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RichieB

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  1. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from GMK in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Finishing off the underside of the fuselage, the missile launchers have had some miniature magnets attached to allow the Aim-7s to be easily removed if required. Most of the early F-15s did not carry much in the way of weapons, usually an Aim-9J  training round, so these will probably be left bare but it would be quite nice to load her up just to see what it would be like! I also drilled out and thinned the inlets at the bottom of the photo to make them a little more to scale and adding some tubing on the other side to give a sense of depth to the intake.
     

     
    Similar magnets are placed on the front launchers, I've yet to add the distinctive C-shaped brace . The grills on the avionics access bay have been drilled out to add more depth and a PE grill placed behind for effect. More latches have been added and of course an abundance of rivets!
     

     
     

     
    I also purchased the grills and vents set for the F-15 from GTResin. They are designed for the Tamiya kit but they fit the Revell one just fine. This is the grill underneath the rear of the nose section and helps add a nice bit of depth to the piece. Just need to tidy up a few mistakes ...ahem....before moving on to the much more visible top surface of the fuselage. No pressure!
  2. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from johncrow in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Finishing off the underside of the fuselage, the missile launchers have had some miniature magnets attached to allow the Aim-7s to be easily removed if required. Most of the early F-15s did not carry much in the way of weapons, usually an Aim-9J  training round, so these will probably be left bare but it would be quite nice to load her up just to see what it would be like! I also drilled out and thinned the inlets at the bottom of the photo to make them a little more to scale and adding some tubing on the other side to give a sense of depth to the intake.
     

     
    Similar magnets are placed on the front launchers, I've yet to add the distinctive C-shaped brace . The grills on the avionics access bay have been drilled out to add more depth and a PE grill placed behind for effect. More latches have been added and of course an abundance of rivets!
     

     
     

     
    I also purchased the grills and vents set for the F-15 from GTResin. They are designed for the Tamiya kit but they fit the Revell one just fine. This is the grill underneath the rear of the nose section and helps add a nice bit of depth to the piece. Just need to tidy up a few mistakes ...ahem....before moving on to the much more visible top surface of the fuselage. No pressure!
  3. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from scvrobeson in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Finishing off the underside of the fuselage, the missile launchers have had some miniature magnets attached to allow the Aim-7s to be easily removed if required. Most of the early F-15s did not carry much in the way of weapons, usually an Aim-9J  training round, so these will probably be left bare but it would be quite nice to load her up just to see what it would be like! I also drilled out and thinned the inlets at the bottom of the photo to make them a little more to scale and adding some tubing on the other side to give a sense of depth to the intake.
     

     
    Similar magnets are placed on the front launchers, I've yet to add the distinctive C-shaped brace . The grills on the avionics access bay have been drilled out to add more depth and a PE grill placed behind for effect. More latches have been added and of course an abundance of rivets!
     

     
     

     
    I also purchased the grills and vents set for the F-15 from GTResin. They are designed for the Tamiya kit but they fit the Revell one just fine. This is the grill underneath the rear of the nose section and helps add a nice bit of depth to the piece. Just need to tidy up a few mistakes ...ahem....before moving on to the much more visible top surface of the fuselage. No pressure!
  4. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from Lothar in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Finishing off the underside of the fuselage, the missile launchers have had some miniature magnets attached to allow the Aim-7s to be easily removed if required. Most of the early F-15s did not carry much in the way of weapons, usually an Aim-9J  training round, so these will probably be left bare but it would be quite nice to load her up just to see what it would be like! I also drilled out and thinned the inlets at the bottom of the photo to make them a little more to scale and adding some tubing on the other side to give a sense of depth to the intake.
     

     
    Similar magnets are placed on the front launchers, I've yet to add the distinctive C-shaped brace . The grills on the avionics access bay have been drilled out to add more depth and a PE grill placed behind for effect. More latches have been added and of course an abundance of rivets!
     

     
     

     
    I also purchased the grills and vents set for the F-15 from GTResin. They are designed for the Tamiya kit but they fit the Revell one just fine. This is the grill underneath the rear of the nose section and helps add a nice bit of depth to the piece. Just need to tidy up a few mistakes ...ahem....before moving on to the much more visible top surface of the fuselage. No pressure!
  5. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from Anthony in NZ in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Finishing off the underside of the fuselage, the missile launchers have had some miniature magnets attached to allow the Aim-7s to be easily removed if required. Most of the early F-15s did not carry much in the way of weapons, usually an Aim-9J  training round, so these will probably be left bare but it would be quite nice to load her up just to see what it would be like! I also drilled out and thinned the inlets at the bottom of the photo to make them a little more to scale and adding some tubing on the other side to give a sense of depth to the intake.
     

