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Bruce

Roger Lochor's F-4 info needed

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anyone know if there are any profiles (decals in 1/32) of either the a/c he got his second mig in or the one he was shot down in, exist?

 

Bruce

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Bruce,

 

According to the Kill List in USAF F-4 and F-105 MiG Killers:

Maj. Roger A. Lodge and Capt. Roger C. Locher were flying F-4D 65-784 for three different kills all Mig 21's.

First was on 21 Feb 72 next 8 May 72 last on 10 May 72. They were shot down on 10 May mission by a Mig 19.

Maj. Lodge was killed and Capt. Locher spent 23 days evading capture before being rescued.

 

They are two photos of aircraft one is shot at Misawa AB, Japan in April 71 and the other in Jan 72 at Udorn RTAFB.

The aircraft appears to have no "unique" marking and carries standard aircraft # markings and tail code "UD".

Tail code would have changed to "OY" sometime early in 72 so aircraft likely had OY tail code at least for the 2nd and 3rd kill.

 

Hope this helps.

Barry

Edited by Barry

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Bruce,

 

According to the Kill List in USAF F-4 and F-105 MiG Killers:

Maj. Roger A. Lodge and Capt. Roger C. Locher were flying F-4D 65-784 for three different kills all Mig 21's.

First was on 21 Feb 72 next 8 May 72 last on 10 May 72. They were shot down on 10 May mission by a Mig 19.

Maj. Lodge was killed and Capt. Locher spent 23 days evading capture before being rescued.

 

They are two photos of aircraft one is shot at Misawa AB, Japan in April 71 and the other in Jan 72 at Udorn RTAFB.

The aircraft appears to have no "unique" marking and carries standard aircraft # markings and tail code "UD".

Tail code would have changed to "OY" sometime early in 72 so aircraft likely had OY tail code at least for the 2nd and 3rd kill.

 

Hope this helps.

Barry

thanks Barry, can you shoot me a copy of the later photo at my email address?

 

Bruce

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thanks Barry, can you shoot me a copy of the later photo at my email address?

 

Bruce

 

Headed your way.

 

Barry

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Headed your way.

 

Barry

 

Barry, I'd like one too.

 

Bruce,

 

I researched 784 for a 1/48 model in the Late 90’s. My research lead me to aviation artist extraordinaire Harley Copic, who did a painting for the Lodge Family of the aircraft. I went to his house in Lavonia Michigan and spent a lovely afternoon with him. He had photos of F-4’s (some VERY interesting ones at that) he had taken on the ramp when he was there for linebacker 1 in 1972. No photo of 784 since it was lost on May 10th. He also had an audio recording of their first kill in February; if memory serves me right it was a rather long engagement (4+minutes) and at night! The MIG was trying to hit a cell of B-52’s and the aircraft was Combat Tree equipped so; they chased the MIG and shot it down before it got to the cell. These correspondences lead me to the man himself, Rodger Locher about the aircraft. I spoke with him about the aircraft and that day in May. He told me he would dig up his notes & get back to me. I received a nice Christmas card and a four page letter describing in detail what he remembered about 784. I lost the let in my last move, but the details have always been buried in my memory. I’ll try to summarize:

 

1. 65-784 was a Combat Tree equipped F-4D, so remember to have the red self-destruct square on the left intake.

 

2. The Aircraft was assigned to 1st LT. John Markle, Pilot and 1st LT. Steve Eaves WSO. The aircraft received the OY tail code, had the number 784 in white on a green rectangle on the nose gear door and green fin flash noting the 555th TFS. The names were in white letters on a green canopy rail. If you look closely at the photo of 784 in “One Day in a Long War” you’ll catch the end of Markel’s name on the canopy rail. The photo was taken sometime in late Feb. /early March after Lodge & Locher’s first kill. Roger noted that the first kill was painted on the splinter plate with a small “commie” red star (small star with droopy shoulders) because (paraphrasing) “the toads at the 13th had the proper sized star”. At some time between the first and second kill, the names on the rail changed to Lodge & Locher as they pulled rank commandeering the aircraft.

