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VintageEagle

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  1. Like
    VintageEagle reacted to airscale in 1/18 P51C Mustang "Lopes Hope the 3rd"   
    ..back again with a bit more done...
     
    first the top canopy section was made as a plug and the boiling water process used to form PETG around it - here it is pretty much fully wrapping the mould..
     

     
    ..and with framing added inside & out..
     

     
    ..Steve at Model Monkey 3D printed the correct gunsight for me from the Don Lopez cockpit photo and it turned out brilliantly - added a few details and good to go..
     

     
    ..after painting, detailing & making the mount..
     

     
    ..mounted in position on the coaming..
     

     
    ..as this was now ready, I stopped working on the canopy and got on with fixing the coaming & windshield so I could start fairing in the sections & skin the fuselage - here the process has started at the front, and now P38 filler added at the back..
     

     
    ..I forgot to take pics of the shaping work, so next up is one of the fuselage skins at the rear.. I made up a template sheet as it has to fit on three edges, and once I had that I could translate the drawing rivet & hatch positions to the sheet..
     

     
    ..the finished sheet, with a bit of tube fitted at the rear for the mounting where I think a jig fits the fuselage for balancing & gun alignment etc..
     

     
    ..and the sheet fitted with the hatches & upper skin..
     

     

     
    ..as the airframe is now virtually complete in shape terms after 18 months, I couldn't resist an assembly shot to see how things were shaping up..
     

     

     

     

     
    ..thats it for now

    TTFN
    Peter
     
     
  2. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Fvdm in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, the cockpit has been married with the fuselage :-)
     
    The cover above the upper instrument panel was a bit tricky as it is not wide enough to fit into the slots on each fuselage side. I first tried to force it into place, but that did not really work and I then found out, the windshield would not have space anyways like that. The best way was to glue the front face to the backside of the gun compartment. It took me some glue and patience, but it did work finally. I'll be faster and more accurate with my 2nd Fw 190 that I am building. 
     
    The rear part of the cockpit tub was a bit too short. I had another Eduard cockpit I used for test fitting and that one was a bit longer. I assume it is due to shrinking of the resin parts over time. Anyways, the good thing is that the gap in the rear will be completely covered by the canopy and not visible at all. 
     
    I then started experimenting for the next part I am focusing on: the rudder. I was not happy with the way how Revell moulded the rudder and I sanded it to get a smooth surface. To add texture I used my Cricut machine to create masks. I tested it on a spare 190 fuselage. I applied the masks, then a layer of Mr. Surfacer, I then removed the masks and sanded the surface smooth. The original 190 rudder has some textile strips that were glued over the ribs. The surface is also a bit irregular along narrow stripes underneath the fabric covering (maybe glue?). I tested how 1) leaving the surface, 2) adding a decal stripe for some contour and 3) adding first a thin irregular line of putty (first masked the thin line, then added the putty) and on top of it a stripe of decals. I quite like the result and will go for it. The only thing I will do differently is to use a slightly thinner layer of Mr. Surfacer.
     
    Below are some photos I took with my smart phone. No fancy background.
     
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     
     
  3. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from D.B. Andrus in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, the cockpit has been married with the fuselage :-)
     
    The cover above the upper instrument panel was a bit tricky as it is not wide enough to fit into the slots on each fuselage side. I first tried to force it into place, but that did not really work and I then found out, the windshield would not have space anyways like that. The best way was to glue the front face to the backside of the gun compartment. It took me some glue and patience, but it did work finally. I'll be faster and more accurate with my 2nd Fw 190 that I am building. 
     
    The rear part of the cockpit tub was a bit too short. I had another Eduard cockpit I used for test fitting and that one was a bit longer. I assume it is due to shrinking of the resin parts over time. Anyways, the good thing is that the gap in the rear will be completely covered by the canopy and not visible at all. 
     
    I then started experimenting for the next part I am focusing on: the rudder. I was not happy with the way how Revell moulded the rudder and I sanded it to get a smooth surface. To add texture I used my Cricut machine to create masks. I tested it on a spare 190 fuselage. I applied the masks, then a layer of Mr. Surfacer, I then removed the masks and sanded the surface smooth. The original 190 rudder has some textile strips that were glued over the ribs. The surface is also a bit irregular along narrow stripes underneath the fabric covering (maybe glue?). I tested how 1) leaving the surface, 2) adding a decal stripe for some contour and 3) adding first a thin irregular line of putty (first masked the thin line, then added the putty) and on top of it a stripe of decals. I quite like the result and will go for it. The only thing I will do differently is to use a slightly thinner layer of Mr. Surfacer.
     
