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chuck540z3

Tamiya F-15C Kicked Up A Notch- Dec 1/17: DONE!

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FinalNozzles8.jpg

 

 

 

Cheers,

Chuck

 

 

that is quite simply the best WIP image I have ever seen on any forum, anywhere..  ever...

 

you can get lost in the detail & realism - literally takes the breath away

 

truly a master at work and a priviledge to watch it unfold...

 

Peter

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Your nozzles look way above awesome Chuck! one of your best performances so far IMHO!

 

I really respect the fact that you are always improving! every model is better than the last one! and that, in my book, is something to admire!

 

 

A little known fact about the Tamiya pastels is that they are not oil based like most pastels, but water based, which means they can be dissolved in water to form a wash.  Here I have scraped off some of the Burnt Blue pastels into a cup and added a drop or two of water.

 

I don't know about tamiya pastels, but regular pastels work the same way,  you just have to add a drop of soap to break water tension, and it helps to stick better.

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Thanks Guys!  You are all too kind.

 

Here's one more shot trying to photograph the interior of the flame holder.  Not great, but you can sort of get the idea of what it looks like in real life.

 

 

Engineinterior1.jpg

 

 

 

that is quite simply the best WIP image I have ever seen on any forum, anywhere..  ever...

 

you can get lost in the detail & realism - literally takes the breath away

 

truly a master at work and a privilege to watch it unfold...

 

Peter

 

 

Aw man Peter, now I can't get my head through the door!  :o   Thanks for the very nice compliment, especially when I consider the source.

 

 

Your nozzles look way above awesome Chuck! one of your best performances so far IMHO!

 

I really respect the fact that you are always improving! every model is better than the last one! and that, in my book, is something to admire!

 

 

 

Thank you sir- and you have hit on my primary goal with each new build:  Make it better than the last model.  Based upon what I see so far, this one has a good chance.

 

March 6/17

 

Now a real quick update.

 

The horizontal stabilizers- or stabilators as they are most often called- have a very fine pin to attach them to the fuselage.  The pin is flimsy, it bends and it doesn't stay in position, so you are likely forced to glue it unless you make some modifications.  I see that "F's are my favs" has used thick round sprue to bolster his F-15E, while I used drill bits again to make the stabilators both strong and movable, without any flex to allow them to sag.

 

First the problem.  Left as is, the join is flimsy and unstable.

 

 

Stabilator1.jpg

 

 

Using drill bits as a new pivot point, I cut off the kit spindle and drilled a hole in its place.  Drill bits were then cut to length using a Dremel tool and a cut-off wheel.  As large as this pivot spindle is, the real deal is even larger according to Jake's book on page 127, so if it shows a bit, it should still look reasonably accurate.  When inserted into the stabilator, the drill bit has no choice but to center itself within the stabilator as it thins on the inside, making it perfectly straight.

 

 

Stabilator2.jpg

 

 

Using a drill bit the same size, widen the hole within the fuselage, trying to keep everything perfectly straight.

 

 

Stabilator3.jpg

 

 

Voila, the stabilator is now strong, straight and can pivot at will- and you don't need to glue anything now or later.  If the pin is a bit loose (one of mine was), coat the drill bit with a thin coat of CA glue to widen it very slightly.  Using both glue and specific sanding, you can achieve a perfectly snug fit.

 

 

Stabilator4.jpg

 

 

Although it doesn't show very well on this pic, the stabilators were sanded down at the trailing edge to make them very thin, just like the real deal.

 

 

Stabilator5.jpg

 

 

I've read that the seams on the stabilators are not accurate and they should be sanded off.  This is not necessarily true.  According to Jake's book, they are the more modern version of stabilator found on all F-15E's and as the fleet of F-15A-D's age, these same stabilators are finding their way onto older jets.  Since the stabilators are quite featureless as it is, I'm keeping them.

 

 

Stabilator6.jpg

 

 

That's about it for now Gents.  My next task is many hours of re-scribing the wings and adding a zillion rivets to a LOT of new panels.

