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EPinniger

Curtiss BF2C-1 Hawk

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Thanks, EP! The color is appreciated. I'm adding a little more to mine, but only for the 'pit, and engine. Cockpit pics would be huge. I'll be doing A/C # 13.

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The basic airframe is now assembled:

 

2.jpg

 

3.jpg

 

engine4.jpg

Closeup of the engine.

 

cockpit6.jpg

View of the cockpit. The photo's a bit dark but this is about the best I can get without using the camera flash!

 

One question: Could anyone advise me what the exact shade of the fuselage paint should be for 1930s USN aircraft? (the metal areas, that is; the fabric-covered areas are painted silver). It seems to be a very light grey, possibly with a very slight brownish/yellowish tinge. So far I've painted these areas with Revell Light Grey (even if not the right colour, it's a good undercoat) which looks, to my eye, slightly but still noticeably too dark and too bluish in tone. (I'll take some photos tomorrow)

 

 

Thanks, EP! The color is appreciated. I'm adding a little more to mine, but only for the 'pit, and engine. Cockpit pics would be huge. I'll be doing A/C # 13.

 

What are you adding to the cockpit and engine? I thought of adding a bit more to mine (open rudder pedals, for example) but decided against it as it won't be too visible once the canopy is in place. The engine could probably do with more work, but I don't have any detailed reference photos.

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EP, I added the framing to the port side, made a seat from beer can alum, and figured that some bits should go on the port side(tailhook, wheels up/down, throttle) while a mapcase, and some other goo-gaws on the stbd side. Mix in some wire, and seat belts- that'll do. I'll wire the engine,and add some guages, as well. Aside from planning the rigging wires, it's pretty straightforward.

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Very fast build,great work too.As for the paint I'd go with light gray with a touch of silver.Something along the line of Pfalz Silvergrau.That's what I used on my Momogram F3.Hope his helps.

Gregory Jouette

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I've now painted the main airframe parts (no green tail + red stripe yet, this will wait until assembly is finished) and the underside of the upper wing. (Note that although I've started painting, the model is still very far from completion. I find with biplanes it's a good idea to paint the fuselage + lower wing before adding the upper wing, especially since I brush paint, which is difficult in hard to reach areas. Since I'd painted half the fuselage already, I thought I may as well paint the whole thing to see what it looked like)

 

4.jpg

 

The paint scheme is rather counter-intuitive as all the metal areas are painted light grey and the fabric-covered areas are painted silver! The silver-painted fabric is Revell Aluminium and the few unpainted metal areas (e.g undercarriage bay) are Revell Silver; the grey is Revell Light Grey (Hellgrau).

 

5.jpg

 

The paint revealed some nasty "step" seam lines around the front of the cockpit, which you can probably see in the photos, I've now sanded these down as best I can! You also might notice that one of the scratchbuilt trim tabs (the kit ones have a seam running right down their middle, so it was easier to replace them with a bit of Evergreen strip cut to shape) broke off when sanding, this will be replaced once the upper wing is glued in place.

 

6.jpg

 

What does everyone think of the shade of grey I used? Correct (more or less) or not? If it's not right, repainting it won't be a huge problem, it needs retouching in some areas anyway now I've sanded down the aforementioned seam lines, and light grey is a good undercoat.

 

Although it looks like I'm making good progress, there is still a lot of work to do, both painting and modelling! Next job is to fit + paint the engine exhausts and cockpit gunsight, then add the cowling, once this is done the upper wing can be attached.

 

Regarding the cockpit detail, I probably should have put more work into this, it's actually more visible on the completed model than I though (in fact, sanding off + scratchbuilding all the existing sidewall detail might have been worthwhile; my scratchbuilt fuselage structure looks a lot better than the moulded one on the opposite sidewall). But I wanted this to be a fairly straightforward build to get me back into 1/32 aircraft modelling - this is my first 1/32 build since the Norwegian Tiger Moth I built nearly a year ago.