    Below are some photos I took with my smart phone. No fancy background.
     
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     
     
  4. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from LSP_Kevin in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, the cockpit has been married with the fuselage :-)
     
    The cover above the upper instrument panel was a bit tricky as it is not wide enough to fit into the slots on each fuselage side. I first tried to force it into place, but that did not really work and I then found out, the windshield would not have space anyways like that. The best way was to glue the front face to the backside of the gun compartment. It took me some glue and patience, but it did work finally. I'll be faster and more accurate with my 2nd Fw 190 that I am building. 
     
    The rear part of the cockpit tub was a bit too short. I had another Eduard cockpit I used for test fitting and that one was a bit longer. I assume it is due to shrinking of the resin parts over time. Anyways, the good thing is that the gap in the rear will be completely covered by the canopy and not visible at all. 
     
    I then started experimenting for the next part I am focusing on: the rudder. I was not happy with the way how Revell moulded the rudder and I sanded it to get a smooth surface. To add texture I used my Cricut machine to create masks. I tested it on a spare 190 fuselage. I applied the masks, then a layer of Mr. Surfacer, I then removed the masks and sanded the surface smooth. The original 190 rudder has some textile strips that were glued over the ribs. The surface is also a bit irregular along narrow stripes underneath the fabric covering (maybe glue?). I tested how 1) leaving the surface, 2) adding a decal stripe for some contour and 3) adding first a thin irregular line of putty (first masked the thin line, then added the putty) and on top of it a stripe of decals. I quite like the result and will go for it. The only thing I will do differently is to use a slightly thinner layer of Mr. Surfacer.
     
    Below are some photos I took with my smart phone. No fancy background.
     
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     
     
  5. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Lothar in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, the cockpit has been married with the fuselage :-)
     
    The cover above the upper instrument panel was a bit tricky as it is not wide enough to fit into the slots on each fuselage side. I first tried to force it into place, but that did not really work and I then found out, the windshield would not have space anyways like that. The best way was to glue the front face to the backside of the gun compartment. It took me some glue and patience, but it did work finally. I'll be faster and more accurate with my 2nd Fw 190 that I am building. 
     
    The rear part of the cockpit tub was a bit too short. I had another Eduard cockpit I used for test fitting and that one was a bit longer. I assume it is due to shrinking of the resin parts over time. Anyways, the good thing is that the gap in the rear will be completely covered by the canopy and not visible at all. 
     
    I then started experimenting for the next part I am focusing on: the rudder. I was not happy with the way how Revell moulded the rudder and I sanded it to get a smooth surface. To add texture I used my Cricut machine to create masks. I tested it on a spare 190 fuselage. I applied the masks, then a layer of Mr. Surfacer, I then removed the masks and sanded the surface smooth. The original 190 rudder has some textile strips that were glued over the ribs. The surface is also a bit irregular along narrow stripes underneath the fabric covering (maybe glue?). I tested how 1) leaving the surface, 2) adding a decal stripe for some contour and 3) adding first a thin irregular line of putty (first masked the thin line, then added the putty) and on top of it a stripe of decals. I quite like the result and will go for it. The only thing I will do differently is to use a slightly thinner layer of Mr. Surfacer.
     
    Below are some photos I took with my smart phone. No fancy background.
     
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     
     
  6. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Out2gtcha in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, the cockpit has been married with the fuselage :-)
     
    The cover above the upper instrument panel was a bit tricky as it is not wide enough to fit into the slots on each fuselage side. I first tried to force it into place, but that did not really work and I then found out, the windshield would not have space anyways like that. The best way was to glue the front face to the backside of the gun compartment. It took me some glue and patience, but it did work finally. I'll be faster and more accurate with my 2nd Fw 190 that I am building. 
     
    The rear part of the cockpit tub was a bit too short. I had another Eduard cockpit I used for test fitting and that one was a bit longer. I assume it is due to shrinking of the resin parts over time. Anyways, the good thing is that the gap in the rear will be completely covered by the canopy and not visible at all. 
     
