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F-15E --- 1/32 --- Tamiya

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I don't know if you guys are familiar with modern, high performance jet skins, plates and panels, but it's very tough, not flexible at all, a few millimetres thick, very hard aluminium alloy and because of that pretty sensitive for cracks.  It's nothing like world war 2 era planes material. So "oil canning" or "stressed skin effect" is pretty unlikely, although it looks like it on that picture.

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Well, when it comes to the real plane, I could only see pictures and videos :), but in all cases it's obvious that the surfaces are not mirror flat like in a oob model. I like it a lot how it looks like after that stressed effect. It's very subtle indeed and the difference is barely noticeable only at very shallow angle, otherwise it looks like before, perfectly flat. I think I found my Nirvana with this "weathering" effect. :)

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I don't know if you guys are familiar with modern, high performance jet skins, plates and panels, but it's very tough, not flexible at all, a few millimetres thick, very hard aluminium alloy and because of that pretty sensitive for cracks.  It's nothing like world war 2 era planes material. So "oil canning" or "stressed skin effect" is pretty unlikely, although it looks like it on that picture.

 

I think that the images that show significant "oil-canning" on modern aircraft are often of jets making hard manoeuvres and under extreme stress. The g-force appears to temporarily ripple the aircraft skin which then settles back to nearly flat when in normal flight. Jari's images seem to show that there are certain areas that appear distorted even in normal flight though.

 

Cheers.

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Well, maybe in the extreme low temperatures of high altitude or under high G- loads it can happen in certain area's  but I don't see it on planes on the ground. The metal is made to be strong and keep its shape and will crack easily when it's deformed.

Anyway, it doesn't mean I don't like your build, I love it! It will certainly look great when it's finished. :goodjob:

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Hi Milan

For a background, a neutral color.shade/toner would be a mid tone Gray of mid tone blue. White is a hard background because it greatly effects the overall exposure and the camera unless you adjust your exposure. I prefer a dark blue background which helps pop the model and doesn't have much effect on the overall exposure.

Keep 'em coming

Peter

I wouldn't waste my time trying to explain that. It has been done several times already and he just doesn't seems to listen.

Or his receiver is tuned at another freq.

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I think that the images that show significant "oil-canning" on modern aircraft are often of jets making hard manoeuvres and under extreme stress. The g-force appears to temporarily ripple the aircraft skin which then settles back to nearly flat when in normal flight. Jari's images seem to show that there are certain areas that appear distorted even in normal flight though.

 

Cheers.

Actually viperfixer is quite right. There are changes on the surface but they are not significant as they look on the pictures. The effect is exaggerated a bit, that's why it often causes confusion.

If the skin was that bent, the laminar flow would've been disrupted and that would've caused a line of subsequent troubles for the actual flying part of the job.

That is why the best way to approach this in scale modeling is with pre- and pos-shading, panel lines and oils.

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I have to say, I think the rippling effect looks good - and I agree it'll be better under paint. To me, it's all about creating an impression, and I like this one. Not everyone will, that's cool, but I'm betting it'll add to the model.

 

Just my $0.02.

 

Jim

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Here are some examples of a/c out in the real world, some are shiny and clean:

 

080528-F-2828D-308.JPG

others have been out in the sun and sand for awhile:

 

160713-F-NJ596-007.JPG

 

note the intake ramp on this one:

 

140226-F-AM664-001.JPG

 

Jari

What in the world are the streaks that appear to originate from the leading edge on the dirty bird in the middle?

 

Jeff

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To get in on the debate about the "ripple effect" ive seen alot of birds in and out of service, and ive seen deformed panels. Not over the entirety of the a/c but in certain areas. I'm in no way a scientist or an engineer but I would assume at the speeds these planes are reaching just the friction from the passing air would cause certain panels to heat and thus become deformed.... but what do i know. Either way i look at what we all do as art more than anything and there are no rules etched in stone for art. Going to look great no matter what!

 

Jeff

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