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chuck540z3

1/32 P-38L "Kicked Up A Notch". Jan 15/16: FINISHED!

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That is some really good looking work Chuck!  But...... this is another one of those moments that I feel i need to interject for anyone doing a P-38 from 1944-45.  The P-38 never used the K-14 gunsight in combat.  Nor did it ever use the N-9 gunsight ....ever!  The P-38 only used two sights in it's combat life, those being the N-3 through the J-5 model, and the Linn L-3 through the L model.  I know the resource you are using for this information, and I know that some really bad assumptions were made using photographs showing a test installation.  And I contributed to this book, so I was very dismayed to see that information in the final product.  Anyway, it in no way detracts from what you are doing, as you have the license to do what you will in the criteria you have chosen.  But, for those wishing to build a spec P-38, the N-3 and L-3 are the ones that were actually used in combat. 

 

Sorry if I'm being "that guy", but this is one of my hot button points.

 

John 

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Ha!  That is one of the reasons I went for the "restored" or "what if" look.  For my F-4E, P-51D and other builds, I tried to stay as close to what was accurate for the time period I was trying to portray, which was both fun and sometimes painful.  My "source" as you know, is on page 19 of "that" book.  Oh well, I care, because to tell you the truth, almost none of the restored P-38's still have a gun sight at all any more.  It looks like it really gets in your front vision and if the guns don't work anyway, why have it?

 

Thanks again John for keeping us on the most accurate path for those who wish to keep their P-38 build true to a particular time period.  I value your input, so please keep it coming if not for me, for those who might benefit from your specific knowledge of the Lightning.

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Man that cockpit just totally rocks, even if some of the stuff in it isn't totally accurate. Wish I could do that level of detail - my eyes are not what they used to be.

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Man that cockpit just totally rocks, even if some of the stuff in it isn't totally accurate. Wish I could do that level of detail - my eyes are not what they used to be.

 

 

You have made so many awesome parts from scratch Jay, that those eyes must see something!  If you're having difficulty seeing stuff up close, here's a tip you might be interested in, since I have the same problem- or at least had.

 

There are lots of closeup magnifying glasses on the market, some with big headsets and lights that look heavy and cumbersome to me, so I sort of "invented" a pair of glasses for myself.  At 60, my close-up vision started to leave about 10 years ago and by 55, I was wearing progressive lenses.  These lenses have normal vision at the top, corrected or not, with lenses on the bottom that are better to see items fairly closely, like maybe a book or newspaper at 12 to 18 inches. The lenses overlap, so that you "progress" from one to the other almost seamlessly.  Unfortunately the close-up lenses on progressives are not very good for real close-up work like modeling, so ordinary "magnifiers" with varying degrees of magnification of +1, +2, +3 and everything in between are needed as well, so you are always changing glasses as you look around your workbench.

 

To solve this problem, I had some ordinary bi-focal lenses made, but instead of having your normal vision at the top of the lens, I had the lower portion of the progressives placed at the top and a magnifier of +1.75 on the bottom.  To get as much working area as possible in the lens, I chose a tall circular "Harry Potter" lens, which allows me to rotate my head less often, as I tilt my head up to see through the bottom or tilt my head back down to see through the top.  With modern looking glasses that are narrow and popular these days, there is not much room from top to bottom, so you would be tilting your head up and down constantly to see anything.  With these glasses on, I have super clear vision from literally 2 inches to 2 feet, which is good enough for most modeling tasks.  I don't even have to tilt my head that often, because I just place my work lower when I need close-ups and higher when I don't.  I just love them and they were not expensive, because bi-focals are much cheaper than progressives.

 

 

CloseupGlasses.jpg

 

 

Now a bit of an update, albeit small.  In my first post I documented how poorly the main wing section was created straight out of the box, with damage to the trailing edge caused at the factory, because nothing else was damaged.  With lots of work with liquid sprue and a heat gun, I think I've got it repaired so you will never notice after everything is glued together.

 

Well, I found some more factory flaws, this time a real big one on the nose where the guns go.  Nice, right at the front where everyone looks!

 

 

Factoryflaw4.jpg

 

 

A close-up.

 

 

Factoryflaw5.jpg

 

 

The culprit is “pin damage†that creates the pin marks we all hate, as the plastic is ejected from the mold from behind.  This “pin†is L-shaped, and literally crushed the front of the nose cap.  Note the circular pin marks to the right, which is a more normal occurrence.