    I then started experimenting for the next part I am focusing on: the rudder. I was not happy with the way how Revell moulded the rudder and I sanded it to get a smooth surface. To add texture I used my Cricut machine to create masks. I tested it on a spare 190 fuselage. I applied the masks, then a layer of Mr. Surfacer, I then removed the masks and sanded the surface smooth. The original 190 rudder has some textile strips that were glued over the ribs. The surface is also a bit irregular along narrow stripes underneath the fabric covering (maybe glue?). I tested how 1) leaving the surface, 2) adding a decal stripe for some contour and 3) adding first a thin irregular line of putty (first masked the thin line, then added the putty) and on top of it a stripe of decals. I quite like the result and will go for it. The only thing I will do differently is to use a slightly thinner layer of Mr. Surfacer.
     
    Below are some photos I took with my smart phone. No fancy background.
     
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     
     
  7. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Antonio Argudo in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, the cockpit has been married with the fuselage :-)
     
    The cover above the upper instrument panel was a bit tricky as it is not wide enough to fit into the slots on each fuselage side. I first tried to force it into place, but that did not really work and I then found out, the windshield would not have space anyways like that. The best way was to glue the front face to the backside of the gun compartment. It took me some glue and patience, but it did work finally. I'll be faster and more accurate with my 2nd Fw 190 that I am building. 
     
    The rear part of the cockpit tub was a bit too short. I had another Eduard cockpit I used for test fitting and that one was a bit longer. I assume it is due to shrinking of the resin parts over time. Anyways, the good thing is that the gap in the rear will be completely covered by the canopy and not visible at all. 
     
    I then started experimenting for the next part I am focusing on: the rudder. I was not happy with the way how Revell moulded the rudder and I sanded it to get a smooth surface. To add texture I used my Cricut machine to create masks. I tested it on a spare 190 fuselage. I applied the masks, then a layer of Mr. Surfacer, I then removed the masks and sanded the surface smooth. The original 190 rudder has some textile strips that were glued over the ribs. The surface is also a bit irregular along narrow stripes underneath the fabric covering (maybe glue?). I tested how 1) leaving the surface, 2) adding a decal stripe for some contour and 3) adding first a thin irregular line of putty (first masked the thin line, then added the putty) and on top of it a stripe of decals. I quite like the result and will go for it. The only thing I will do differently is to use a slightly thinner layer of Mr. Surfacer.
     
    Below are some photos I took with my smart phone. No fancy background.
     
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     
     
  8. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from D.B. Andrus in Hasegawa 1/32 FW-190D9   
    That looks absolutely stunning! I have a few questions:
     
    Before you painted the model, did you sand the surface to flatten the rivet bumps a bit or did you intentionally do this only after paint was on so that they become better visible?
     
    Did you use any type of mask for the camouflage pattern on the wings and the straight demarcation line on the engine cowlings and lower wings? I could imagine that it would be quite hard to achieve such a straight line without masking.
     
    Was the dark grey wash done with enamel over an acrylic clear coat? What paint / mixture did you use for the airbrush weathering and did you first seal the wash with a clear coat?
     
    Sorry for so many questions. I would love to learn from you and achieve a similar result.
     
    Cheers,
    Roger
  9. Like
    VintageEagle reacted to curiouslysophie in 1/32 Fw-190 F8   
    My Revell Fw-190 is finally at a point I’d call finished. This kit has hands every bit of aftermarket thrown at it, much to my chagrin at times. This is my first aircraft, I’m still learning the techniques, so I’m not 100% happy with everything. It’s all a learning process though! I used Vallejo Model Air paints and a pretty cheap airbrush, which resulted in a less than great paint job. I am swapping to MRP and a decent airbrush for my next project. This is a fictional late war aircraft, as I prefer to build that way, rather than try to precisely model a real aircraft.
     
    I have since taking the pictures realised that I’m missing the gear indicators on the wings, and that the machine gun hatch clamps should be on the body and not the hatch.
     
    Anyway, on to the pictures! Excuse the poor photo quality, I only have my phone to take pictures, my DSLR is broken sadly.
     
