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Fred Jack

Pre WW1 Aeroplanes in 1/32

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Remember, guys and gals, there are Wright planes out and you can't get any earlier than that and the Eindekker E.1 and Morane Sauner, and Albatros B.2, that's out are of the same flimsy construction as many prewar. I remember when the idea of even WW1 AC in large scale would be considered problematic and not marketable. Building frames is not the problem, the stuff that went inside the frames, and WnWs proved that that could be done. I'm not just interested in models but aircraft as well, and there are two very large voids in models, pre and post WW1. Remember, Pyro did produce pre WW1 aircraft and they did sell, but could you imagine the details of 1/32 and the fact you can place many in the space of one jet. Don't forget how complex models are now days. Remember manufactures do read these posts. We should give them the final word of how hard it would be instead of giving them excuses why they shouldn't or can't.

Edited by Fred Jack

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Aviattic now makes clear doped linen decal. I saw a Bleriot and it only looked transparent underneath the flying surfaces.

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I also think that 3d printing is the way to go for such kits: designed by enthusiasts, produced on demand, built in a way similar to the full-scale ones, offering the possibility to get partial or full kits and so on.

 

The only problem stays the price but for a niche within a niche, hoping to get them at Revell price is a wild dream... Hph or Fisher kits are not cheap either!

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Des Delatorre has an elegant solution to no kits of pre ww1 aircraft.

Scratch buildinghttp://www.ww1aircraftmodels.com/page46.html

Super site.

Jon

Edit: I didn't see Dean's post about Des.

But while I'm here http://www.ww1aircraftmodels.com/page44.html

Some of us would agree, but that's not the majority....I personally love to scratch build models, but the reality is that few of us have the time or material for the research needed, and while many modelers have the skill, it is or can be rather daunting to create something from nothing. I know that I have spent many months and countless dollars just getting together enough solid information to even begin a total scratch build project so I understand why most don't go down that road.

 

Joe

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2 problems here for me.

1) Money. $340. 'nuff said

2) I simply do not like the looks of that plane. It not only does not attract me, but it repels me. It s just a personal thing, But If I don't like the way it looks I want nothing to do with it. I kinda like biplanes.

 

It is too bad laser cutters are so expensive. I am still looking to try to find a reasonably priced laser cutter that can cut thin wood. I have seen them before but they cost money. I'll keep looking, though. These early planes just cry out for the stick and tissue approach to modeling. In the old days everything was printed onto thin balsa wood. then the modeler had to cut them out while trying to avoid splitting the fragile balsa wood (Lots of luck with that). During WW2 one company substituted die cut cardboard for the wood. That worked OK. I think it was the Joe Ott Company. Balsa was reserved for military use.

Really that technique can be done today. Print the plans and then glue them to the sheet material (use rubber cement so the paper can easily be removed later). You can then make the model out of thin plywood or sheet wood (you are not making a flying model so weight is not a factor). Or make it by cutting thin card stock. Or sheet copper or brass. 

OR make a plastic model by cutting the parts out of sheet polystyrene plastic. 

This can be done today. Its all there for us to use.

BUT, the modeler will be making his own parts and that will deter many modelers who are accustomed to all the parts already done and just sitting in a box to be taken out and glued together. Those modelers will be frustrated because it is unlikely anyone will produce an IM kit like they are used to building.

So we are back where we started.

 

Oh well. :shrug:

Stephen

 

P.S. Parchment looks like plain canvas for models.

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AJP made a series of photo etched and metal kits for the Antionette, Deperdussin, Henri Farman, etc. in 1/48 scale. They are not the easiest to build, but appear interesting as a possibility for 1/32 versions of those planes. The Antionette had separate ribs, where the others were more two dimensional, so I would use that as the example (like stick and tissue planes).

 

RB productions made the PE wing and tail set for the Eindecker in 1/32, but I haven't seen anyone building it. They are a bit more involved than the WNW alternative, but seem like the possible way for us to gain access to these amazing early airframes. Maybe a printed set of parts for the engine, wheels, and thicker parts plus laser cut or photo etched wings, etc. could work, but it seems a bit more involved than vac form kits, and we don't see a lot of those built either.

 

I guess we have to face the fact that it will take real work. It won't fall out of the box like some other alternatives.

 

Tnarg

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