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keith in the uk

What price the old Revells? am i doomed to poverty?

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What do i do guys? i like most guys here have a stash of Revell kits which i have collected over the years

and one by one have been replaced by new tools from Trumpeter , Hasagawa etc .

Is it worth keeping these kits any more? or do i put them on E Bay with all the other kits nobody wants ( Oh the inhumanity )

or do i bite my lip and sell em off real cheap at the car boot sale.

For anyone interested heres what i have :-

 

P47 Bubble top and Razorback.

P51B Mustang

F3F Wildcat

Seafire

Spitfire Mk1

P38 Lightning

JU87 Stuka

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What do i do guys? i like most guys here have a stash of Revell kits which i have collected over the years

and one by one have been replaced by new tools from Trumpeter , Hasagawa etc .

Is it worth keeping these kits any more? or do i put them on E Bay with all the other kits nobody wants ( Oh the inhumanity )

or do i bite my lip and sell em off real cheap at the car boot sale.

For anyone interested heres what i have :-

 

P47 Bubble top and Razorback.

P51B Mustang

F3F Wildcat

Seafire

Spitfire Mk1

P38 Lightning

JU87 Stuka

 

I guess it would depend on if you plan on replacing them with their new tool Hasegawa/Trumpeter counterparts.

 

If you're not then I'd keep them and build them. They're still viable kits; they just need more effort to be competitive with the newer tooled stuff.

 

If you plan on replacing then you could do several things:

 

1. give them to a kid you know to get them started in the hobby

 

2. build them OOB just for the fun of it and not worry about the details (can be very therapeutic)

 

3. keep them and hope that some day (maybe 50 years from now) they become worth something again to collectors

 

4. sell them for pennies on the dollar and use the money to buy 1 newer tooled kit

 

It's really up to you and what you want out of them. I gave all my old Revell kits to my son to build (he's 9 now). He can learn on them (with my help). If he screws up, so what. It wouldn't be as bad as if he messed up a $75 kit plus we have fun at the same time. Also, he can play with them when he's done. If they break during play who cares?

 

Jeff

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All the kits you listed are quite buildable. You can cut your teeth in scratch building, detailing and even painting and weathering on them. I have all those kits in my stash and dont plan on selling them off. Many guys on this forum have proven that with a little work, these kits can turn out as nice or even better than some of the more recent releases. Here is a couple of pictures taken at last years Gryffon Expo. It's the old Revell Mig-21 built by a friend of mine. When you look at the built model, it looks better that the Trum offering.

s14.jpg

f18.jpg

This just goes to show you what can be done. Cheers.

 

Francis

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I want your P-47s. PM me if you want to sell them, I'm planning on stashing them until my son is old enough to build, then they will be his "training squadron" :)

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Hello Keith,

By all means build those old Revell kits for the Following reasons.One: They may be old and maybe alittle dated,but they're still good kits. Two: They give you a chance to do some updated (Scratchbuilding). Three: You can master some very useful skills building the old birds. Four:Revell"s 1/32 scale kits when well built ,detailed, corrected,and painted using all the modern tools,techniques,and after market detail sets.They look every bit as good as the new kits IMO.Five: Build it just for joy of building straight from the box.Six: Use as training tools then go for that new Trumpy or Hasagawa kit.Seven: Hey they're already paid for why not go ahead and build them. These suggestion are offered by a modeler who has been loving this hobby for well over 40 years now,and still builds the old Revell kit.

Regards,

Gregory Jouette

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I have had most in my stash at one time or another BUT

 

I like the original releases when the covers were painted by Jack Lynnewood at Revell in the late 1960's and early 1970's (when I was a kid)

 

The artwork is fantastic! Just look at the painting of the Revell Bong's P-38 "Marge" with the Oscar on it's tail, bullet holes, and one prop feathered - too cool.

 

If ONLY to collect for the art is good enough reason!

 

Stash piles start with the buy 2 (buy one and keep and build one)

 

Jon

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... I like the original releases when the covers were painted by Jack Lynnewood at Revell in the late 1960's and early 1970's (when I was a kid)

 

The artwork is fantastic! Just look at the painting of the Revell Bong's P-38 "Marge" with the Oscar on it's tail, bullet holes, and one prop feathered - too cool.