 

 

Cheers,

Chuck

Edited by chuck540z3

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Drill bits? Kinda pricey for that role, no?

 

Not at all.  Ever see one of those drill bit sets with a hundred or more bits for $20 or so?  They're $20 because they are crap and will wear out after only one or two uses.  I got one of these sets a few years ago for Xmas from my well-meaning wife, only my set has at least 250 bits in it of all sizes that you can think of, so I have almost an endless supply.  If I want to drill real holes in wood or metal, I use the good bits that are likely $4-5 each.  Those I do not cut up!

 

Cheers,

Chuck

Edited by chuck540z3

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Very nice! Something on the stabilators - are you sure that they will stay perfectly straight to each other, and parallel according to the wings? Maybe a better idea is first to glue/adjust the wings and then the correct angle of the stabilators... :) That`s what i came across while doing mines - first the stabilators were added and they looked perfect. But after adding the wings - i had to re-adjust one of the stabilators slightly, which somehow went not exactly well, and so i ended up by gluing it permanently in the correct neutral pose. Of course, even a slightly bigger imperfection is not visible when the stabilators are moved at certain angle, but when are straight in neutral angle...  :hmmm:

 

And, very good looking nozzle flaps as well!

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Great way to show most of the possibilities available in resin and plastic.  I appreciate the positive way you approached the subject as Mike, Bruce ( who mastered CE a decade ago), and myself all put a tremendous amount of time into the respective products.  The F-15 naked nozzles are tremendously detailed, and whether you use resin or plastic, there are serious compromises that have to be made if one does not want to use PE.   I for one am just glad that Eduard and Flightpath offer what they do so there is a mall metal option. 

 

Hereis the Hybrid PE method that Chuck is opting not to do.  Each Nozzle is 667 parts  and takes 50-55 hours to assemble.  close to 8 million!!!!!! LOL

 

Working on IAF 957 build at present and debating whether to not to use the Resin exhausts with TF's.  She has flown both ways and not sure which way to go.  The nozzles look so cool no matter which way you build them I hate to cover them up with tf's.  Here are some 90% pics of the new nozzles, still need to add the PE TF mounts.   Sorry the pics are not better, but the I phone only gets so close.

 

Great stuff , and thanks for all of the time you spend with these builds

 

Geez Gary....Amazing work as well. Post some photos of them with the TF on them.

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Very nice! Something on the stabilators - are you sure that they will stay perfectly straight to each other, and parallel according to the wings? Maybe a better idea is first to glue/adjust the wings and then the correct angle of the stabilators... :) That`s what i came across while doing mines - first the stabilators were added and they looked perfect. But after adding the wings - i had to re-adjust one of the stabilators slightly, which somehow went not exactly well, and so i ended up by gluing it permanently in the correct neutral pose. Of course, even a slightly bigger imperfection is not visible when the stabilators are moved at certain angle, but when are straight in neutral angle...  :hmmm:

 

And, very good looking nozzle flaps as well!

 

 

Hi Milan.  I'm not sure what you mean, because the stabilators are either flat horizontal or they're not- and the wings as well.  As mentioned earlier, according to references, the wings have a 1 degree anhedral (down) angle, so they should look as flat as the eye can detect.  That's why I use the drill bits for the stabilator pins.  They are perfectly straight, won't bend and I can drill a hole matching their diameter perfectly using another drill bit of the same size.  With round sprue, it's hard to find a piece that's perfectly round without a seam line and the exact size you want.

 

If you drill the hole in the stabilator completely centered, the drill pin has no choice but to be centered within the stabilator (and flat) as you push it inward towards the center where it is much thinner than the base.  The kit hole on the outside of the fuselage lines up very well with the hole on the inside, which is also dead flat, so it's really hard to screw up IF you make sure to widen the hole exactly in the center.  Now if all that doesn't make the stabilator flat, you could still widen the hole on the inside of the fuselage, glue the pin inside in the horizontal position, then just slip on the stabilator which can still rotate.

 

Cheers,

Chuck

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