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How about: a 1/32 Tamiya P-38 Lightning?

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5 hours ago, cbk57 said:

I was of the opinion Tamiya would never release a model of a p-38 used in Tamiya shoot down.  I said so on the thread regarding new 1/32 Tamiya.  It is almost a thumb in the nose to the people expressing opinions such as mine and I am quite happy to eat my statement.  

 

I really don't recall who was commenting back then, but my answer was directed specifically to Dennis, who expressed the notion that Tamiya was releasing the kit due to its significant history in the region, which is completely contradictory to what others have assumed in the past would not happen. I just perused the Tamiya catalog, and they sell Wildcats, Corsairs and Mustangs, all of which exacted a heavy toll on Japanese forces, as well as any number of 1:35 allied tanks that were directly involved in the island campaigns against the Japanese, so I just really don't see any pattern of avoidance there at all.

 

If you were taken aback by my comment, rest assured there was no malice implied, as that most certainly was not my intent.

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11 hours ago, Lothar said:

Even though I have the Trumpy kit I'd chew my mother in law's ear off

for a 32nd Tamiya P-38 and if its only for looking at the contents and

being happy to have it.

 

Lothar

Interesting choice of people to chew things off of, Lothar!

 

I think anyone who's been around here for the past few years knows that there is probably nothing I wouldn't chew off, of just about anyone, to see a Tamiya P-38 in 1/32, and my mother-in-law is not on the list. If it came to that, they can keep the darn kit.

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, cbk57 said:

I was of the opinion Tamiya would never release a model of a p-38 used in Tamiya shoot down.  I said so on the thread regarding new 1/32 Tamiya.  It is almost a thumb in the nose to the people expressing opinions such as mine and I am quite happy to eat my statement.  

 

The Japanese "approach" to the war is different from the Western "approach". In almost every way, it is similar to the Romanian attitude. When I grew up in Romania, no one spoke about the Romanian involvement on the Eastern Front. Romania was the second largest Axis combatant on the Eastern Front, with large contingents and equipment and hundreds of thousands of casualties, prisoners and injured. Almost every family in Romania was affected. On 23 August 1944, Romania switched sides, left the Axis and joined the Allies. When the war ended, with the Russians now based in Romania, it became a "bad idea" to mention the war against the Russians. When we studied history in school, all we ever learned was about what followed after 23 August. Romania was behind the iron curtain. Romanians could only access heavily-censored history. Stuck behind the Iron Curtain, Romanians were fed an altered version of history. Western historians had limited access to info also. So, as a result, the huge efforts and sacrifices made by the Romanian army were completely ignored and eventually forgotten. That is why all my decals are about Romanian aircraft, so they would not be forgotten. However, (and this is where I was going with this) people in Romania still spoke about the war effort. In family chats, inside the house, I could hear hints, whispers, indications that my grandfather fought in Russia. "He was injured in the war". "Where?" "Ah... somewhere out East. Shhhh, don't tell anyone." I never met my grandfather, he died the year before I was born. A friend of my grandfather's was still around, friend of the family. After he died I found a photo of him in an infantry Captain uniform. "When was this?" "Ah...the war... Stalingrad, I think, with your grandfather". "What was he doing there? Was he lost?" "Ah... No... He fought there." "Why?" "You know, the war..." The grandfather of one of my friends in school was missing a leg and walked in crutches. The official story was that he lost it in a vague "accident". My mother let it slip one day that he was actually "injured in the war", that he actually had some "big medals" and even "spent some time in a Russian camp". And so on...in drips and drops, the truth comes out. The point is that these people had to shut up if they wanted to keep their jobs, if they wanted to keep living some kind of normal life without bother from "the power that be" who may not appreciate any mentions of "uncomfortable" subjects. I have been to Japan a few times, I have friends there. Their elders do the same as old Romanians. First, they do not speak about the war, or if they do, they speak in terms that are framed in such a way as to avoid causing "trouble". Eventually you may get "drips and drops" of info, such as "my great-uncle was a radio operator on a ship" or "my grandmother's first boyfriend disappeared". So, if you ask a Japanese person about a thing linked to the war (such as a Lightning) you will get a deflected yet polite reply. That does not mean that they will never approach the subject. They will, but in their own way, in their own time. If you try to find "unbreakable rules" in vague replies, more fool you. ;-)

Radu

Edited by Radub

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Have to agree with Misha71, same reflections were on my side when figuring out my polish background, but this has nothing to do with possible releases of kits neither "friend or foe", but i see your statement very clear.

