Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Guest DeanKB

Surely HK have dodged a bullet here?

 

Distributors know their markets better than anybody. If they say it would not sell in sufficient numbers, they are probably correct.

 

It's surely better than HK ending up investing substantial amounts of money in box-loads of kit's that they can't shift?

 

The US market is just too small. I'd have thought this sort of kit would be perfect for resin or short-run.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely HK have dodged a bullet here?

 

[...]

 

It's surely better than HK ending up investing substantial amounts of money in box-loads of kit's that they can't shift?

 

Just to clarify, we're talking about Kitty Hawk (KH) here, not Hong Kong Models (HK)...lest somebody get confused and run off to the Internet with the wrong-coloured ball.

 

Kev

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DeanKB

Just to clarify, we're talking about Kitty Hawk (KH) here, not Hong Kong Models (HK)...lest somebody get confused and run off to the Internet with the wrong-coloured ball.

 

Kev

 

Oops - my apologies, the old eyes are not what they once were!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess what we all need to understand is that we are a very small minority of modellers. Sales depend more on the average guy buying the kit than us and that's exactly how the overseas distributors see it as well. Will the average modeller buy it. Sorry to see many peoples hopes shattered but Kitty hawk must make a profit so we can all hopefully get the one aircraft we have waited years for.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Subjects need a combat record and/or loads of optional stores to hang under the wings or from weapons bays.

 

The F11F Tiger doesn't score on either criteria.

 

The lack-lustre interest from Asia and Europe doesn't surprise me at all. It is a niche USA subject.

 

Tony

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Peterpools

We keep accepting the fact the US/Canadian market is too small to worry about and if we left, the Chinese and Japanese manufacturers wouldn't care or even know we're gone. I absolutely don't believe that for a second. Why would Tamiya be located in California for distribution if we're so small and unimportant? Surely not for the tax advantage - maybe for the beautiful California weather? Just show me the hard numbers of how small of a market we are; real numbers not I heard or think. I'm sure we account for a nice chunk of change in sales and if not, why bother with us at all?
There is no way in the world we are small patatoes and our business isn't wanted or needed.
Peter

Edited by Peterpools
Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a lot more love for WW2, Vietnam, Gulf One era or anything that flew in Israeli markings.

 

It has surprised me no end that it's taken two firms (Kinetic and Italeri) fifteen years to put new tool Mirage III/5s on the radar.

 

I'm sure if somebody in England made a 1/32 kit of the Supermarine Swift or Folland Gnat its market in the USA and Asia would be almost nil.

 

There is, however, a large number of mainstream subjects that deserve kitting, and I'll spare people the usual subjective litany.

 

Tony

Edited by Tony T
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DeanKB

We keep accepting the fact the US/Canadian market is too small to worry about and if we left, the Chinese and Japanese manufacturers wouldn't care or even know we're gone. I absolutely don't believe that for a second. Why would Tamiya be located in California for distribution if we're so small and unimportant? Surely not for the tax advantage - maybe for the beautiful California weather? Just show me the hard numbers of how small of a market we are; real numbers not I heard or think. I'm sure we account for a nice chunk of change in sales and if not, why bother with us at all?

There is no way in the world we are small patatoes and our business isn't wanted or needed.

Peter

 

It's a numbers game, both for markets and subjects;

 

Europe - has a strong market for plastic model building, as show by hosting several manufacturers - not distributors, manufacturers. 350 million people.

 

Japan - as Europe, but even more so. Supports some niche's largely on it's own. 127 million.

 

China - the coming market in a big, big way. Most kit's manufactured here, close to huge Japanese market. 1,400 million.

 

Australasia - Small, but comparatively wealthy. 40 million. 

 

USA - Wealthy, but supports only niche manufacturers. 350 million.

 

Then you look at the subject, an F11F. With respect, outside of North America, few would even know of this planes existence. Yes, looks sexy - but as it never saw action, had a short life and equipped only a few units, it's pretty much a forgotten piece of history.

 

It may not help with perspective that there are so many of them on display in the USA - 15. As only some 230 were ever built, that's astounding to me.

 

So a combination of a subject of some anonymity - at least outside the US - together with a small potential market, means it's not going to make anybody any money. And that's ultimately why kits are made - not because the are cool, or historic, but simply to make money. (Unless you are Wingnut Wings & have a multi-millionaire owner who like model aeroplane kits).

Edited by DeanKB
Link to post
Share on other sites

We keep accepting the fact the US/Canadian market is too small to worry about and if we left, the Chinese and Japanese manufacturers wouldn't care or even know we're gone. I absolutely don't believe that for a second. Why would Tamiya be located in California for distribution if we're so small and unimportant? Surely not for the tax advantage - maybe for the beautiful California weather?

Peter

 

Tamiya offers a lot more than plastic models.  The US, comparatively wealthy and with space, has a large RC market.  Where I live, all plastic model hobby shops have closed with only RC Model shops (some have a small stock of static models) being the norm.

 

Regards,

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DeanKB

Rest of world not interested?

 

I think it would sell well - especially with a shark mouth on the box lid - and I'm a Brit.

 

Iain

 

I'm sure it would sell, but just not in sufficient numbers to turn a profit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Compared to some other subjects that have been released of late - I'd respectfully disagree (disty channels, pricing models, volumes and margins aside - as we have no knowledge of their specific business model).

 

To my eyes this is one of the aviation icons of the '50s - but others' mileage obviously varies! :frantic:

 

Whether you've heard of it before, or not - it's a very appealing/interesting looking airframe and, I'm sure with a lot of modellers and buying public, that can count for a lot of sales. It's also fairly compact in 1:32 scale.

 

Wonder how well Hasegawa's 1:72 offering has done over the years?

 

F11f_grumman_tiger.jpg

 

I suspect the distributors might be surprised - but then it's not going to happen now - so I'll have to dig out my part built ID kit again!  :)

 

Iain

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DeanKB

I suppose that the distributors have the knowledge & experience to make the call?

 

Perhaps KH could do a WNW & sell direct, cut out the distributors all together?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless they've marketed a 1:32 F11 Tiger before I'd argue that it's as much guesswork to them as it is to the rest of us IMHO ;)

 

But if the disty's won't pick it up...

 

And it's not our investment at stake...

 

Anyhow - can't keep up with what's coming out these days anyway! :)

 

But a Tiger would have been ace from my perspective.

 

<wanders loft side to look for my ID project> #sidetrackedagain!

 

Anyway - at the rate we're going it wouldn't surprise me at all if we do eventually see a 1:32 Tiger from somewhere...

 

Iain

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...