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Shane aka Smokey

WnW Virgin needs help

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Hi Guys,

 

I'm dipping my toe into the deep end, and purchasing a Wingnuts Albatross. From what I've seen there's no need to buy the usual mound of aftermarket bits and pieces for this kit, but I would like your input on the following;

 

(a) Is there any aftermarket item that you think would greatly enhance the finished model?

 

(B) Decals - I love applying decals (yes, I'm a freak) and would prefer to use woodgrain decals instead of making an attempt to replicate wood in paint, so do you have any suggestions as to which brand to use (and what decalling solutions work well with them)

 

© Rigging - aka the scariest modelling thing.

(1) Fittings -

(i) How do I determine what type of turnbuckly type thing I need to fit and where?

(ii) Where do I source good quality turnbuckley things ? (preferably in Australia or thereabouts)

 

(2) Wires

(i) Whats a good beginner friendly material to use?

(ii) I understand that IRL the rigging had different profiles - Is this an issue with the Albatross, and if so is the difference discernible in this scale?

 

(d) Talent - where do I buy some, and how much does it cost?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Smokey

 

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Hi Smokey!

 

 

Welcome to WnW addiction.

 

For start, if you want to use wood decals, I would tell you to go uschi ones, that you can get at, http://www.uschivdr.com/

 

For turnbuckles, the best you can get are Gaspatch Models ones (http://www.gaspatchmodels.com/products/metal-turnbuckles-32.html) but they are expensive. You can see several pcis on wnw website and Albatross instructions that for sure will help you choose the turnbuckle type. I personally go for the Bob Buckles.

 

As for rigging, you got EZline (that you can get directly for Wnw) and fishing wire.

 

Fran

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Smokey,

I do not know how much experience you have in making models, especially with biplanes, wires, etc. Thus my advice would be to buy an inexpensive 1/32 biplane, like one of those Hobbycraft Nieuport 17's or Academy Camels selling for $15 these days and try making one of those first. That way you will gain experience and if you totally mess it up then you are out only a few dollars. Also, since there will be less pressure on you because it is not a hundred dollar kit you are learning on you can relax and not only do a better job  but actually enjoy it more.

Lower anxiety = more enjoyment.

Stephen

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Oups, at the first glance, i thought that the Virgin was a WW1 aircraft i did not know...

 

First, you just have to know that WW1 aircraft models are scary, but are not that difficult to build, at least for WNW kits.

 

I dont think that any after market stuff is really needed for a WNW kit. You may want to buy AM guns, though, even if the MG's from the box are already very good, with included PE parts. But AM gun barrels and sheath from Master are easier to use than the kit PE as they are milled so they are stronger. You may also want to buy fabric belts instead of the PE belts included in the kit. But that's really all one may want to add to such a kit.

 

Regarding the decals, most Albatros have painted wings, but if you need some lozenge printed fabric, there are very nice decals from Aviattic, Wood and Wire or HGW.

For the wood grain, it's pretty easy to paint. But you can find nice decals from Uschi or HGW.

 

For the rigging, i think that the easier way is to use EZ line, it's a flexible media that makes rigging a piece of cake.

The best looking turnbuckles are those from Gaspatch, but they are the cheapest and may not be the easier nor the faster to use. You can also simply use small bits of micro tubes and buckles made of spinned thin metal wire. You can also buy some from Bob's Buckles.

 

And regarding the talent, i'm sure that you already have more than necessary to build this Albatros ! :)

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1.Check out Pheon decals. They have a variety of schemes for many WW1 kits.

2. As Fran pointed out, both Gaspatch models and Bob's buckles have products that can be used for rigging. I use a combination of the two.

3. Both EZ line and small diameter monofilament fishing line can be used to simulate the wire. Some aircraft (British) had flat wire. My solution is to ignore that and stick with monofilament but flat wire is available I believe.

4. Talent- If/when you figure that out let me know :)

v/r,

Rob

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Smokey,

I do not know how much experience you have in making models, especially with biplanes, wires, etc. Thus my advice would be to buy an inexpensive 1/32 biplane, like one of those Hobbycraft Nieuport 17's or Academy Camels selling for $15 these days and try making one of those first. That way you will gain experience and if you totally mess it up then you are out only a few dollars. Also, since there will be less pressure on you because it is not a hundred dollar kit you are learning on you can relax and not only do a better job  but actually enjoy it more.

Lower anxiety = more enjoyment.

Stephen

 

That's a bit true, but on the other hand a "basic" WNW (i mean a single seater fighter, and not a Fe.2b or a Gotha bomber or a Felixstowe) is easier to build than any other kit, with good fit and explicite instructions.

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Keep in mind also that the tolerances on WNW kits are tight; layers of paint can cause fit issues.

Quoted for truth. Make sure *all* mating surfaces a free of paint before trying to glue them together - even a thin layer of paint from an airbrush can throw things out.

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Guest Clunkmeister

Hey Shane,

 

Welcome to the worls of WW1 modeling.

 

I will entirely disagree with Stephen on his statement that the Hobbycraft or other brand of kits are easier. THEY'RE NOT.  And here's why:

 

Wingnut Wings kits are highly engineered to fit almost to perfection the first time around. If something doesn't fit, there's a problem and you have to find the problem before proceeding, or the rest of the model won't fit.

 

Hobbycraft kits like the Nieuport are nice and simple, but can be vague and require you understanding how these things go together. If you don't understand flying and landing wires, cabanes and interplanes, and how a WW1 aircraft was actually rigged, you'll have a much tougher time and have a good chance of getting discouraged.

 

The Albatros is a good choice for a beginner kit.

So is the Junkers J.1. or the Hansa Brandenberg W.12 or W.29.  All require woodgrain and decaling skills, but the rigging is minimal on all of those kits.

Also, as a general rule, German types, along with being more colorful, generally are easier to rig because they used less of it.

 

I personally use fishing line and a combination of turnbuckles. I paint all my woodgrain as well, but that may change....

 

Good luck, and feel free to PM any questions. I'll answer honestly and help any way I can.

 

Ernie

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Ernie, except the Junkers J.1 which doesn't have rigging at all, the aircraft with the less rigging is the Fokker D.VII, if i remember correctly, there is only 2 wires on each wing, plus a few control cables.

The Albatros has more wires to fix, but that's not a big deal, just a few hours of calm and concentration.

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Guest Clunkmeister

Agreed on all counts!  The D.Vll I forgot about. A GREAT kit for an experienced modeler to tackle.

 

I'm no big expert, obviously, but I really like the Alb as a beginner's kit, simply because of the low parts count.

Actually, if you're OK with British, the Pup is pretty good too, but you have those double flying wires to deal with...

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The pup is the first WNW i've finished and i really enjoyed this build. In fact the rigging was a bit frightening, but was not very difficult with a bit of strategy. Drilling a hole, gluing a buckle, threading the EZ line in the buckle, threading a microtube around the EZ line and passing the other end of the line inside the tube as well, thighting the whole stuff, droping a small drop of glue and that all. You repeat it a few dozens of times and that's over.

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