     
    Similar magnets are placed on the front launchers, I've yet to add the distinctive C-shaped brace . The grills on the avionics access bay have been drilled out to add more depth and a PE grill placed behind for effect. More latches have been added and of course an abundance of rivets!
     

     
     

     
    I also purchased the grills and vents set for the F-15 from GTResin. They are designed for the Tamiya kit but they fit the Revell one just fine. This is the grill underneath the rear of the nose section and helps add a nice bit of depth to the piece. Just need to tidy up a few mistakes ...ahem....before moving on to the much more visible top surface of the fuselage. No pressure!
  6. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from Dutch Man in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Finishing off the underside of the fuselage, the missile launchers have had some miniature magnets attached to allow the Aim-7s to be easily removed if required. Most of the early F-15s did not carry much in the way of weapons, usually an Aim-9J  training round, so these will probably be left bare but it would be quite nice to load her up just to see what it would be like! I also drilled out and thinned the inlets at the bottom of the photo to make them a little more to scale and adding some tubing on the other side to give a sense of depth to the intake.
     

     
    Similar magnets are placed on the front launchers, I've yet to add the distinctive C-shaped brace . The grills on the avionics access bay have been drilled out to add more depth and a PE grill placed behind for effect. More latches have been added and of course an abundance of rivets!
     

     
     

     
    I also purchased the grills and vents set for the F-15 from GTResin. They are designed for the Tamiya kit but they fit the Revell one just fine. This is the grill underneath the rear of the nose section and helps add a nice bit of depth to the piece. Just need to tidy up a few mistakes ...ahem....before moving on to the much more visible top surface of the fuselage. No pressure!
  7. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from GMK in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Most of the previous work was a precursor to tackling the fuselage halves. Using a mix of rivet spacing/styles I used the reference works by Jake Melampy and Daco, plus a fair smattering of Chuck's build pictures, to try and work out what rivet detail would show on an early F-15B. Needless to say the bare metal back end needs a fair amount of detail adding. The black wash is from Flory models and being water based is easy to remove. It's a bit more rough and ready than the pin washes but it shows up rough surfaces well so looks like I've got a bit of polishing off to do!
     

    I redid the insert at the bottom of exhaust petals and added the fairly visible plate that sits around the prominent vents on the tail booms. The vents also have a guide vane down the middle so I had to add that with some thin plasti-card.

    In a fit of AMS I also removed the plastic engine oil vents which were a bit clunky and replaced them with brass tubing which I squashed to about the right shape and then added some plasti-card detail.  

     
    The JPS vent was a bit complicated to replicate so I just scored out the grill a bit more with a pin vice. The vents further up were drilled out and some PE mesh put behind the gap to add a bit of missing detail. The large black areas are where two additional NACA vents were located but these needed to be filled in. 

    I then scribed some latches on the door panels. Looks like I have some more work to do on sanding smooth the surface and removing some heavy handed sanding work!
    Oh and then there's the re-riveting of the holes I just filled in .....it seems never ending!
  8. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from Landrotten Highlander in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Finishing off the underside of the fuselage, the missile launchers have had some miniature magnets attached to allow the Aim-7s to be easily removed if required. Most of the early F-15s did not carry much in the way of weapons, usually an Aim-9J  training round, so these will probably be left bare but it would be quite nice to load her up just to see what it would be like! I also drilled out and thinned the inlets at the bottom of the photo to make them a little more to scale and adding some tubing on the other side to give a sense of depth to the intake.
     

     
    Similar magnets are placed on the front launchers, I've yet to add the distinctive C-shaped brace . The grills on the avionics access bay have been drilled out to add more depth and a PE grill placed behind for effect. More latches have been added and of course an abundance of rivets!
     

