   :punk:

 

Oh hell, resistance is futile; I'm sure this will end up in my WNW collection.

The kits are boxed and presented so well they are almost worth buying for the sake of it, even if you think it might be a long time before you build the kit.  

 

The financial support also helps keep the WNW plane aloft, which is a worthy action. 

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And a Dolphin on my doorstep last night.    :m0152:

 

Guess I know what I'm doing this weekend!

 

Tim W.

 

PS - I also ordered one from SprueBros, so 2 is better than 1!

Edited by TimW

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The cockpit and forward fuselage assemblies have a high parts density and exhibit almost zero tolerance in fitting.  There is nothing wrong with the parts but excess glue or paint will cause a problem.  Think Fokker D.VII front end only more so.  I know there will be those of you who will rig the interior and I am in awe of you.  Paint everything that needs it before assembly because it's all difficult (that is, impossible) to reach after the sub-assemblies start going together.  Once the fuselage is together the rest is pretty straightforward.  I recommend reading through the instructions a few times after selecting your version; there are holes to be drilled, bits to trim and various part options.  Quality is top notch and the model captures "the look" of the Dolphin perfectly.  I have no idea how the pilot got in the seat if he was of medium or larger build with the upper wing section framework and a couple of Lewis guns in the way.

 

Sorry, no pics but I'm sure one of the "ace" builders will have some up soon.

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... I have no idea how the pilot got in the seat if he was of medium or larger build with the upper wing section framework and a couple of Lewis guns in the way....

 

 

 

 

 

Most Dolphins only carried one Lewis, if that. But the cockpit is definitely snug.

 

Lessee:

  • No bulky parachute.
  • Lost weight from front-line aerodrome chow and smoking cigarettes.
  • Average recruit in early 20's.
  • The twin Lewis guns, unlike the single, actually straddled the cockpit opening sides.

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Lessee:

  • No bulky parachute.
  • Lost weight from front-line aerodrome chow and smoking cigarettes.
  • Average recruit in early 20's.
  • The twin Lewis guns, unlike the single, actually straddled the cockpit opening sides.

 

 

Not to mention people were smaller 100 years ago! 

 

Heck, cars are much bigger now than they were just 25 years ago for a host of reasons, not the least of which is people keep getting bigger.

 

Very true about "lost weight from fighting a war."

 

I always chuckle at some of these WWII re-enactors, many of whom are rather portly...they instantly look "wrong" despite all the correct equipment and uniforms.  You just don't see infantrymen in film/photos from a combat situation looking fat and well fed.

 

They look gaunt, exhausted, hungry, and filthy.

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The cockpit and forward fuselage assemblies have a high parts density and exhibit almost zero tolerance in fitting.  There is nothing wrong with the parts but excess glue or paint will cause a problem.  Think Fokker D.VII front end only more so.  I know there will be those of you who will rig the interior and I am in awe of you.  Paint everything that needs it before assembly because it's all difficult (that is, impossible) to reach after the sub-assemblies start going together.  Once the fuselage is together the rest is pretty straightforward.  I recommend reading through the instructions a few times after selecting your version; there are holes to be drilled, bits to trim and various part options.  Quality is top notch and the model captures "the look" of the Dolphin perfectly.  I have no idea how the pilot got in the seat if he was of medium or larger build with the upper wing section framework and a couple of Lewis guns in the way.

 

Sorry, no pics but I'm sure one of the "ace" builders will have some up soon.

How much flash do you see on the parts?

 

I am working on the LVG from the duelist boxing these days and I was surprised at how much flash is all over the place (at least on the LVG).

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How much flash do you see on the parts?

 

I am working on the LVG from the duelist boxing these days and I was surprised at how much flash is all over the place (at least on the LVG).

Molding flash!? Hmmm... I never thought to look after the first few kits. To me having flash is tantamount to finding the wrong kit in the box; never expected.

 

Rick

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Not to mention people were smaller 100 years ago! 

 

Heck, cars are much bigger now than they were just 25 years ago for a host of reasons, not the least of which is people keep getting bigger.

 

Very true about "lost weight from fighting a war."

 

I always chuckle at some of these WWII re-enactors, many of whom are rather portly...they instantly look "wrong" despite all the correct equipment and uniforms.  You just don't see infantrymen in film/photos from a combat situation looking fat and well fed.

 

They look gaunt, exhausted, hungry, and filthy.

The total bane of the life of the reenactor.  I do ACW and AWI; but am too old and too big.   Weight loss is a work in progress, but I'm still way past the age of most of those who served, who were in their teens/early 20s.

 

Funny, this is a problem in a lot of movies, too.  Saving Private Ryan?  Most of those guys were way too old for their roles.  Memphis Belle kinda got it right.  Kids.

 

One of my PhD committee members (Korean War vet) has remarked on that more than once re: movies, reenactments, etc.

 

Now, back to my Dolphin...

 

Tim W.

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Never bought a WNW kit, but I have to say that the Dolphin is growing on me. I did like the idea in an earlier post of combining a Revell1/28 Camel and SPAD as the basis for a scratch build as well.........Hmm.

 

Steve

Edited by Bradleygolding

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Molding flash!? Hmmm... I never thought to look after the first few kits. To me having flash is tantamount to finding the wrong kit in the box; never expected.

 

Rick

 

The small parts in the LVG are loaded with small amounts of flash that is really annoying to get rid of without damaging the part itself.  Some of the smaller parts have so much flash around the intended detail that the part is sort of growing into a newly shaped part and you have to figure out what should stay and what should go.

There is also a thin mold join line running around the perimeter of tons of parts, like the wings for example, that has to come off with a scraping razor blade motion. 

Tons of cleanup work with that LVG.

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