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big matt

Robin Olds Flamingo 01

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Thanks Barry!

 

That is good info on the ecm pod turbine. I need to pop it off and fix her up. I might keep the camo on it but will decide this weekend.

 

Based on your data, I am weathering up the jet now. Trying to visualize the walkways you described and where your hands and feet would go. How much did the fuel affect the paint around the aerial refueling door? Anyway, the matte coat is on and the tape is off the windscreen and it looks pretty cool. She just might be a messy Phantom. Oh yes, I almost forgot to do the windscreen front green tint. It's on there now.

 

Go Wolfpack!

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Guest Peterpools

Matt

Love the airbrush work and finish.

:speak_cool:

Peter

:popcorn:

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Thanks Barry!

 

That is good info on the ecm pod turbine. I need to pop it off and fix her up. I might keep the camo on it but will decide this weekend.

 

Based on your data, I am weathering up the jet now. Trying to visualize the walkways you described and where your hands and feet would go. How much did the fuel affect the paint around the aerial refueling door? Anyway, the matte coat is on and the tape is off the windscreen and it looks pretty cool. She just might be a messy Phantom. Oh yes, I almost forgot to do the windscreen front green tint. It's on there now.

 

Go Wolfpack!

Matt

 

The fuel had very little effect on the paint around the aerial refueling door. The end of the boom from the tanker is another story.

Many aircraft had scars down to bare metal. Many were up to a foot or more long on some jets. They were caused when the boom probe was drug along the panel into the recepital. Can't blame the crews they were mentally and phycially drained by the time there were doing their homeward refueling. You could see where the fuel spray had evaporated.

 

Barry

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Cool. That's what I needed to know. I found that I can make nice boot scuffs with a Prismacolor "warm gray" pencil. I looked at the Melampy book in the fuselage top section for guidance. Kinda like heel marks on my kitchen floor :innocent:

 

Even though 668 looked pretty clean from the side, I can only imagine what it looked like from the top. Now I need to figure out what those fuel stains should be made with...

 

I will try to post later. Just want to make sure I am going in the right direction.

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In my big Phantom stash I have one more USAF short nose left for a D bird and was thinking about doing a Compass scheme. However after seeing the paint on this one I'm starting to go with a wrap around SEA scheme that the GAANG had for a short time.

 

And to go along with the warm gray pencil I have found that a little bit of artist chalks in the color of the local dirt lightly scrubbed into a flat finish in walkway areas adds a bit of tone to the model.

 

Great looking model.

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Thanks for the tip Joe. I managed to work with some pastels and a smudging stump too. No dirt though, my yard is mostly sand. The wrap around SEA paint jobs are cool!

 

Here is a bit of the weathering. I was trying to go for a hard used but not abused look based on Barry's suggestions. Not sure but most of it is reversible water based pencils and such.

 

287d4e6f.jpg

 

Apparently the preferred mounting technique involved climbing up the wing tank and walking along the wing and then climbing up the fuselage to the cockpit or tail.

 

37819136.jpg

 

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Looks like the fuel drogue missed a couple times...

 

058529f4.jpg

 

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I have only done the one side so if I am close let me know. I have not found a lot of pics of these areas on Vietnam era jets so word of mouth gathered by one who was not there is the best I can do. Thanks for the help guys!

 

Matt

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Matt, I'm liking this alot! Love the weathering. I must try this on my builds.....Harv :speak_cool:

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Hi Matt,

 

It looks awesome!

The area infront of the refueling door is as I remember it. :speak_cool:

Though the same areas on the jets starboard side got used it was not nearly like the port side.

If we had to go up to the offices after engine start then the left engine would be shut down if we had to work in the front cockpit. If issue was in aft and most were then engines would remain running and we would climb onto wing tank then left intake forward to aft cockpit. The vents on top on the intakes especially on the left side should show quite a bit wear along with the skin in that area.

 

Photos show how worn these areas became and you can see why; this is in addition to maintenance!

 

scan0038AB.jpg

 

scan0037AB.jpg

 

Great Work!

Barry

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Love the level of weathering, I am a relatively recent convert to the silver pencil. :goodjob:

 

You don't see this type of weathering on the Navy jets. Am I correct in assuming the salt air would quickly degrade the metal, and so maintenance is constantly doing patch jobs to not have any bare metal? Or was the paint more hard wearing?

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Thanks for looking in Harv and Brian, I am having fun on this thing now but there is still a looooong way to go. Lots of fiddly bits.

 

Barry, thanks for the info on the types of weathering. It is fun to imagine where you would put your hands and what that would do to the paint. The top pic is the one I was working from. I think that is a "Spook" in the top part of the inlet. I really wanted to do that to mine but I am probably using fod covers because my inlets were assembled when I got the kit and I could not fix the gap.

 

I spent a little time this afternoon in my 100 deg F shop working with pastels and pencils. The big beast is starting to look better in the critical corner of your eye glance test. <_<

 

Pics tomorrow. I was sweating too much and did not want to mess anything up. I have a color pic of 680 in formation flying low level that inspired this build and that look is what I am shooting for, mean and nasty.

 

Gotta go, it's beer call! :beer4:

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Looks good to me. Much like the way I did a 1/48 Phantom that I did a million years ago. More knowledge and skill now too.

 

I should have said use a pastel chalk that is the same color as the dirt in the theater of use.

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I can't tell from my screen so forgive me if I'm stating the obvious....

 

These birds all shipped in the Navy Gloss Gull Gray paint and the SEA scheme was applied over that. It might be a cool touch if some of your (really awesome!) weathering reflected that color underneath...

 

Just a thought I had when I saw those pics from the war.

 

Looks like you're almost finished! Very inspirational work!! :party0023:

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Guest Peterpools

Matt

Weathering is spot on: Used but not Abused. The last few photos just add to the accuracy.Perfect!

 

Peter

Edited by Peterpools

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Macbain, you are right. Navy planes got a bit more care in the paint department from what I can tell. I have not studied Navy Phantoms but have looked at Skyhawks from the same era and they are in better shape with the chipping and bare metal.

 

Got it Joe, I wonder what the dirt in Thailand was like???

 

Yo Dave! Thanks for checking in and I agree about the gray. I did use a gray pencil as well as silver. It is just about impossible to tell them apart in the pics. I did throw in a couple panels in the Navy Gray though... :evil_laugh:

 

Thanks Peter! The thing still has to fly so I figured "less is more".

 

Ok, jury is out on the FOD gaurds. Not sure if they are right for the period or not. They are what I had though. If not, the inlets need some paint and don't look too close for the gap.

 

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Overall filthiness

 

36aa4b2e.jpg

 

Nitrogen fill gauge

 

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Dirty wing

 

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Boot prints and such

 

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Dirty back

 

7af1c937.jpg

 

Ok, I am just about done with this thing. No more weathering I think. Just a few tidbits and the other bang seat and I am home free.

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