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tomprobert

1/32nd scale Avro Shackleton AEW2 - scratchbuild project

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Looking very good Tom.

Are you going to scribe the panel detail, or impress it with something like a 4H or 6H pencil?

But then I don't know how crumbly that hi-build filler will be when subjected to cold steel.

 

I couldn't help noticing that the colour of the primer where it's been sanded thin looks very close to the primer shade that unpainted Typhoons fly around in at BAe Warton.

See what you think:

 

 

I wonder if BAe are covering a multitude of sins with it on their airframes?

 

The plan is to do a full scribing job and I'll also have a go at adding the rivets, too. The primer scribes well in my previous experience, but ti needs to have been given the chance to harden fully.

 

And I too can't help wonder about the Typhoons - if their engineers are as ham-fisted as I am they'll need filler primer in an attempt to make it aerodynamic enough to fly!

 

 

All joking aside, it really is great stuff and hides a multitude of sins. This model has about 6 coats on now and it's as smooth as a baby's bum - especially when it has a micromesh polish.

 

Tom;

 

I love this build. Great save on the fuselage windows. I would have thrown a hissy fit and consigned the model to the shelf of doom! But you always seem so undaunted with these superb vacuform builds. I wish I had just an ounce of the skill you have. I have my first vac sitting on the shelf taunting me. It will probably get me certified, but I will use your threads as inspiration.

 

Can't wait for the next installment!

 

Best regards;

Steve 

 

Cheers, Steve. 

 

To be honest I'm fully prepared that mistakes will be made - it's the nature of builds like this and you have to just go with the flow. If you don't you'll never get anything completed. It's often one step forward and two steps back, but you get there in the end. With so much of this project being scratch-built it makes the task more challenging, but that's what I love about this side of the hobby. Not everyone's cup of tea I can appreciate, but I love it  :)

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Tom, loving your work mate!

Many thanks!

 

Haven't been able to get any bench time of late what with being back teaching and having a ten week old, but am hoping to get going on the fins soon!

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Saw this at the weekend, WOW is all I can say. I never got a photo, but it would of only been what Tom has already put up. Fantastic work to the highest order.

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I've been working on the fins of late, so time for an update.

 

My original plan was to use the Lancaster fins as a starting point, but I didn't realise how much larger the Shackleton's fins are, not to mention the substantial shape differences:

 

26138380174_f0fce4f9f9_c.jpg

 

The solution was to cut a plastic card template, and then copy it eight times to give me four laminated pieces per fin, which provided the correct thickness. These were then glued with polystyrene cement, clamped together and allowed to dry for 48 hours:

 

26114793803_e0f53ede53_c.jpg

 

I then started to sand the leading edges to get the aerofoil shape:

 

26112159194_8daf24c8ab_c.jpg

 

Checking the plans regularly as I went:

 

26114793193_e4b8a6d2e5_c.jpg

 

With the shape correct, I then primed each fin and added the surface details, including those famous rivets:

 

26114794213_4fc92fba73_c.jpg

 

I then inserted small metal pins into the inner surfaces of the fins, and drilled holes in the ends of the stabilisers to attach them firmly:

 

26705971536_2421546d04_c.jpg

 

I think they look passable in situ:

 

26638637572_10bd4120c5_c.jpg

 

26127916823_4b44f51a42_c.jpg

 

26731946945_97d8914be0_c.jpg

 

Until next time,

 

Tom

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The great thing about models is that they allow you to more readily appreciate the physical differences between one subject and another.

 

Being old enough to have seen Lancs and Shacks in close proximity at airshows in the past, while their common heritage was plain to see, the size difference was not.

Even when parked in close to each other.

 

I'm still amazed at how much bigger the Shack is, and how underfed the Lanc parts look in comparison.

But I think I'll have to confine my curiosity to humble 1/72 scale in this case.

Edited by Chek

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"passable"

 

Oh yes Tom, they are passable alright.. they are bloody insanely brilliant more like, I just cannot wait to see this at Telford in November - given the presence your Halifax had, this will just dominate the room..

 

as a first scratchbuilt this is really setting the standard and certainly shows that from absolutely nothing, the aeroplane you always wanted is only time and determination away..

 

keep it up :)
Peter

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you make that look so easy....

 

Thanks - but it's just a case of trial and error - nothing more - I can assure you.

 

The great thing about models is that they allow you to more readily appreciate the physical differences between one subject and another.

 

Being old enough to have seen Lancs and Shacks in close proximity at airshows in the past, while their common heritage was plain to see, the size difference was not.

Even when parked in close to each other.

 

I'm still amazed at how much bigger the Shack is, and how underfed the Lanc parts look in comparison.

But I think I'll have to confine my curiosity to humble 1/72 scale in this case.

 

Indeed - the Lanc is a tiddler in comparison. I'm looking forward to the day the HK version starts appearing on the tables at shows and with this alongside, it'll provide an interesting comparison.

 

"passable"

 

Oh yes Tom, they are passable alright.. they are bloody insanely brilliant more like, I just cannot wait to see this at Telford in November - given the presence your Halifax had, this will just dominate the room..

 

as a first scratchbuilt this is really setting the standard and certainly shows that from absolutely nothing, the aeroplane you always wanted is only time and determination away..

 

keep it up :)

Peter

 

That's high praise indeed coming from you, Peter - many thanks. Will definitely look forward to catching up at Telford.

 

The canopy area has been giving me headaches since I started this project, but a little delivery today may have the solution...

 

Knowing someone 'in the know' at HK Models (thanks Cees!) I've managed to source an early test-shot of the soon-to-be released Lancaster cockpit. This one is solid plastic but will be perfect for my needs.

 

In this picture below you can see the forward quarter and side windows of the Lancaster cockpit:

 

25908500333_78fda13329.jpg

 

Which are identical to those on the Shackleton:

 

25908500273_c3ff00f51b.jpg

 

So the plan is to use sections of this:

 

26731049471_1274b7c461_c.jpg

 

26773350486_55a68b2543_c.jpg

 

...to make up the cockpit area.

 

My plan is to drill out and open up the windows themselves, leaving the frames which will be glazed at a later date. The forward quarter and side sections will be used, with the centre-section of the wider Shackleton cockpit having frames made from plastic strip. This will then be blended with filler into the area immediately behind the cockpit and hopefully, it should do the trick.

 

That's the plan, anyway...

 

I'll keep you posted.

 

Tom

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