 

 

Factoryflaw6.jpg

 

 

 

Other parts of the fuselage are quite rough and the rivet and panel detail too shallow, like the belly below the cockpit.

 

 

Factoryflaw1.jpg

 

 

The gun shroud panel is poorly cast as well….

 

 

Factoryflaw2.jpg

 

 

 

What is more common is better rivet detail, like this on the bottom wing, but with HUGE sprue attachments that are very difficult to remove without leaving a mark.

 

 

 

Factoryflaw3.jpg

 

 

 

So what's my point?  I need a lot of time to repair and smooth out these items and I'm taking a break from modeling to catch some sun, so my next update will be a few weeks off if I'm lucky.  Thanks again for your continued interest in this challenging build.

 

Chuck

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Hi Vandy:

 

 

 

I think you mean Gary Levitz, not Tony LeVier. Gary raced that airplane till its gear collapsed in the pits at Reno, I think in '83.

 

John

 

 

You are right Johnny

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Thanks guys for the info!

 

March 15/15

 

A small update, but after a lot of work.  As noted above, the trailing edge of the aileron looked weird because there was an overlapping tab that seemed too long on the bottom.  A quick review of reference pics shows that this tab exists on the bottom, but I couldn't find the same thing on the top due to lack of good pics, so I was worried that Trumpeter might have put the tab on the wrong side, which is not a stretch for Trumpeter!  As a matter of fact, when reviewing other builds of this kit, I found that some modelers had actually sanded the tab off because they might have thought it was flash and I even saw one build with the ailerons upside down!

 

Thanks to Vandy and John, I now know that this tab exists on the top and bottom.  Here's a pic of one of them from the top showing the fixed tab and trailing edge extension.  As with the other parts on this build, every panel line was re-scribed and every rivet re-punched, so I added some dark wash to show the detail.

 

 

Aileron1.jpg

 

 

To replicate the same the same thing on the bottom ,all I did was to scribe a thin tab to match the top.  

Being on the bottom, this is definitely “good enoughâ€!

 

 

Aileron2.jpg

 

 

All of the other flaps and the elevator were assembled and I spent a great deal of time getting them to look as good as possible, using lots of CA glue to fill small gaps and repair many flaws .  One item often missed by modelers is to get the trailing edges super sharp and thin, which you can barely see in this pic.

 

 

Aileron3.jpg

 

 

Since this build is supposedly “kicked up a notchâ€, I thought I should improve the gun sight, which is supplied by the kit and Cutting Edge resin set as the more commonly used N-9, which is quite boring looking, as seen on the left of this pic.  Fortunately, I still have a really nice K-14 gun sight from my Tamiya P-51D build leftover, which is made from 2 regular plastic, 3 clear plastic and one photo-etch brass part as shown on the right.  Some P-38's had them, so this bird must as well!

 

 

Gunsight%20parts.jpg

 

 

Using the same methods I used to paint and detail the cockpit, I cut off the N-9 gun sight and modified the K-14 to fit the existing kit gun sight arm, although I will need to add a cross brace to the front windscreen when I get that far in order for it to look more accurate.  Here it is dry fitted in the cockpit with tape.

 

 

K-14-1.jpg

 

 

A close-up from the left side.  Not only did those Barracuda stencils come in handy, a couple of them are actually made for this very part!

 

 

K-14-2.jpg

 

 

 

From the rear you can see the rear and front glass, which is often not covered by the black shroud on top.  I added an electrical cord to the back of the sight according to references.

 

 

K-14-3.jpg

 

 

 

The other side.  Here you can see the grip detail of the Cutting Edge resin steering wheel fairly well

 

 

 

K-14-4.jpg

 

 

 

This angle shows the two circular lenses under the glass, which were a bear to mask off properly before painting.

 

 

 

K-14-5.jpg

 

 

 

A little closer.

 

 

K-14-6.jpg

 

 

 

 

All in all a fairly successful modification if I do say so myself.  Thanks for checking in!

