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SCRATCH BUILDER

3D Printing

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3 hours ago, BiggTim said:

So far, I'm pretty impressed with the resolution this printer will pull off

 

Your right Tim, it's no Form Labs 2 but for the price it will give you darn good starting point, your shrinkage is more in volume then dimension, there is some but you can compensate for that by doing a little math and scaling it up .0001 mm (<--not a real number) , when you move on to your next bottle of resin try the ABS like resin, it's a lot more durable. Your exposed time is twice that of Anycubic resin but worth the time.

 

 

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3 hours ago, GrahamF said:

Leave it a few weeks and then look at it again, I've found these prints always warp in time.

 

Have had my printer for about 3 month now, I haven't had any warping issue's

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15 hours ago, BiggTim said:

20190131-131317.jpg

It's about 1mm thick now:

20190131-132222.jpg

 

Again, not fully cured yet, so the nubbins have not been fully removed yet. My UV curing lamp LEDs will be her tomorrow.

So far, I'm pretty impressed with the resolution this printer will pull off, and the gray is a lot less stinky than the green it came with.

 

Tim

 

 

Nice work Tim.. if you turn that cowl the other way around the supports will be on the inside and it'll leave your exterior surface blemish free... the inside can be as ugly as you want, eh?

 

As far as shrinkage with the Anycubic Photon printer.. I have not noticed that at all. in fact the parts are coming out exactly the right size, and months later there has been no shrinkage that I can notice... real thin parts can indeed warp though.. so you have to be careful of that... but once glued in position they are usually fine.

Edited by Bil

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14 hours ago, SCRATCH BUILDER said:

 

Your right Tim, it's no Form Labs 2 but for the price it will give you darn good starting point, your shrinkage is more in volume then dimension, there is some but you can compensate for that by doing a little math and scaling it up .0001 mm (<--not a real number) , when you move on to your next bottle of resin try the ABS like resin, it's a lot more durable. Your exposed time is twice that of Anycubic resin but worth the time.

 

 

I will definitely try their resin next time!

2 hours ago, Bil said:

 

Nice work Tim.. if you turn that cowl the other way around the supports will be on the inside and it'll leave your exterior surface blemish free... the inside can be as ugly as you want, eh?

I toyed with that idea, and may yet print one that way just to see which I like better. The only potential problem I could see with having the supports attached to the inside of it would be accessing them to snip them off. The supports would be rather densely packed in there, and I doubt I could get a nipper or knife in to do it. The part is thin enough, that simply breaking them off may actually break the part, so that doesn't seem a good option, either. Guess I'll find out!

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Tip. Tip things up at crazy angles. This process HATES building stuff parallel to the bed. So, imagine a cube. Turn it so it is up on one pointy corner! Do NOT build it with one face flat.  Better build guaranteed. 

 

Second tip. Avoid  'cupping', where you have a closed void like a suction cup getting pulled up of the release layer. The suction will likely pull the part off its supports, as well as damage the release layer. 

 

Third tip. Don't get too obsessed with using super fine layers. You will be hard pressed to spot the difference between a part at 0.05 mm as opposed to 0.025, the build will be stronger, and you won't be burning up laser or LED or release layer time so quickly. 

 

Have fun! And learn CAD!! 

Edited by wunwinglow

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One question Tim,

Was that done with auto supports, you can also change the density down to 30 from 35, in some case's the software over compensates supports, if auto supports are to close together i remove some of them, most the time a 5mm spacing is good. i have printed a small flat piece for support testing,  maybe a 1/2" x 1/2" .01mil piece, put 3 at a time on the plate with different support density's and see which you are more comfortable with. You can also make your top point smaller .30, .40 this lessen the chance of breaking the part  but you would need more supports, I am finding i always edit my support to my liking depending on where they touch the part.

 

You will get it tuned in, hell took me a month, the STL's i sent you were a good tool for me (where and how do put supports on something this small and not have to sand off some detail)

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As Tim (wunwinglow) said the key of perfect 3d print is a LOT of experience (obviously...), know each part designed and identify the ideal angle of print and above all, learn how to manually place the damn supports, this makes the difference.

Edited by onosendai

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I found it's better to have more supports as you will find it will warp during printing, the cowling there is the correct way round as if it's the other way it puts too much in shadow, think of it as shining a torch on it, always have everything at 45 degrees as well so the laser light can access it more easily.

Graham 

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Some other thoughts. You will nearly always need to edit the support locations, I use FormLabs and it does a good job with its suggested supports, but I have never yet been able to run it without moving some to better locations. You can also adjust the contact point size, so have larger, sturdy point where the break scar is going to be hidden, and smaller ones where they are still necessary, but will leave less of a mess to clean up. The software always plays safe, but with a bit of experience and understanding the process, and your own requirements for the part, you can always do better than the software! 

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On 2/1/2019 at 12:29 AM, BiggTim said:

20190131-132222.jpg

 

 

 

You could try to print it that way, maybe only with supports around the lower edge.  Perhaps it will fail, but to a certain degree, overhanging objects can be printed without support, so who knows how it tourns out

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Here are printed landing gears from a weird project that distracts me from my already ongoing builds. The "leg" is printed as one single part with the Anycubic Photon. The tires consist of two halves, created with a conventional FDM printer, which could be easily sanded when put on a Dremel.

 

tZmncY9.jpg

 

Cheers

Alex

Edited by AlexM

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