 

3. Being Combat Tree Equipped, 784 was primarily an air-to-air airframe. For all three of Bob (His name was Robert, not Roger as listed in USAF F-4 and F-105 MiG Killers) & Roger’s Kills; the aircraft was configured with three AIM-7E Sparrows, Three AIM-4D Falcons, a QRC 335 Long ECM Pod in the left front sparrow well and a QRC 335 short ECM Pod.

 

4. When they were shot down there were repeated calls to Bob about the MiG 19 on his tail & he replied “Oyster One Padlocked” as they were about to get their second MiG of the day and their fourth of the war.

 

5. Once Bob & Roger were fatally hit, 65-784 was in a flat spin, the flames had reached close to the rear canopy Roger calmly told Bob “I have to get out”. Bob calmly looked over his right shoulder and replied “then why don’t you get out”. Roger ejected and Bob (who had worked intel and was afraid his knowledge would be compromised should he become a POW) road the aircraft in. As fate would have it, Roger was rescued and Bob may never have become a POW.

 

That was the information that was shared to me and I hope it helps with your project. Now where are those 1/32nd Falcons and ECM Pods?

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Barry, I'd like one too.

 

Bruce,

 

I researched 784 for a 1/48 model in the Late 90’s. My research lead me to aviation artist extraordinaire Harley Copic, who did a painting for the Lodge Family of the aircraft. I went to his house in Lavonia Michigan and spent a lovely afternoon with him. He had photos of F-4’s (some VERY interesting ones at that) he had taken on the ramp when he was there for linebacker 1 in 1972. No photo of 784 since it was lost on May 10th. He also had an audio recording of their first kill in February; if memory serves me right it was a rather long engagement (4+minutes) and at night! The MIG was trying to hit a cell of B-52’s and the aircraft was Combat Tree equipped so; they chased the MIG and shot it down before it got to the cell. These correspondences lead me to the man himself, Rodger Locher about the aircraft. I spoke with him about the aircraft and that day in May. He told me he would dig up his notes & get back to me. I received a nice Christmas card and a four page letter describing in detail what he remembered about 784. I lost the let in my last move, but the details have always been buried in my memory. I’ll try to summarize:

 

1. 65-784 was a Combat Tree equipped F-4D, so remember to have the red self-destruct square on the left intake.

 

2. The Aircraft was assigned to 1st LT. John Markle, Pilot and 1st LT. Steve Eaves WSO. The aircraft received the OY tail code, had the number 784 in white on a green rectangle on the nose gear door and green fin flash noting the 555th TFS. The names were in white letters on a green canopy rail. If you look closely at the photo of 784 in “One Day in a Long War” you’ll catch the end of Markel’s name on the canopy rail. The photo was taken sometime in late Feb. /early March after Lodge & Locher’s first kill. Roger noted that the first kill was painted on the splinter plate with a small “commie” red star (small star with droopy shoulders) because (paraphrasing) “the toads at the 13th had the proper sized star”. At some time between the first and second kill, the names on the rail changed to Lodge & Locher as they pulled rank commandeering the aircraft.

 

3. Being Combat Tree Equipped, 784 was primarily an air-to-air airframe. For all three of Bob (His name was Robert, not Roger as listed in USAF F-4 and F-105 MiG Killers) & Roger’s Kills; the aircraft was configured with three AIM-7E Sparrows, Three AIM-4D Falcons, a QRC 335 Long ECM Pod in the left front sparrow well and a QRC 335 short ECM Pod.

 

4. When they were shot down there were repeated calls to Bob about the MiG 19 on his tail & he replied “Oyster One Padlocked” as they were about to get their second MiG of the day and their fourth of the war.