     
     

     
    I also purchased the grills and vents set for the F-15 from GTResin. They are designed for the Tamiya kit but they fit the Revell one just fine. This is the grill underneath the rear of the nose section and helps add a nice bit of depth to the piece. Just need to tidy up a few mistakes ...ahem....before moving on to the much more visible top surface of the fuselage. No pressure!
  9. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from F`s are my favs in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Most of the previous work was a precursor to tackling the fuselage halves. Using a mix of rivet spacing/styles I used the reference works by Jake Melampy and Daco, plus a fair smattering of Chuck's build pictures, to try and work out what rivet detail would show on an early F-15B. Needless to say the bare metal back end needs a fair amount of detail adding. The black wash is from Flory models and being water based is easy to remove. It's a bit more rough and ready than the pin washes but it shows up rough surfaces well so looks like I've got a bit of polishing off to do!
     

    I redid the insert at the bottom of exhaust petals and added the fairly visible plate that sits around the prominent vents on the tail booms. The vents also have a guide vane down the middle so I had to add that with some thin plasti-card.

    In a fit of AMS I also removed the plastic engine oil vents which were a bit clunky and replaced them with brass tubing which I squashed to about the right shape and then added some plasti-card detail.  

     
    The JPS vent was a bit complicated to replicate so I just scored out the grill a bit more with a pin vice. The vents further up were drilled out and some PE mesh put behind the gap to add a bit of missing detail. The large black areas are where two additional NACA vents were located but these needed to be filled in. 

    I then scribed some latches on the door panels. Looks like I have some more work to do on sanding smooth the surface and removing some heavy handed sanding work!
    Oh and then there's the re-riveting of the holes I just filled in .....it seems never ending!
  10. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from LSP_Kevin in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Most of the previous work was a precursor to tackling the fuselage halves. Using a mix of rivet spacing/styles I used the reference works by Jake Melampy and Daco, plus a fair smattering of Chuck's build pictures, to try and work out what rivet detail would show on an early F-15B. Needless to say the bare metal back end needs a fair amount of detail adding. The black wash is from Flory models and being water based is easy to remove. It's a bit more rough and ready than the pin washes but it shows up rough surfaces well so looks like I've got a bit of polishing off to do!
     

    I redid the insert at the bottom of exhaust petals and added the fairly visible plate that sits around the prominent vents on the tail booms. The vents also have a guide vane down the middle so I had to add that with some thin plasti-card.

    In a fit of AMS I also removed the plastic engine oil vents which were a bit clunky and replaced them with brass tubing which I squashed to about the right shape and then added some plasti-card detail.  

     
    The JPS vent was a bit complicated to replicate so I just scored out the grill a bit more with a pin vice. The vents further up were drilled out and some PE mesh put behind the gap to add a bit of missing detail. The large black areas are where two additional NACA vents were located but these needed to be filled in. 

    I then scribed some latches on the door panels. Looks like I have some more work to do on sanding smooth the surface and removing some heavy handed sanding work!
    Oh and then there's the re-riveting of the holes I just filled in .....it seems never ending!
  11. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from Landrotten Highlander in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Most of the previous work was a precursor to tackling the fuselage halves. Using a mix of rivet spacing/styles I used the reference works by Jake Melampy and Daco, plus a fair smattering of Chuck's build pictures, to try and work out what rivet detail would show on an early F-15B. Needless to say the bare metal back end needs a fair amount of detail adding. The black wash is from Flory models and being water based is easy to remove. It's a bit more rough and ready than the pin washes but it shows up rough surfaces well so looks like I've got a bit of polishing off to do!
     

    I redid the insert at the bottom of exhaust petals and added the fairly visible plate that sits around the prominent vents on the tail booms. The vents also have a guide vane down the middle so I had to add that with some thin plasti-card.

    In a fit of AMS I also removed the plastic engine oil vents which were a bit clunky and replaced them with brass tubing which I squashed to about the right shape and then added some plasti-card detail.  

     
    The JPS vent was a bit complicated to replicate so I just scored out the grill a bit more with a pin vice. The vents further up were drilled out and some PE mesh put behind the gap to add a bit of missing detail. The large black areas are where two additional NACA vents were located but these needed to be filled in. 

    I then scribed some latches on the door panels. Looks like I have some more work to do on sanding smooth the surface and removing some heavy handed sanding work!
    Oh and then there's the re-riveting of the holes I just filled in .....it seems never ending!
  12. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from blackbetty in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Most of the previous work was a precursor to tackling the fuselage halves. Using a mix of rivet spacing/styles I used the reference works by Jake Melampy and Daco, plus a fair smattering of Chuck's build pictures, to try and work out what rivet detail would show on an early F-15B. Needless to say the bare metal back end needs a fair amount of detail adding. The black wash is from Flory models and being water based is easy to remove. It's a bit more rough and ready than the pin washes but it shows up rough surfaces well so looks like I've got a bit of polishing off to do!
     

