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scvrobeson

Banshee or Phantom?

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I have to say that although these would be very welcome additions to any collection I think Paul should stick with the smaller stuff for now.

1/32 scale Trainers are very often neglected and I hope that he sticks with these for a while.

My own preference would be for a lovely Curtiss A-12 Shrike to go with the PT-22.

A Culver PQ-14 would also be very welcome,something different and something an IM manufacturer would never touch.

I'm sure a very viable nice niche market can be found here for models like these for someone if not Fisher Models.

We'll see over time I guess.

 

 

 

He said "Shrike". I can't even imagine how cool it would be to have the A-8 and A-12 Shrikes from Paul's expert hands. War Games Camo anyone?

 

Tnarg

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There is no comparison because you are comparing apples with oranges. A vacuform is a sketch, a beginning for a real craftsman to show his stuff. Larry Hawkins comes to mind. He could take a vac and make it look like the best resin or injection molded item. A resin kit and a injection molded kit are kits where all the pieces are already made and all the modeler has to do is assemble them. Building all three types are interesting challenges and the builder can certainly get plenty of satisfaction (and frustration) from building them. But they are different animals.

Stephen

 

 

Maybe thats how you are with injection kits, but I know personally from actually building quite a few of them that this is definitely not the case. Even the best of the best (WnW kits comes to mind as well as FM&P) "kits" require substantial investments in time, research, and a personal passion for the hobby in most cases to turn a box of all gray resin or plastic into a work of art.

 

I read a reference to "assembling" kits, and people who actually build kits as "assemblers" from you quite a bit Stephen....................some who regard their hard work and substantial personal investments in time and passion for the hobby as their art, may take a bit of offense. Just a repeated observation you may want to take note of.

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I respectfully disagree with the quoted statement below. Those of us who build plastic/resin kits are "kit assemblers" as much as movie actors are "people that stand in front of a camera reciting memorized lines". There's way more to being an actor than just put on a costume and memorize scripts. The actor may not have written the script, or stitched together the costume, or designed the props, or operated the camera/lights, but what he/she does is drawing the audience into the story. The really good performances convey emotions and make the viewers relate to them even though they are perfectly aware that it's all just an act.

 

With scale models, sure, the difficult work of manufacturing the parts is not done by the kit builder. What the builder provides is bringing disparate chunks of plastic and resin to a cohesive whole that draws people attention and admiration. I've picked up my jaw from the floor multiple times for seeing beautifully finished, highly detailed models. But I wouldn't be so impressed if the same models were presented to me as unpainted plastic parts still on sprues, uncut decal sheets, and jars of paint.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Terry

 

A resin kit and a injection molded kit are kits where all the pieces are already made and all the modeler has to do is assemble them.

Edited by IBuildEmBig

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I have always wondered what the big deal with the "assembler" word was. No matter where you start, you have to work to build a model. Even if it were a snap together kit or a lego, you have to do some work. While WNW kits are one end of the spectrum, most of us have faced the problems of a resin, vac, limited run injection kit that caused us to use materials not included in the kit to create the detail we want.

 

It is all a matter of degree. We all make the choice of what material to start with. Did the creator of a scratch built model also cut down the tree and dry out the wood, then cut it into the proper shapes to make the master for a piece of his model? Did the person who used resin to cast a part actually make the resin himself from component chemicals?

 

Some paths are quicker than others. If we see a reasonable path to our goal, we can go down that path, then cut a swath through the remaining jungle and get to the end. The one who cut their own way first through the jungle did something of value, and can be appreciated by those that follow, but we all express our creativity wherever we work at it.

 

We appreciate and admire Paul and team for the amazing creativity and efforts they took to cut this path through the jungle. So much so that we pay him and ask for more. Please, Sir, could we have some more?

 

Tnarg

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I just hope that the licensing problems that companies face won't make it so that we'll never see a kit of these planes. The early era of jet aviation is one that is so bright and interesting, it's a shame that there aren't more kits out there. I know Classic Airframes had announced a Banshee series before they went under, but no one seems to have picked up the torch from those products. And Collect-Aire made a Pirate, and Czech Model made a Skyknight, but there really has been nothing in LSP-land besides what Fisher has done, and assorted Sabre kits, and the F-80 Shooting Star kit.

 

 

 


Matt :party0023:

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Sorry but unless it just isnt available elsewhere i couldn't get into a Vac build - as it takes too long to perfect and there are too many other easier and quicker kits to be built.

Reminds me of someone saying "we would still be playing with sticks and wood to make kits -" i forget the direct quote but that's just me

 

not a craftsman but a modeller who knows what he wants from his own kits....

Ohh a Phantom for me!

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As McDonnell and Douglas are under the Boeing corporate "umbrella" I suspect the same concerns would exist!

 

Barry

 

That didn't seem to stop the release of the F4D. Back on point, I believe I'd prefer the Banshee over the early Phantom.

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I know Paul has an interest in the F2H-2 Banshee as I once had a conversation with him about it and sent him some info. He was then working on the begining of what is now the Cutless. I'd prefer the F2H-2 Banshee to go with the other Korean war aircraft he has done. Then if Paul would only make a Sikosky S-51 after a Banshee I would have all my USN Aircraft from the Korean war.

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