 

If ONLY to collect for the art is good enough reason!

 

Stash piles start with the buy 2 (buy one and keep and build one)

 

Jon

 

That's the reason I've been collecting them over the past few years! :) It feels like going back to when I was a kid and buit them over the week end just to play with my friends. Actually what got me started in 32 scale was an article in Scale Aircraft modeller (if my memory works correctly), some guy had built the Corsair all opened up. The article offered some detail photos of the inside and I actually tried to do the same but without his success. I remember reading he won best of show that year at the Nats. Memories... Sorry to highjack the thread.

 

Francis

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I too have a pile of older kits from Revell and even early Hasegawa. I build for me, no one else, so when it looks good to me, I'm satisfied. The Revell kits are fun to build and still impressive. Despite me saying I build for me, my 60s vintage Spitfire draws ooh and ahhs from my fellow co-workers. It sits on my desk. About the only kit I would never touch again is the F-4J and the 70s vintage F-4E. Revell's newer Phantoms are very nice, especially for the money.

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P47 Bubble top and Razorback. - $20Au but as low as $10

P51B Mustang - $20

F3F Wildcat - $20

Seafire - harder to find...now new on shelves of LHS

Spitfire Mk1 - 5-$10...ooodles of them on Ebay

P38 Lightning - $20 ( Sqn just had a sale on them NIB for $19

JU87 Stuka - rarer but can still get new at the LHS

 

Keith, from that list mate none of them look like investment material unless they have the fancy box art that can attract collectors like John Payne. The prices I put up there are for what I used to see them go on Ebay for, or for what I've bought some of them 'new' from my LHS or at a show.

 

The newer release kits seem much easier to assemble. Modellers seem to expect this as the norm. Perhaps the Revell kits represent a modelling challenge/change of pace that is every bit worth what you paid but not worth what you'd get for them if you sold them off. I like some of the other sentiments...as a give away, as a slammer, a test bed for products or technique changes.

 

Keep em I reckon...I'm keeping all mine.

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I tend to agree with Matty - whenever I get the chance at shows I will pick up one or two of these older kits because they appeal to my sense of nostalgia and they present a bit of a challenge and a chance to experiment with new techniques.

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my first kits after comming back to the hobby (allthough it was because of the trumpy F-105G) were revell: an F-16 (finished), the tomcat and F-15D (see threads) and a F-4E (80% finished). since then i built up a lttle stash from tamiya, academy and trumpeter and piled up a lot of aftermarket, but i´m just scared to start one of them (but eventually will) for being afraid to screw those expensive kits. on the other hand, i dont think one of these kits needs as much work as the F-14B conversion :o quietly some more revell kits sneaked up: another F-16 (to make in a DS NY ANG bird with the leftover gunpod from the F-15D), two F-4s (DS RF-4 and and E for a weasel conversion) as well as an F-117 :o :huh: :angry: ;) :) :angry: :blink: :huh: :o :o :blink:

just shows they have thier place, just build them, its rewarding.

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Like many others have said, I'd keep 'em too. I'm finding that I'm learning a lot more from struggling with these old kits than I ever would building their modern replacements. I also find them useful for (somewhat) fearlessly trying out new, potentially disastrous techniques. My current Revell Zero build is my scratchbuilding/detailing testbed.

 

Too bad you're not in Australia - I'd buy a few off you!

 

Kev

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I'm tending to agree with the other guys here, hang on to them.

 

Although I've certainly accumulated a few Revell kits, (and built a few) there are so many excellent models out there now that it's hard to justify building any more.

 

With the odd exception, these kits are now worth very little.

I'm sure that if you really want to get rid of them, there are lots of guys here who would be more than happy to take them off your hands... me included. ( First dibbs on the Mk I Spit!)

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theres no replacement for the revell stuka-remember the hasegawa one is a different aircraft so hold on to that at least

Don't forget about the 21stC kit. It doesn't look bad.

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