    I redid the insert at the bottom of exhaust petals and added the fairly visible plate that sits around the prominent vents on the tail booms. The vents also have a guide vane down the middle so I had to add that with some thin plasti-card.

    In a fit of AMS I also removed the plastic engine oil vents which were a bit clunky and replaced them with brass tubing which I squashed to about the right shape and then added some plasti-card detail.  

     
    The JPS vent was a bit complicated to replicate so I just scored out the grill a bit more with a pin vice. The vents further up were drilled out and some PE mesh put behind the gap to add a bit of missing detail. The large black areas are where two additional NACA vents were located but these needed to be filled in. 

    I then scribed some latches on the door panels. Looks like I have some more work to do on sanding smooth the surface and removing some heavy handed sanding work!
    Oh and then there's the re-riveting of the holes I just filled in .....it seems never ending!
  13. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from johncrow in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Most of the previous work was a precursor to tackling the fuselage halves. Using a mix of rivet spacing/styles I used the reference works by Jake Melampy and Daco, plus a fair smattering of Chuck's build pictures, to try and work out what rivet detail would show on an early F-15B. Needless to say the bare metal back end needs a fair amount of detail adding. The black wash is from Flory models and being water based is easy to remove. It's a bit more rough and ready than the pin washes but it shows up rough surfaces well so looks like I've got a bit of polishing off to do!
     

    I redid the insert at the bottom of exhaust petals and added the fairly visible plate that sits around the prominent vents on the tail booms. The vents also have a guide vane down the middle so I had to add that with some thin plasti-card.

    In a fit of AMS I also removed the plastic engine oil vents which were a bit clunky and replaced them with brass tubing which I squashed to about the right shape and then added some plasti-card detail.  

     
    The JPS vent was a bit complicated to replicate so I just scored out the grill a bit more with a pin vice. The vents further up were drilled out and some PE mesh put behind the gap to add a bit of missing detail. The large black areas are where two additional NACA vents were located but these needed to be filled in. 

    I then scribed some latches on the door panels. Looks like I have some more work to do on sanding smooth the surface and removing some heavy handed sanding work!
    Oh and then there's the re-riveting of the holes I just filled in .....it seems never ending!
  14. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from F`s are my favs in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    And so the application of hundreds and hundreds of rivet holes continues .....
    Having acquired a copy of the Daco F-15A book (which is superb by the way), I have come to realise that this bird is absolutely covered in the dam things. An element of artistic license will have to be applied in order to preserve sanity as in reality most are hard to see unless the aircraft in question has been heavily maintained or badly needs a paint job. To that aim I've adopted a 2-stage process where obvious rivets (like those on the base of the fin) are made a touch more prominent using a hand rivet tool whilst those usually obscured by paint are applied more subtly using a Rosie riveter tool. I've tried to follow the general lines of the aircraft but almost inevitably a fair degree is just what seems to look right. I've filled in the middle panel line on the central part of the fin as I believe his is just a solid piece of composite material (Boron?) and similar got rid of some spurious panel lines near the leading edge. I've also drilled out the light at the top rear of each fin ready for a light source.
     
     

     
    The tailplanes are a bit simpler but followed the same process. I also thinned the training edges of both control surfaces as they are a bit thick on the Revell kit.
     

     
    The panel lines are a bit wide on the Revell kit but I don't intend to use a very dark wash so shouldn't be that noticeable. I'm also trying to give the surfaces a more polished finish before priming as the Revell kit is a little rough. These have all been a little bit of a practise for the main event, which is both fuselage pieces, as quite a bit of work is required to lift the detail level on these items!
  15. Like
    RichieB reacted to bdthoresen in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Just read through this build so far, Richie. I am loving the work so far. I always wanted this kit in my younger days, but every time I would save up my lawn mowing money, the hobby store would not have one! You are doing a fine job with it. Please keep the updates coming!
     
