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How to finish an LSP..

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I am 18 months into a scratchbuilt F7F Tigercat, it is about 80% done but I am finding my mind wandering – I think want to build something else too…

 

..trouble is I can't because I have so much invested in the F7F that I am terrified if I even start to think about another build I will have wasted all that time and effort and I will never get it finished..

 

I want to know how some of you manage to quite contentedly build more than one thing at a time?  Do you not worry that time, money & effort in a subject you go cool on is not wasted, how will you ever go back? When will you go back & is it important that you go back sooner rather than later?

 

I have a choice I cannot reconcile – 1) stick with it, but feel like I am pushing through to get it done or 2) switch track / do both / give in to builders freedoms and risk the waste and guilt that go with it

 

So, team, how is it done? How do you actually finish a model and would making more than one at a time make you more or less likely to?

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Guilt?

 

It's a pile of plastic & a hobby for fun - if you are feeling guilt, perhaps you are taking it too seriously?

 

Sounds like another build is exactly what you need. A break. A nice, quick OOB - the Tigercat is going nowhere & it cares not a damn whether it's completed or not.

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I guess it's just what's in your nature. Some are quite proud of sticking to one thing at a time, working it through to the end. Others do what they want. It's a hobby and meant to be a diversion, so if you are wondering about what to do then it sounds like you need some time off from the hobby. I have three choices to make each day. It's either work on my 'main' project, work on something else, or don't even bother going downstairs. Ever other day I end up making a different decision.

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I've fallen victim to this problem in the last year.

 

  I have an WnW Albi 90% done and sitting waiting on rigging I don't want to do,  a Tamiya Mossie in it's first coat of paint just sitting, a Tamiya Spitty assembled, waiting on paint and sitting, a Tamiya Tiger 1 tank painted and sitting and now a Tamiya Ferrari Spider half assembled and my current project.  

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I only build 2 at a time when I'm almost done with my primary build and am waiting for paints to dry or decals to set.

 

Your case is a little different though.

 

I'd say take a break, build a few shake 'n bakes to break the monotony and get back to the big cat when you're ready.

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I know how you feel Peter. My last 2 models took 14 months each to complete and there were many days that I just stared at the parts on my workbench and did nothing.  I'm not one to do 2 projects at once, because I'm afraid of losing parts and focus on what needs to be done next, so starting another model is not even an option.  To get back on the build bandwagon, I find these things help:

 

1)  Do more research on your model.  Unless I feel passionate about the modeling subject, I don't have much drive to finish it, so I try end get enthused again by looking a new photos and reading up on details of the aircraft or its history.

 

2)  Skip some details that are maybe a waste of time.  For instance, I have started to not care too much about super detailing landing gear wells, which take a lot of time but are rarely seen again later.  By reducing the overall workload, you can see the end of the tunnel a little clearer.

 

3)  Try something new in your build.  Maybe a painting or build technique you've never tried before can get you motivated again.  I always try something new in my builds to keep me interested in modeling overall.  Sometimes I win and sometimes I crash and burn, but the experimentation can be really interesting and if you find success, very satisfying.

 

And, the most important one

 

4)  "Just do it!"  Sometimes I have to force myself to get going again and before too long, I'm really into it.

 

 

Hope this helps,

Chuck

 

 

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Guilt?

 

It's a pile of plastic & a hobby for fun - if you are feeling guilt, perhaps you are taking it too seriously?

 

Sounds like another build is exactly what you need. A break. A nice, quick OOB - the Tigercat is going nowhere & it cares not a damn whether it's completed or not.

 

EXACTLY!  When a build starts to bog down, I'll gab an older kit and do some creative painting to feel relaxed after playing for a few days or weeks

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I agree with the comments about just taking the risk and putting it aside for a while. This is supposed to be fun, so if that fades, then what's the point in pushing it? Follow where your enjoyment where it leads. "Pushing through" is for work. Frankly, so what if it never gets done? The sun will still come up tomorrow.

Edited by BiggTim

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I think I've just come to the conclusion that I can only cope with multiple projects - working on one thing at a time is just not for me, much as I'd like that to be the case, and as much as I've tried...

 

And, in my head, they will all get finished - one day!

 

Iain

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I can fall into the same condition and I am absoultely no expert on getting back on course.  I have more than one thing going on believe me so wandering off on something new due to waning interest is a problem.  Anyways these are my approach.

  • I sit at the bench and say JUST DO IT! (pretty effective)
  • I seem to be able to enforce the one kit on the bench at a time rule (kits do not just get moved to the side)
  • I try to leave a project at an easy to pick up step.
  • Apply much pep self talk, go look on line for a nice build of the same (sometimes backfires), look at photos of the real a/c and work up the excitement (photos work best).
  • Avoid reading a new build of the latest cool kit it any detail (cuts off the drive to start something new)

Rick

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I think I've just come to the conclusion that I can only cope with multiple projects - working on one thing at a time is just not for me, much as I'd like that to be the case, and as much as I've tried...

 

And, in my head, they will all get finished - one day!

 

Iain

In my head every kit in my stash has been built at least three times. I wish I could build that quick in real life, except that I'd have run out of kits long ago ...

 

I can't add much to what everyone else has said; I have a break and do something quick and easy. What I do find is that when I put a build aside, then come back to it later, what was an insurmountable problem blocking progress is now easily overcome.

 

[Edit for typos: I really shouldn't post from my phone, it can't spell.]

Edited by MikeC

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Oh boy does this ring a bell.

 

Peter, I feel your pain but there is alot of sage advice in the words of our friends above.

It is, afterall, a hobby. A pastime, a diversion, call it what you may. It should be an opportunty to escape the every day pressure of real life and provide some pleasant down time.

However, a modeller of your talent and ambition makes a rod for his or her own back. Once you've begun down the path of super-detailling it is difficult to retreat. Anything that does n't look exactly perfect becomes unsatisfactory yet, that quest for ultimate realism can cause one to lose enthusiasm for modelling lest it become more like work.

Additionally you may feel a pressure to perform for an adoring audience. We all enjoy your work and repeatedly clamour for updates not recognising that we might be adding to your plight.

 

You must choose what makes you happy. If you have lost all interest in your current project then so be it. Move on. Yes, you've invested a length of time and effort in it but at the same time you have gained enormous experience along the way. That may be applied to the next model and the next after that.

Truth be told, if you do begin another project the Tigercat is n't going to melt or go off. It'll still be there for you to tinker with when the yen takes you. (I should know, I have a different 'Cat that's pretty old but I still get back to it now and then.)

 

You'll work it out.

 

Cheers.

Edited by geedubelyer

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I chat with a friend while building, or listen to radio, or music.

Building would be no problem without that, however, since to me it is just like walking: One step follow another, and the mind focus on other things.

Edited by Hardcore

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