 

boeingf4.jpg

 

Finally, "here's one I made earlier", the Hasegawa Boeing F4, which I built a few years ago. My modelling + painting skills have improved a bit since then, but it's still not a bad model. Again, I'm not sure if this has the right fuselage colour (can't remember which paint it was, I think it was a Humbrol enamel - I've since switched to acrylics)

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EP, looks good so far. Your grey looks OK, just needs to be a satin or very slight glossy sheen, you may want to spray the entire thing when complete, with a rattle can. How are you going to rig this? I attached fishing line, and glued up the inside attachments points. Thanks again for the pics you sent.

dcheers,Mike

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i agree with mike, and it just goes to show what can be done with a brush. lovely so far---i never did get around to doing any of these kits----but remember they were highly rated in there day.

 

cheers,

dave.

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Brush painting isn't as hard as it appears if you use acrylics - acrylic paints "flatten" and lose a lot of their volume when they dry (and they usually dry very quickly) so you don't get noticeable brush marks, as you almost inevitably do when brushing with enamels. The biggest problem is bits of sanding dust, plastic shavings and dried paint flakes marring the paint surface. Since my new workshop has a seperate painting area, this has solved the first two problems, the third can be kept in check (to some extent!) by cleaning dried paint from the pots regularly.

 

The grey does have a slight sheen to it, though it isn't too visible in the photos - I normally polish the paint on aircraft models using a soft polishing cloth, this gives a more subtle + realistic finish than varnish IMHO. I still haven't found a good flat (all of them seem to be semi-gloss or satin, even if labelled "flat" or "matt") brushable acrylic varnish.

 

To rig 1/32 aircraft, I normally use very fine stainless steel guitar wire. This gives about the right look, although it doesn't have an airfoil cross-section! Most importantly, it has a lot of rigidity, it doesn't need to be under tension to stay straight.

 

Hopefully I should have some more photos tomorrow!

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I'm gonna jump in here to question the color callouts in the Hasegawa BF2C-1 kit.

 

I realize that prevailing USN practice in the early 1930s was the Light Gray/Aluminum Dope scheme. But I believe by the time the BF2Cs entered service, both fabric and metal surfaces were being painted Aluminum. For example, check the pics under BF2C-1 at: http://www.oldairplanepictures.com/navyfighter.htm

 

Your workmanship is terrific! I hope my BF2C looks as good when I get around to it. You just might want to further research the color scheme if you haven't yet applied decals.

 

My .02 zlotys. Anyone have any different info?

 

:P Les (Friendly Airplane Asylum flack)

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Progress has been fairly slow over the last few days, but I've still managed to get some work done:

 

engine5.jpg

 

engine6.jpg

 

Exhaust pipes added to the engine. The fit with the cylinders is fairly poor, but will be hidden under the cowling on the finished model. The pipes were first painted matt black, then drybrushed with graphite paint, followed by dark reddish-brown, and finally patches of rusty brown.

 

engine7.jpg

 

Cowling added to the engine. This is moulded in two halves - masking tape is invaluable for clamping assemblies like this together without distortion whilst gluing! It's undercoated grey, the finished item will be red.

 

7.jpg

 

8.jpg

 

9.jpg

 

With the upper wing in place, the model is now a biplane at last! The fit of the struts + wing is very neat with no trimming, and minimal clamping, needed - a change from most biplane models (in various scales) I've built in the past.

The upper side of the top wing hasn't been undercoated/painted yet.

 

I'm gonna jump in here to question the color callouts in the Hasegawa BF2C-1 kit.

 

I realize that prevailing USN practice in the early 1930s was the Light Gray/Aluminum Dope scheme. But I believe by the time the BF2Cs entered service, both fabric and metal surfaces were being painted Aluminum. For example, check the pics under BF2C-1 at: http://www.oldairplanepictures.com/navyfighter.htm

 

Many of the contemporary photos (mostly in an old magazine article) I have of the BF2C-1 clearly show the fuselage partly painted and partly metallic in appearance - here's an example, this has the same scheme + unit markings as the Hasegawa kit:

photo.jpg

 

I have some other photos where the metal areas of the fuselage have a metallic appearance, so you're probably right that they were painted overall Aluminium later, but it looks like they certainly had the light grey/aluminium dope scheme for some of their life.

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