 

Now what about the 32scale Lightnig you're talking about........:wicked:

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The P-38 Lightning does nothing for me; I'm a jet guy, but I'd be very happy for those of you who have it on their "wish" list if Tamiya was to come out with this kit!

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On 7/26/2019 at 4:02 PM, LSP_K2 said:

 

I really don't recall who was commenting back then, but my answer was directed specifically to Dennis, who expressed the notion that Tamiya was releasing the kit due to its significant history in the region, which is completely contradictory to what others have assumed in the past would not happen. I just perused the Tamiya catalog, and they sell Wildcats, Corsairs and Mustangs, all of which exacted a heavy toll on Japanese forces, as well as any number of 1:35 allied tanks that were directly involved in the island campaigns against the Japanese, so I just really don't see any pattern of avoidance there at all.

 

If you were taken aback by my comment, rest assured there was no malice implied, as that most certainly was not my intent.

I took no offense, only expressing what I said vs the fact that Tamiya took action to the contrary which makes me very happy indeed.  

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Posted (edited)

On a slight tangent to what Radu mentioned above - please read Alexandr Solzhenitsyn - “The Gulag Archipelago” to gain a better understanding of what living life under Marxist rule was like during Soviet times... eye opening. And for those who do not know about this book - it is a publication that helped bring the Soviet Union to an end...

When we spoke to our elders who fought the Russians and were later imprisoned by them and released - they were very clear about the intentions and the reasons the Wehrmacht was fighting in Russia. It is a very multifaceted point in history. The biggest open ended question was asking why the Western powers decided to support Stalin and everything he represented... my grandfather always told us about the hundreds of thousands of young Russians who when given the opportunity took up arms against Stalin - they are forgotten to the World forever - yet mentioned and honored by Solzhenitsyn. For a very clear first account of how history can be distorted and life under Marxist rule could be - read the above mentioned book. The Austrians on the other hand are very good at portraying themselves as victims and erasing any trace of that conflict - to the point that one is left wondering if it even really did happen... I recently spoke with a Japanese roommate I am temporarily living together with - she visited Hiroshima three times in her young life - when asked what it meant for her and what significance it holds in the Japanese collective mentality her answer left me wondering if they (the Japanese) have a clear understanding of World history of the 20th century... 

Cheers

Alan

Edited by alaninaustria

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Posted (edited)

My point was about how the Japanese approach any conversation about WW2. They consider it a very delicate subject and they will try as much as possible to avoid a "confrontation" about it. As a separate story, when I went to Japan the first time, the travel agent arranged a guide who showed us around Tokyo and took us to the Edo Museum (Edo being the medieval name of Tokyo). There, in a display cabinet, was the "Instrument of Surrender" signed on the deck of USS Missouri and I was telling the guide that the document was a "big thing" that featured in every documentary about the Pacific War. We started talking about what we learned in school about the Pacific War, Hiroshima/Nagasaki, etc. She was fascinated and said "You learned about the war and Hiroshima? We never studied this in school". War is a delicate subject for the Japanese.  So, when you speak to older Japanese people, they will try to be vague and polite about the war.

Radu 

Edited by Radub

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Posted (edited)

i have a very good friend here in Finland who is japanese. For the japanese people today, there is a big element of "the elder got misled by a militaristic society and did terrible things as a result" in their view of the war. It leads to an ambiguous situation for them as in one hand thy respect their elders yet they feel totally unrelated to what ww2 japan did.

 

In that sense, they are not really told about the details of ww2, they are more told about its result and why they got uterly destroyed so that they don't go that path again

 

So they would not think in terms of "our planes versus their planes" as the equipment is merely a detail in their eyes

Edited by Vincent/MDC

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14 minutes ago, Vincent/MDC said:

So they would not think in terms of "our planes versus their planes" as the equipment is merely a detail in their eyes

 

Well... I can tell you that if you go to the owner of a Japanese model company and say "make a Val or a Kate because they were involved in Pearl Harbour", you will only get a deflected-yet-polite answer because that is the wrong approach to the subject. It is very likely that your Japanese interlocutor has a very detailed and rich knowledge of the war, but he/she will never tell you that. Most likely they will give you a non-commital answer. Japanese culture relies a lot on "implied meanings" and a steadfast dedication to avoiding conflict or embarassment. So, that was my initial point: do not try to make "unbreakable rules" from the replies given by some Japanese people. However, if you got a clear "no", then that is pretty much a solid answer :-) 
Radu 

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