 

5. Once Bob & Roger were fatally hit, 65-784 was in a flat spin, the flames had reached close to the rear canopy Roger calmly told Bob “I have to get out”. Bob calmly looked over his right shoulder and replied “then why don’t you get out”. Roger ejected and Bob (who had worked intel and was afraid his knowledge would be compromised should he become a POW) road the aircraft in. As fate would have it, Roger was rescued and Bob may never have become a POW.

 

That was the information that was shared to me and I hope it helps with your project. Now where are those 1/32nd Falcons and ECM Pods?

 

 

thanks for the info, good story

 

Bruce

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Barry, I'd like one too.

 

Bruce,

 

I researched 784 for a 1/48 model in the Late 90’s. My research lead me to aviation artist extraordinaire Harley Copic, who did a painting for the Lodge Family of the aircraft. I went to his house in Lavonia Michigan and spent a lovely afternoon with him. He had photos of F-4’s (some VERY interesting ones at that) he had taken on the ramp when he was there for linebacker 1 in 1972. No photo of 784 since it was lost on May 10th. He also had an audio recording of their first kill in February; if memory serves me right it was a rather long engagement (4+minutes) and at night! The MIG was trying to hit a cell of B-52’s and the aircraft was Combat Tree equipped so; they chased the MIG and shot it down before it got to the cell. These correspondences lead me to the man himself, Rodger Locher about the aircraft. I spoke with him about the aircraft and that day in May. He told me he would dig up his notes & get back to me. I received a nice Christmas card and a four page letter describing in detail what he remembered about 784. I lost the let in my last move, but the details have always been buried in my memory. I’ll try to summarize:

 

1. 65-784 was a Combat Tree equipped F-4D, so remember to have the red self-destruct square on the left intake.

 

2. The Aircraft was assigned to 1st LT. John Markle, Pilot and 1st LT. Steve Eaves WSO. The aircraft received the OY tail code, had the number 784 in white on a green rectangle on the nose gear door and green fin flash noting the 555th TFS. The names were in white letters on a green canopy rail. If you look closely at the photo of 784 in “One Day in a Long War” you’ll catch the end of Markel’s name on the canopy rail. The photo was taken sometime in late Feb. /early March after Lodge & Locher’s first kill. Roger noted that the first kill was painted on the splinter plate with a small “commie” red star (small star with droopy shoulders) because (paraphrasing) “the toads at the 13th had the proper sized star”. At some time between the first and second kill, the names on the rail changed to Lodge & Locher as they pulled rank commandeering the aircraft.

 

3. Being Combat Tree Equipped, 784 was primarily an air-to-air airframe. For all three of Bob (His name was Robert, not Roger as listed in USAF F-4 and F-105 MiG Killers) & Roger’s Kills; the aircraft was configured with three AIM-7E Sparrows, Three AIM-4D Falcons, a QRC 335 Long ECM Pod in the left front sparrow well and a QRC 335 short ECM Pod.

 

4. When they were shot down there were repeated calls to Bob about the MiG 19 on his tail & he replied “Oyster One Padlocked” as they were about to get their second MiG of the day and their fourth of the war.

 

5. Once Bob & Roger were fatally hit, 65-784 was in a flat spin, the flames had reached close to the rear canopy Roger calmly told Bob “I have to get out”. Bob calmly looked over his right shoulder and replied “then why don’t you get out”. Roger ejected and Bob (who had worked intel and was afraid his knowledge would be compromised should he become a POW) road the aircraft in. As fate would have it, Roger was rescued and Bob may never have become a POW.

 

That was the information that was shared to me and I hope it helps with your project. Now where are those 1/32nd Falcons and ECM Pods?

 

 

thanks for the info, good story

 

Bruce

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Barry, I'd like one too.

 

Thanks for the great story.

PM me your email address and I'll send you the pictures.

I too would like to see AIM-4's and some later ECM pod versions in 1/32.

 

Barry

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