Very nice. And I thought mine turned out nice, but yours puts mine to shame !..........Harv :popcorn:

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Before I leave on vacation, a huge shout out to Peter at "Airscale Model Aircraft Enhancements"!  In prior discussions in this thread concerning the instrument panel decals and brass gauges available at Airscale, Peter reached out to me and sent me some of his products for my use and review.  WOW!  I only wish I had this stuff a few weeks ago when I started the cockpit, because there are many decals I used that would have been better with Airscale products.  Next time!  These photoetch brass gauges, cockpit items and tiny decals are awesome.  I know, I know, I'm preaching to the choir and many of you guys use Peter's stuff already, but if you don't, here is his website and the prices are very reasonable for such a quality product:

 

Airscale Model Aircraft Enhancements

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Hey Chuck, thanks for the updates.  I LOVE what you are doing here and you inspire me with my builds.  You are correct, Peters Stuff is awesome!

 

As regards the new specs, I think you have made a good call.  I am an Optician during the daytime and all too often I see people just using +2.00 or whatever magnifiers and although it makes things bigger it hasnt actually corrected the problem, which is usually astigmatism etc. When people actually correct their vision rather than just magnify  it they cant believe the difference in clarity. Although having said that I am needing to listen to my own advice :hmmm: .....my near vision has always been good, however I am now finding my arms need to be longer...Lol. :whistle:

 

Have a great holiday!

 

Cheers

Anthony

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Just used some of Peters stuff a couple days ago on my OV-10A...........your 100% correct, Peter is one of the best modelers we have on the site, and by far and away, one of the most generous too.

 

He generously sent me some of his products as well a long while back for a contest we were running...........super products from a super guy!!

Edited by Out2gtcha

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Guest Peterpools

Absolutely, 100% agree; Peter's talent (Airscale) and generosity is amazing. Ask a question and he is right there. Need a tutorial and bingo; it's there. His craftsmanship and modeling skills, normally leave me in awe and wishing I could work to a tenth of his level. 

Best of all, we share the same birthday. and first names of course :rolleyes:

Peter

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A brief update, mostly to indicate there really is no update.  No, I haven't lost interest in this project, but with spring coming early to western Canada, chores that needed to be done around the house for a long time, a bit of golf and now travel to Britain for most of May coming up, I have discovered that I actually have a life outside of modeling.  Who knew!  That's not to say I've done absolutely no modeling, but it hasn't been much.  My current task on this build has been to sand down the wings and central fuselage parts to remove many flaws and blemishes in the plastic, then re-scribe every panel line and re-punch every rivet.  EVERY SINGLE ONE, which has been very slow and tedious, but with a new metal finish, it's really necessary if you want it to look good after painting. Hopefully I can get back with an update sometime in June that is worth showing.

Cheers for now,
Chuck

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God almightly - its like a time machine back to 1944.  Being a P-51 efficienado (only because I am a member if the P-51 SIG), I think I am in a position to know.  How did you attain that level of realism?  Personally I have the North American drawing set on DVD.   

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Well, I'm finally back, but I still have no modeling progress to show.  Vacation, work and nice weather are reducing my free time and desire to model, so progress will continue at a snail's pace until the snow flies once again.  Oh well, this build is going nowhere and I have no real deadlines, so I'll model once again when I feel like it.

That's not to say I've done nothing associated with modeling lately.  Today was the annual Western Canadian Regional Model Contest, which was held at the Bomber Command Museum at Nanton with about 450 entries.  This museum holds many vintage aircraft, including one of only 4 Lancasters left in the world with running Merlin engines.  Here it is on one of two "engine runs" held today.  What a noise!

Lanc1.jpg

Lanc2.jpg


The model contest is held within the hanger where the Lancaster is usually parked.  Very cool venue next to real aircraft....


Contest1_1.jpg


I brought my 1/32 Trumpeter (Kit from Hell) A-10A Warthog, converted to an A-10C, to see how it would do.


Contest2_1.jpg


But I had plenty of competition in the 1/32 Super Detailed class, including these 2 German WWII beauties...

Contest3_1.jpg
Contest4.jpg


This F-15E was really nice too.


Contest5.jpg


But the real competition was this Israeli F-16.  Very sweet, with a killer base to boot...


Contest6.jpg


So how did the A-10 do at the contest?  Pretty darn good if I do say so myself.  Gold in the above category and a few extra special awards.  The GOMBS award has a great pic of the late Rick Chin next to a real A-10.  How neat is that!


Contest7_1.jpg
 

 

Very satisfying indeed.  Stuff like this gets me super motivated to enter another model next year, with a Trumpeter P-38 perhaps?  Time will tell.

BTW, it was really nice to meet (or re-meet) several of you fellow modelers at the contest who frequent this board.  It was great talking to you all and I hope to see you again soon.

Edited by chuck540z3

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