    THOR    
  16. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from johncrow in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    And so the application of hundreds and hundreds of rivet holes continues .....
    Having acquired a copy of the Daco F-15A book (which is superb by the way), I have come to realise that this bird is absolutely covered in the dam things. An element of artistic license will have to be applied in order to preserve sanity as in reality most are hard to see unless the aircraft in question has been heavily maintained or badly needs a paint job. To that aim I've adopted a 2-stage process where obvious rivets (like those on the base of the fin) are made a touch more prominent using a hand rivet tool whilst those usually obscured by paint are applied more subtly using a Rosie riveter tool. I've tried to follow the general lines of the aircraft but almost inevitably a fair degree is just what seems to look right. I've filled in the middle panel line on the central part of the fin as I believe his is just a solid piece of composite material (Boron?) and similar got rid of some spurious panel lines near the leading edge. I've also drilled out the light at the top rear of each fin ready for a light source.
     
     

     
    The tailplanes are a bit simpler but followed the same process. I also thinned the training edges of both control surfaces as they are a bit thick on the Revell kit.
     

     
    The panel lines are a bit wide on the Revell kit but I don't intend to use a very dark wash so shouldn't be that noticeable. I'm also trying to give the surfaces a more polished finish before priming as the Revell kit is a little rough. These have all been a little bit of a practise for the main event, which is both fuselage pieces, as quite a bit of work is required to lift the detail level on these items!
  17. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from LSP_Kevin in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    And so the application of hundreds and hundreds of rivet holes continues .....
    Having acquired a copy of the Daco F-15A book (which is superb by the way), I have come to realise that this bird is absolutely covered in the dam things. An element of artistic license will have to be applied in order to preserve sanity as in reality most are hard to see unless the aircraft in question has been heavily maintained or badly needs a paint job. To that aim I've adopted a 2-stage process where obvious rivets (like those on the base of the fin) are made a touch more prominent using a hand rivet tool whilst those usually obscured by paint are applied more subtly using a Rosie riveter tool. I've tried to follow the general lines of the aircraft but almost inevitably a fair degree is just what seems to look right. I've filled in the middle panel line on the central part of the fin as I believe his is just a solid piece of composite material (Boron?) and similar got rid of some spurious panel lines near the leading edge. I've also drilled out the light at the top rear of each fin ready for a light source.
     
     

     
    The tailplanes are a bit simpler but followed the same process. I also thinned the training edges of both control surfaces as they are a bit thick on the Revell kit.
     

     
    The panel lines are a bit wide on the Revell kit but I don't intend to use a very dark wash so shouldn't be that noticeable. I'm also trying to give the surfaces a more polished finish before priming as the Revell kit is a little rough. These have all been a little bit of a practise for the main event, which is both fuselage pieces, as quite a bit of work is required to lift the detail level on these items!
  18. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from Stevepd in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    And so the application of hundreds and hundreds of rivet holes continues .....
    Having acquired a copy of the Daco F-15A book (which is superb by the way), I have come to realise that this bird is absolutely covered in the dam things. An element of artistic license will have to be applied in order to preserve sanity as in reality most are hard to see unless the aircraft in question has been heavily maintained or badly needs a paint job. To that aim I've adopted a 2-stage process where obvious rivets (like those on the base of the fin) are made a touch more prominent using a hand rivet tool whilst those usually obscured by paint are applied more subtly using a Rosie riveter tool. I've tried to follow the general lines of the aircraft but almost inevitably a fair degree is just what seems to look right. I've filled in the middle panel line on the central part of the fin as I believe his is just a solid piece of composite material (Boron?) and similar got rid of some spurious panel lines near the leading edge. I've also drilled out the light at the top rear of each fin ready for a light source.
     
     

     
    The tailplanes are a bit simpler but followed the same process. I also thinned the training edges of both control surfaces as they are a bit thick on the Revell kit.
     

     
    The panel lines are a bit wide on the Revell kit but I don't intend to use a very dark wash so shouldn't be that noticeable. I'm also trying to give the surfaces a more polished finish before priming as the Revell kit is a little rough. These have all been a little bit of a practise for the main event, which is both fuselage pieces, as quite a bit of work is required to lift the detail level on these items!
  19. Like
    RichieB reacted to MARU5137 in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Richie,
     
    EXEMPLARY work  and detailed updates..
     
     
    Riveting  work indeed.   pun intended..
     
    You are doing a SPLENDID  job. 
    keep it coming . 
     
    following with enthusiasm. 
     
