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Piprm

I/32nd I.D Vacform RAAF Canberra B.20

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COCKPIT - (Continued) 

 

The cockpit inner-wall build-up is done by stages... in this case - layering.

 

Like anything i do here - my general approach is :  think of a few different ways of doing a task - then pick the best idea of the bunch.

As I said previously, there is no book to go by nor instruction sheets to follow for this build... but then, I am not doing a 'normal' build here.....

more a mastering of parts  - then copying parts in resin  - utilising those parts .... progressing to the final stage build to completion. 

 

My basic approach here is very thin plastic sheet to start and then build up thicker overlays....

 

... I'll let the photos speak for themselves....

 

 

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Edited by Piprm

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Continued:

 

ZLY7fcC.jpg?1

 

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At this stage - I found the plastic T-framing was not coping with the tighter bending and had a limit,  based on the thickness of the plastic I was manipulating... before badly distorting and rendering it unusable..

 

 

LZsJ1uF.png?1

 

 

This was made more acute as I worked my way forward and the fuselage became narrower...

 

So I tried a few ideas...... 

 

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EEK! ... No way!  :oops:

 

 

 

Edited by Piprm
spacing

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Continued:

 

So, I went back to the real references and found the T- station framework was smaller in size as it went forward to the  nose-ring...

(I guess i got caught out with the mindless repetitive making of bits and pieces)  :shrug:

 

qD5CvCe.png?1

 

The photo shows a stripped bare internal forward fuselage during restoration...... but the varied thicknesses of T-frame / stations  are obvious.

...So with this reality - check... I remedied this with a simple adjustment...

 

gtRAx1U.png?1

 

The smaller T-frame is more workable and didn't distort at all with the tighter radiuses as I worked forward to the nose tip... and I'm keeping with the original aircraft specs anyways...

......(in a plastic modelling sort of way) :rolleyes:

 

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I've marked the layers to remind myself what I've done (or not done - in certain areas) 

 

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Now for my trusty soldering iron to plastic-weld the second layer to the T-framework to give the clam-shell forward fuselage structural walls some integral back-bone in this phase of contruction (mastering) 

 

 

CvXhBcH.png?1

 

 

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Yep!... I'm happy with results - so far... :)

 

 

Edited by Piprm
spacing

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Well done getting to completion of that section.

 

Though I can' help feeling you made a bit of a rod for your own back using actual T-section pieces. Its much easier to lay down a flat base plate, then using a compass cutter, cut out the correct radius of the 'stem' to lay on top of it. A little chamfering may be required but nothing too brutal.

 

Many decades ago, you were often allowed - yes even kids - to clamber about inside Canberras. Sometimes actual operational aircraft, sometimes just exhibition nose sections. Even as a small person, it seemed very dark, claustrophobiic and cramped in the rear section of the cabin, and accessing the nose blister wasn't much better. God knows how grown men in full flying kit coped, especially in turbulence.

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Guest Peterpools

Phil

Incredible work - absolutely a more then How to tutorial on building a detailing a vacuform kit.

Keep 'em comin

:popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:
Peter

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Phil

Incredible work - absolutely a more then How to tutorial on building a detailing a vacuform kit.

Keep 'em comin

:popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Peter

 

Thanks Very muchly Peter!

This is really a difficult model to build as it is... as other projects i have ready to go will be a breeze - compared to this... but in any case .. i hope my parts will make things a lot easier for those who choose to follow making a Canberra in future..

Cheers

Pip

Edited by Piprm

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On 6/4/2018 at 6:15 AM, Chek said:

Well done getting to completion of that section.

 

Though I can' help feeling you made a bit of a rod for your own back using actual T-section pieces. Its much easier to lay down a flat base plate, then using a compass cutter, cut out the correct radius of the 'stem' to lay on top of it. A little chamfering may be required but nothing too brutal.

 

Many decades ago, you were often allowed - yes even kids - to clamber about inside Canberras. Sometimes actual operational aircraft, sometimes just exhibition nose sections. Even as a small person, it seemed very dark, claustrophobiic and cramped in the rear section of the cabin, and accessing the nose blister wasn't much better. God knows how grown men in full flying kit coped, especially in turbulence.

 

 

 

Hi Chek,

Yes, i agree with everything you've said.

But working with a vacuform fuselage isn't like working with an injection fuselage... so compromise is the order of the day... don't forget, I'm working with a 1980's vacuform kit... so absolute accuracy isn't what I've got to work with...

You will also see in coming threads why I took this approach compared to the approach of cutting flat cross-sections as you suggested.

It will all make sense to you soon.

Pip

Edited by Piprm
clearer explanation

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Cockpit Walls (Continued):

 

After much thought, I have decided to do a 'Generic' interior.... mostly in the area of the cockpit walls, as I realise that most modellers using these future resin copies, will probably be doing a different mark of the Canberra Bomber - according to what Airforce they choose to represent.

And as such, the layout of the cockpit differs to varying degrees, between each model or mark. The following photos gives you a case in point....

 

Photo 1: RAAF B-20

uSODLNm.png?1

 

Photo 2: RAF B1

 

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Both are right-side to rear areas and you can see the differences in ancillary equipment attached to the side-walls. 

This applies over the entire cockpit areas with variations of the equipment from Mark to Mark and between each  different nations operational requirements. 

So, since I can only do one cockpit 'lay-out'  ....I will keep it a simple 'Generic' version and have just the bare walls and leave others to fit-out the cockpit walls with equipment relevant to the Mark or Model version they choose to construct.

Thankfully, the bare walls for each mark are all the same, so I will focus on that. (for this phase of making masters)

 

OK, the first area I need to start is the alignment of the small rear compartment windows for the exterior /interior.

Here is Photos for your reference...

 

hGD4j8J.jpg?1

 

Top rear of cockpit (exterior) 

 

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Interior view of same windows....

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

 

 

Exterior Navigators window rear compartment  (side-fuselage) 

 

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Interior view of small port-window....

 

Both the inner-wall shell I am making with window recesses have to match up with outside dimensions and placements.

So with the help of the Scale drawings for exterior window placement and inner build-up of walls  - I must test-drill' 

the windows to check for accuracy of placement - inside and out.

 

The outside markings of the windows on inner-wall placements must line - up.....

 

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I use a small hand-drill so I can have more control of these 'test- bores'......

 

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... To my relief... all windows line up!  :P

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Piprm
adding extra words

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Here's a peek into my thought processes...

 

e1sKaxy.jpg?1

 

I usually try and clarify my ideas to paper so i can 'see' what is possible or possibly not... In this case  it shows my thoughts towards cockpit wall about 6 months ago and the 'approach'.. 

 

Back to the Cockpit... (Cont) 

 

The next in line is the wall fabric liner - which, is shown in following photo study ....

 

nPcsdPs.jpg?1

 

All gaps and cavities between the fuselage stations through the entire cockpit areas are filled with this fabric inner-liner... with stitching and textures and contours...

So how to reproduce this in a convincing way?.... I had nobody tapping me on the shoulder with any suggestions as to the 'right way' to go about it... 

So,  I came up with a few ideas,  but i chose the following....

 

a simple butter container aluminium seal.

 

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Stationery sourced  'Blu-Tak' was the weapon of choice here to a means of applying the liner to the inner-walls.

 

The photos continue the story....

 

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Did I get the effect i was searching for? :tumble:Erh!... not that excited really!

 

 

 

Edited by Piprm
spelling and diction

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