    Hope you enjoy!
     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  10. Like
    VintageEagle reacted to Bruce_Crosby in Mistel Combo   
    The Launch Dolly in the Dragon kit has one Walter 500Kg booster rocket, the Classic book says four.  So back to bribery and corruption, I gave Tim the Fly booster parts from the Ar-234 and he came up with this:
    Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr
     
    Then this - nice 3d printed parts:
    Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr
     
    I added the nose ring and the transit mounts:
    Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr
     
    And started drilling the holes that are all over the booster.  And realised I'd drilled in the wrong place.
    Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr
     
    Something like this?
    Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr
     
    Booster in primer.
    Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr
     
    And that's it so far.  I start painting the He-162 tomorrow, Tim is busy redrawing the boosters on his mega powerful computer.
     
    Hope you like it.
     
    Regards,
     
    Bruce Crosby (with Wunwinglow, AKA Tim Perry)
     
  11. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Antonio Argudo in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Thank you Antonio for these excellent photos. In these photos, the material looks slightly darker than the color I used. I may repaint it, but on the photos I took the color looks more brighter and more yellowish than in reality (probably due to the blue background). The Ta 152 cockpit had a relatively bright color (see below)
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

    I assume that the original color turned darker over time and that it was more of a linen color originally. 
  12. Like
    VintageEagle reacted to Vincent in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    That's an interesting picture of one of the french FW190 assembled after the war. Note the french AVIOREX modele 32 harness that was also used on the MS406 and De520 among other french fighters
  13. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Shiba in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, I completed the last part before I can close the fuselage and move on: the cover above the instrument panel. When I looked at wartime photos, I noticed that there are six nuts (2x3) visible on the top of the cover near the opening for the Revi 16B gunsight. These are not present on the Eduard cover. Therefore, I added them using Archer rivets. I used them for the first time and I must say they are great and it worked without a problem. I had to repeat the first attempt, but it was my own fault. After I painted the rivets, I applied tape on top of it when masking the leather frame. When I removed the tape, the rivets stuck to it and I had to start over again. But next time, I was more careful and it worked perfectly. I highlighted the nuts with a thin brush and used a dark grey wash.
     

    Fw 190 D-11 cockpit where nuts can be seen on both side of the Revi 16B
     

    Eduard part with Archer rivets on the left side and Revel part on the right side
     

    Completed cover
     

    Other side (slightly out of focus, but I am using an iPhone for the photos as I don't have a camera with a macro lens)
     
    Next step was to paint the leather (on later versions it was a synthetic material and not leather). I checked many references to decide what color to use. I found brown, black, dark grey, greenish grey, light grey and beige. The Ta 152 H that still exists today for example has a beige material. I found a photo of a Fw 190 A-8 that also had a very lightly colored material.
     

     
    The first aircraft I will complete is the Fw 190 A-8. I found a color photo of an aircraft that was only few aircraft apart from the subject that I plan to build and that one had a beige material:
     

     
    Therefore, I decided to paint it beige as well. It gives a bit of contrast and looks quite attractive. Finally, I painted the inside of the fuselage around the cockpit (RLM 66), exhaust area (black) and tail wheel (bare metal):
     

     
    That's it for now. I have some respect of the next step: joining the fuselage and cockpit. I don't know if it is better to attach cockpit and cover to one side first and then joining the fuselage. Or joining the fuselage first and then adding the cockpit from below. I'll see and then can only hope that I don't do a big mistake that will evaporate all my motivation on this build.
     
     
     
  14. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Shiba in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    I thought that anodizing can only be done with aluminium and not steel, but I am not expert.
     
    I continued to paint the fuselage inside. I left the inside bare metal. And I painted one fork in RLM 02 (looks darker in the photo than it actually does; this is for my Fw 190 A-8) and will paint another one in dark brown (this is for my Fw 190 F-8 White 48). Here is a comparison of the new position of the tail wheel assembly with is slightly more up in the fuselage. The difference is not huge, but it corresponds much better with most wartime photos I have seen of Fw 190s. 
     

  15. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Alain Gadbois in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Time flies. I cannot believe that I started this build in 2017. Anyways, the fuselage halves are finally complete. I have summarized below all the changes I made. One thing that took me a while to figure out was the correct position of the tail wheel. Built out of the box, it extends too far out of the fuselage. On 90%+ photos I have seen of wartime Fw 190 the tail wheel does not extend as much and therefore I have decided to reposition it. I finally decided to add a new pin-hole to have the required strength of the assembly. Also, on the Revell kit the fuselage near the tail wheel has a fictitious shape that I filled with CA and sanded smooth. But now everything is ready to add paint to the inside to then finally add the cockpit and close the fuselage halves. 
     

