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Super Hornets Just Got a Big Stick - AIM-174B


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6 hours ago, Pete Fleischmann said:

This might actually fulfill the purpose that the AIM-54 never lived up to-

 

P

 

It did in the Iran-Iraq war. 

Its shelf life wasn't great.

Oh for battery technology.

 

Tony

 

 

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The Phoenix gave a quantum leap capacity in interception...on paper. However technology of that time was still not the most reliable because of the systems complexity. Maturity generally asks for time. Look at the initial use of the first versions of the Sidewinder and Sparrow. They were far simpler but we're not great either. It was already "fire and forget" but for the missile, not the pilot! ;-)

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7 hours ago, thierry laurent said:

The Phoenix gave a quantum leap capacity in interception...on paper. However technology of that time was still not the most reliable because of the systems complexity. Maturity generally asks for time. Look at the initial use of the first versions of the Sidewinder and Sparrow. They were far simpler but we're not great either. It was already "fire and forget" but for the missile, not the pilot! ;-)

It bears remembering that the Phoenix had a really specific mission - to target big. unmaneuverable Bears, Badgers and Backfires or their equally unmaneuverable, school bus sized anti-ship missiles as far as possible from the carrier.   Using tech from the late 60's, it's a bit harsh judge it by today's standards.    Who knows how those things would have worked in real life, had WW3 started.   I think this new SM-6 spin-off has a completely different mission.     

 

Lot of new stuff in the works, the AIM-260 is making it's way through the development process (in the black world).   It seems to be slated as a longer-range replacement for the AMRAM and I believe the AF is also working on yet another long range AAM as well.   

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Hi John. I'm well aware of the 60s-70s standards and obviously one should always consider the contemporary capabilities of the specific era. However I see no issue in comparing products of different eras. This simply shows evolution and the way to maturity. It is a hard fact all initial generations of AAM had a very limited use envelope and a quite debatable efficiency. No surprise pilots in Vietnam prayed to have planes with guns! And the limitations were either similar or even worse when you consider the 'advanced' weapons produced by the USSR. Nonetheless, as Tony mentioned, the Phoenix could be used with some results and even against smaller targets. The fact is technology evolved so quickly during the sixties systems became very complex before the arrival of the digital revolution. And as one of my university teachers used to say fragility is one natural consequence of complexity...:rolleyes:

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Navy seems awful excited about publicizing this weapon all of a sudden.    Taken onboard USS Vinson    Nice shot that illustrates how big this thing is compared to the AIM-120.   Now we just need the aftermarket peeps to offer up this weapon and the IRST / external tank combo and one will truly be able to equip your 32nd Superhornet with a kick-ass anti-air loadout. 

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