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Norm In Toronto

LSP_Members
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About Norm In Toronto

  • Rank
    LSP Junkie
  • Birthday 05/18/1944

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Unionville Ontario Canada (just north of Toronto)
  1. There's an umbilical connection on the top of the left thigh about half way between the knee and waist. All necessary connections (air, communications links and various sensor terminals) are included in one, flat "plug" (appears to be about 3 - 4 inches in size). Modern technology
  2. Thanks Kev - makes sense from a manufacturing standpoint, but may limit the use of machined aluminum or resin connectors like those used in the auto modelling area.
  3. Question to those who have had "hands-on" with these items: Are they solid or are they "hose" (hollow tube) like? It appears from the data on the insert card that other diameters are either available or are planned - any further info? Norm.
  4. Am I misreading Halberd's material? It looks to me that the black "tire" piece is SOFT RESIN, - NOT VINYL. Would this not eliminate any possibility of the dreaded "melt down" effect and make weathering much more effective? I'm also intrigued with the process of "adjusting the tire pressure" (adjusting the drawdown) from fully inflated to completely flat. Would love to have additional information on how this is accomplished. Norm.
  5. Kevin, you don't mention it, but it appears that there are no holes provided at the ends in which the wire would be inserted - is this correct? Drilling them would be a challenge - but, hey, that's modelling ain't it?
  6. Interesting. Hope all you folks "south" of the border don't feel too upset about the removal of your nation from the map
  7. Would "North America" not include the U.S.?
  8. Gerhard, you can take a virtual tour of the shop on their site: http://www.wheelswingshobbies.com/ Click on the "virtual tour" label on the left side of the home page, then use your mouse to direct your view left, right, up, down, and move the arrow ahead and click to move around. Don't forget to go "downstairs". Norm.
  9. Nice Spit there Peter - but what it really needs is "metal foil" finish. All the best in the New Year! Norm.
  10. Looks like the documentary was lost more thoroughly than the original aircraft. Too bad Google Earth can't find the video like it can the 70 year old wreck (9°11'51.78"S Long 148°39'43.00"E) Apparently some mysteries are destined to remain unsolved. Norm.
  11. Sorry Peter, but I counted the number of rivets on the wheel well panel - and I think you may be short one! Just kidding, of course - outstanding work my friend. BTW, I have to say how impressed I was in receiving my order from Airscale in only 5 days!! All the way from Merry Ol' England to remote Barrie Ontario. And this during the Christmas rush for deliveries - Thanks also to the Royal Mail and good ol' Canada Post. It's comforting to see the attention to detail you exhibit in your model masterpieces is reflected in the operation of your company. Best of the Season Peter, to you and yours - and keep the updates coming. Norm.
  12. Oh, and by-the-way, the CF 100 was a CANADIAN aircraft (AVRO Canada - just in case anyone reading Clunk's post got the impression it was a British development) - AND it was a bloody beautiful aircraft - at least in my mind's eye. Perfectly suited for it's intended role of long-range interceptor, over some of the world's most desolate landscape. Take that, you men of failing style appreciation, you!! Norm.
  13. I've got to agree with most of the comments here. SAC products generally leave me scratching my head with the question "WHY" bouncing around inside. I must admit that I have little respect for a company that attempts to capitalise on our hunger to upgrade to aftermarket items, by providing "direct copies" of an existing product (with little or NO attempt to upgrade or detail said part) and then reproduce that copy in a medium that MAY provide more long term problems than the original. I see little evidence of this supplier doing much more than pressing existing kit parts into modelling clay and then pouring in inferior grade white metal to produce crude replicas of the original parts - the packaging probably cost him more than his "manufacturing" process. Norm.
  14. Ok, I'm NOT going to repeat myself, nor will I attempt to "outdo" comments made by others here, soooo... I will NOT tell you that you are doing a terrific job, I won't - NO you can't make me. So there! Norm.
  15. Kevin, I agree. What would also be interesting to know, is whether a kit's original gear was THAT prone to breakage. In other words, if increased detail is not a requirement to the purchaser, does the situation warrant the use of a stronger replacement (if, indeed, SAC gear is stronger)? Norm.
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