     

  16. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Alain Gadbois in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    So, riveting of both fuselage halves done for 2 fuselages. Now sanding and re-riveting before the halves can finally be joined. I filled the two hatches on the port side and also changed the height of the main foot rest as it was too tall. I will most likely also apply a thin primer layer to better see the surface quality once done with sanding & re-riveting. 
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

     
  17. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Alain Gadbois in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, I completed the last part before I can close the fuselage and move on: the cover above the instrument panel. When I looked at wartime photos, I noticed that there are six nuts (2x3) visible on the top of the cover near the opening for the Revi 16B gunsight. These are not present on the Eduard cover. Therefore, I added them using Archer rivets. I used them for the first time and I must say they are great and it worked without a problem. I had to repeat the first attempt, but it was my own fault. After I painted the rivets, I applied tape on top of it when masking the leather frame. When I removed the tape, the rivets stuck to it and I had to start over again. But next time, I was more careful and it worked perfectly. I highlighted the nuts with a thin brush and used a dark grey wash.
     

    Fw 190 D-11 cockpit where nuts can be seen on both side of the Revi 16B
     

    Eduard part with Archer rivets on the left side and Revel part on the right side
     

    Completed cover
     

    Other side (slightly out of focus, but I am using an iPhone for the photos as I don't have a camera with a macro lens)
     
    Next step was to paint the leather (on later versions it was a synthetic material and not leather). I checked many references to decide what color to use. I found brown, black, dark grey, greenish grey, light grey and beige. The Ta 152 H that still exists today for example has a beige material. I found a photo of a Fw 190 A-8 that also had a very lightly colored material.
     

     
    The first aircraft I will complete is the Fw 190 A-8. I found a color photo of an aircraft that was only few aircraft apart from the subject that I plan to build and that one had a beige material:
     

     
    Therefore, I decided to paint it beige as well. It gives a bit of contrast and looks quite attractive. Finally, I painted the inside of the fuselage around the cockpit (RLM 66), exhaust area (black) and tail wheel (bare metal):
     

     
    That's it for now. I have some respect of the next step: joining the fuselage and cockpit. I don't know if it is better to attach cockpit and cover to one side first and then joining the fuselage. Or joining the fuselage first and then adding the cockpit from below. I'll see and then can only hope that I don't do a big mistake that will evaporate all my motivation on this build.
     
     
     
  18. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from D.B. Andrus in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Thank you Antonio for these excellent photos. In these photos, the material looks slightly darker than the color I used. I may repaint it, but on the photos I took the color looks more brighter and more yellowish than in reality (probably due to the blue background). The Ta 152 cockpit had a relatively bright color (see below)
     
    Cheers, Roger
     

     

    I assume that the original color turned darker over time and that it was more of a linen color originally. 
  19. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from D.B. Andrus in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    D.B.,
     
    Thank you  I will try my best not to breach the rules!
     
    Cheers, Roger
  20. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Troy Molitor in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Here are some more photos.
     
    First, a photo of the tail wheel of 'White 48' when it was at Namur. You can see the very dark  color. Compare it to the black boots of the solider. (Source: Hideki Noro, LO+ST).:
     

     
    Another example of this dark tail wheel fork can be found on Fw 190 A-8 Yellow 8 captured at Ansbach (Source: http://www.354thpmfg.com/galleries_wwlouie_pt5.html):

     
     
    Then the photo of the recovered Fw 190 D-9 tail wheel fork from lake Schwerin (Source: http://www.daedalus-berlin.de/Fw190D9_fahrwerk.htm):
     

     
    And another example of such a dark brownish finish can be found on the Fw 190 at the Belgrad museum (unfortunately, I could only find a low quality shot; Source: http://axis.classicwings.com):
     

     
    I tend to believe that these dark looking forks were not painted, but had this dark brown metallic surface finish. I assume that it was some kind of protective layer that was electrochemically created, but I am not an expert on surface treatment technologies in WWII. 
     
    Any thoughts?
  21. Like
  22. Thanks
    VintageEagle reacted to Antonio Argudo in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    great job mate, these pics are  interesting, cheers

     


  23. Like
    VintageEagle reacted to D.B. Andrus in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Roger
     
    This is a Motivation Evaporation Free Zone - No MoEvap Allowed. It's in the rules.*
     
    Please proceed with your excellent build. 
     
