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TimW

B-25 Interior Painting

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So...

 

Has anyone besides me noted that the HK kit has absolutely no painting instructions for the interior of the aircraft?

 

I suppose I'm going to have to dig out the Accurate Miniatures kit (or a Monogram kit) to get some idea of what to do (apart from needing a lot of Bronze Green).

 

Anybody else have thoughts on how to approach this?

 

Fortunately, much of the Eduard PE is pre-painted so some of the details are taken care of.

 

Bemused,

 

Tim W.

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Interior was painted interior green. The bomb bay and well whells were left natural metal as were the inside of the landing gear doors. The langing gear was painted aluminium.

HTH

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So...

 

Has anyone besides me noted that the HK kit has absolutely no painting instructions for the interior of the aircraft?

 

I suppose I'm going to have to dig out the Accurate Miniatures kit (or a Monogram kit) to get some idea of what to do (apart from needing a lot of Bronze Green).

 

Anybody else have thoughts on how to approach this?

 

Fortunately, much of the Eduard PE is pre-painted so some of the details are taken care of.

 

Bemused,

 

Tim W.

According to North American B-25 Mitchell - The Ultimate Look, p. 156:

 

"All interior metal surfaces exposed to view, other than the pilot's and radio operator's compartments, were finished with aluminized spar varnish. The finish in the pilot's and radio operator's compartments exposed metal surfaces were finshed as specified in two coats of Pine Green (over a coat of primer), or one coat of Light or Dark Grey Duco. . . . The fabric covering over the soundproofing in the pilot's and radio operator's compartments was finished in acetate dope. All corrugated metal flooring, other than that in the soundproof compartment, was given a final coat of aluminized spar varnish."

 

It goes on to specifiy colors for structural components, electrical, hydraulic and fuel lines, but this description is too lengthy to repeat here.

 

If you want what is probably the best B-25 reference available, I highly recommend this book.

 

Jerry Peterson

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According to North American B-25 Mitchell - The Ultimate Look, p. 156:

 

"All interior metal surfaces exposed to view, other than the pilot's and radio operator's compartments, were finished with aluminized spar varnish. The finish in the pilot's and radio operator's compartments exposed metal surfaces were finshed as specified in two coats of Pine Green (over a coat of primer), or one coat of Light or Dark Grey Duco. . . . The fabric covering over the soundproofing in the pilot's and radio operator's compartments was finished in acetate dope. All corrugated metal flooring, other than that in the soundproof compartment, was given a final coat of aluminized spar varnish."

 

It goes on to specifiy colors for structural components, electrical, hydraulic and fuel lines, but this description is too lengthy to repeat here.

 

If you want what is probably the best B-25 reference available, I highly recommend this book.

 

Jerry Peterson

 

 

Thanks, Jerry.

That's something that should be on every Mitchell builder's "Get List"

 

 

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In my researches, I've been in contact with several Royal Air Force B-25 Mitchell pilots and crew members. They all recalled a rather dark green color in the cockpit and manned spaces. This could be, unless North American had their own "Pine Green" aka. North American Green in one publication, Bronze Green or Dull Dark Green. This green color was used by North American Inglewood on all of their a/c until stocks ran out sometime in 1944, only then being replaced by Interior Green. On Kansas City- and Dallas-built a/c, Interior Green was used from the start.

 

Interior Green did not emerge as an approved and designated color until very late 1942, with stocks of the color reaching the a/c manufacturers in the spring of 1943. Stocks of any earlier interior finish were used up before the new color came into use.

 

Stein

Edited by A340 Pilot

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In my researches, I've been in contact with several Royal Air Force B-25 Mitchell pilots and crew members. They all recalled a rather dark green color in the cockpit and manned spaces. This could be, unless North American had their own "Pine Green" aka. North American Green in one publication, Bronze Green or Dull Dark Green. This green color was used by North American Inglewood on all of their a/c until stocks ran out sometime in 1944, only then being replaced by Interior Green. On Kansas City- and Dallas-built a/c, Interior Green was used from the start.

 

Interior Green did not emerge as an approved and designated color until very late 1942, with stocks of the color reaching the a/c manufacturers in the spring of 1943. Stocks of any earlier interior finish were used up before the new color came into use.

 

Stein

 

Thanks--this all helps. I plan on using bronze green for most of the visible/crew spaces with an unpainted bomb bay and wheel wells.

 

Cheers,

 

Tim W.

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Guest TimC
This green color was used by North American Inglewood on all of their a/c until stocks ran out sometime in 1944, only then being replaced by Interior Green. On Kansas City- and Dallas-built a/c, Interior Green was used from the start.

 

 

North American P-51B's, C's, D's and their derivatives used interior green in the cockpit from the start in 1943. No Pine Green/Dull Dark Green/Bronze Green color (seat being the exception) was ever used in the cockpits of the Merlin engined Mustangs and it's entirely plausible that it was not used in the early Allison engined Mustangs either.

Edited by TimC

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Tim

Here is a link to the IPMS Stockholm site for Interior calls for all major USAAF and USN aircraft in WWII. Ready good info

http://www.ipmsstock..._colours_us.htm

 

Peter

 

Peter--

 

Many thanks--I had that one bookmarked and agree that it is very helpful, particularly in helping me match things up to Model Master (what I tend to use the most, apart from Humbrol).

 

Cheers,

 

Tim W.

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Guest Peterpools

Tim

I've been quickly coming back to enamels from the land of 'grainy' acrylics. I did find the documentation very useful and it helped answered a lot of questions for me. Of course, there are quite a few notations, that as the war progressed, factories used what was on hand or what they could find and modified the accordingly.

Glad I was able to help out.

Peter

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