    * - Not sure which rule book, but it still applies. 
     
    Cheers,
    D.B.
  24. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from LSP_Kevin in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, I completed the last part before I can close the fuselage and move on: the cover above the instrument panel. When I looked at wartime photos, I noticed that there are six nuts (2x3) visible on the top of the cover near the opening for the Revi 16B gunsight. These are not present on the Eduard cover. Therefore, I added them using Archer rivets. I used them for the first time and I must say they are great and it worked without a problem. I had to repeat the first attempt, but it was my own fault. After I painted the rivets, I applied tape on top of it when masking the leather frame. When I removed the tape, the rivets stuck to it and I had to start over again. But next time, I was more careful and it worked perfectly. I highlighted the nuts with a thin brush and used a dark grey wash.
     

    Fw 190 D-11 cockpit where nuts can be seen on both side of the Revi 16B
     

    Eduard part with Archer rivets on the left side and Revel part on the right side
     

    Completed cover
     

    Other side (slightly out of focus, but I am using an iPhone for the photos as I don't have a camera with a macro lens)
     
    Next step was to paint the leather (on later versions it was a synthetic material and not leather). I checked many references to decide what color to use. I found brown, black, dark grey, greenish grey, light grey and beige. The Ta 152 H that still exists today for example has a beige material. I found a photo of a Fw 190 A-8 that also had a very lightly colored material.
     

     
    The first aircraft I will complete is the Fw 190 A-8. I found a color photo of an aircraft that was only few aircraft apart from the subject that I plan to build and that one had a beige material:
     

     
    Therefore, I decided to paint it beige as well. It gives a bit of contrast and looks quite attractive. Finally, I painted the inside of the fuselage around the cockpit (RLM 66), exhaust area (black) and tail wheel (bare metal):
     

     
    That's it for now. I have some respect of the next step: joining the fuselage and cockpit. I don't know if it is better to attach cockpit and cover to one side first and then joining the fuselage. Or joining the fuselage first and then adding the cockpit from below. I'll see and then can only hope that I don't do a big mistake that will evaporate all my motivation on this build.
     
     
     
  25. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Antonio Argudo in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Cockpits done, now riveting!   
    Finally, I completed the last part before I can close the fuselage and move on: the cover above the instrument panel. When I looked at wartime photos, I noticed that there are six nuts (2x3) visible on the top of the cover near the opening for the Revi 16B gunsight. These are not present on the Eduard cover. Therefore, I added them using Archer rivets. I used them for the first time and I must say they are great and it worked without a problem. I had to repeat the first attempt, but it was my own fault. After I painted the rivets, I applied tape on top of it when masking the leather frame. When I removed the tape, the rivets stuck to it and I had to start over again. But next time, I was more careful and it worked perfectly. I highlighted the nuts with a thin brush and used a dark grey wash.
     

    Fw 190 D-11 cockpit where nuts can be seen on both side of the Revi 16B
     

    Eduard part with Archer rivets on the left side and Revel part on the right side
     

    Completed cover
     

    Other side (slightly out of focus, but I am using an iPhone for the photos as I don't have a camera with a macro lens)
     
    Next step was to paint the leather (on later versions it was a synthetic material and not leather). I checked many references to decide what color to use. I found brown, black, dark grey, greenish grey, light grey and beige. The Ta 152 H that still exists today for example has a beige material. I found a photo of a Fw 190 A-8 that also had a very lightly colored material.
     

     
    The first aircraft I will complete is the Fw 190 A-8. I found a color photo of an aircraft that was only few aircraft apart from the subject that I plan to build and that one had a beige material:
     

     
    Therefore, I decided to paint it beige as well. It gives a bit of contrast and looks quite attractive. Finally, I painted the inside of the fuselage around the cockpit (RLM 66), exhaust area (black) and tail wheel (bare metal):
     

     
    That's it for now. I have some respect of the next step: joining the fuselage and cockpit. I don't know if it is better to attach cockpit and cover to one side first and then joining the fuselage. Or joining the fuselage first and then adding the cockpit from below. I'll see and then can only hope that I don't do a big mistake that will evaporate all my motivation on this build.
     
     
     
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