    MARU 5137.
  20. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from Lothar in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    And so the application of hundreds and hundreds of rivet holes continues .....
    Having acquired a copy of the Daco F-15A book (which is superb by the way), I have come to realise that this bird is absolutely covered in the dam things. An element of artistic license will have to be applied in order to preserve sanity as in reality most are hard to see unless the aircraft in question has been heavily maintained or badly needs a paint job. To that aim I've adopted a 2-stage process where obvious rivets (like those on the base of the fin) are made a touch more prominent using a hand rivet tool whilst those usually obscured by paint are applied more subtly using a Rosie riveter tool. I've tried to follow the general lines of the aircraft but almost inevitably a fair degree is just what seems to look right. I've filled in the middle panel line on the central part of the fin as I believe his is just a solid piece of composite material (Boron?) and similar got rid of some spurious panel lines near the leading edge. I've also drilled out the light at the top rear of each fin ready for a light source.
     
     

     
    The tailplanes are a bit simpler but followed the same process. I also thinned the training edges of both control surfaces as they are a bit thick on the Revell kit.
     

     
    The panel lines are a bit wide on the Revell kit but I don't intend to use a very dark wash so shouldn't be that noticeable. I'm also trying to give the surfaces a more polished finish before priming as the Revell kit is a little rough. These have all been a little bit of a practise for the main event, which is both fuselage pieces, as quite a bit of work is required to lift the detail level on these items!
  21. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from MARU5137 in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    And so the application of hundreds and hundreds of rivet holes continues .....
    Having acquired a copy of the Daco F-15A book (which is superb by the way), I have come to realise that this bird is absolutely covered in the dam things. An element of artistic license will have to be applied in order to preserve sanity as in reality most are hard to see unless the aircraft in question has been heavily maintained or badly needs a paint job. To that aim I've adopted a 2-stage process where obvious rivets (like those on the base of the fin) are made a touch more prominent using a hand rivet tool whilst those usually obscured by paint are applied more subtly using a Rosie riveter tool. I've tried to follow the general lines of the aircraft but almost inevitably a fair degree is just what seems to look right. I've filled in the middle panel line on the central part of the fin as I believe his is just a solid piece of composite material (Boron?) and similar got rid of some spurious panel lines near the leading edge. I've also drilled out the light at the top rear of each fin ready for a light source.
     
     

     
    The tailplanes are a bit simpler but followed the same process. I also thinned the training edges of both control surfaces as they are a bit thick on the Revell kit.
     

     
    The panel lines are a bit wide on the Revell kit but I don't intend to use a very dark wash so shouldn't be that noticeable. I'm also trying to give the surfaces a more polished finish before priming as the Revell kit is a little rough. These have all been a little bit of a practise for the main event, which is both fuselage pieces, as quite a bit of work is required to lift the detail level on these items!
  22. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from MARU5137 in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Before any major assembling is done I decided to address one of the weaknesses of the Revell kit which is the lack of surface detail, specifically rivet detail. Now there is a fine line between too little and too much but in the right proportions it does add to the sense of scale and realism. The trick is to find a good reference (or three) and stop before it looks like the plane is made from nothing but rivets. Jake Melampy's F-15 book is a great start but for real detail you cannot beat the Chuck's epic walk through of his F-15C aggressor listed below:
     
    Tamiya F-15 Kicked Up a Notch
     
     I also had a few older F-15 references as I wasn't sure if the F-15A/B were different in panel line detail to the F-15C/D. Funnily enough the Revell kit follows the panel line details found in an old Squadron/Signals publication so not sure who copied who as the detail is slightly different to others, perhaps more recent! One thing is sure, this aircraft had a lot of rivet detail but not all of it would show up clearly as the photo (by me) below shows:
     

     
    Anyway, in keeping with my 80% mantra I'll change the panel lines if it's obvious and add detail where its relevant, so I've started the process with the wings. Now considering that there was the no rivet detail at all when I started, this kit is going to require hundreds if not thousands of these dam things. I'm desperately trying not to count them when I add them. While I was at it I also removed the wingtip slime lights and anti-collision/navigation lights - more of that later.

     
    Mostly done by hand using spacers marked on Tamiya masking tape, or the 1mm Rosie Riveter tool. Some of it may be too subtle so I'll probably need to go over the weaker lines again - what joy! This had better be worth it.
     

    The underneath area of the wing is generally poorly referenced but also rarely viewed on the model. Not sure about those panel lines at towards the trailing edge of the wing, are they for real or over-exaggerated rivet lines? While I was at it I also thinned the trailing edges of the wings as the are quite thick. Now working on the fuselage which has a whole load of additions and changes to be made - what fun! 
  23. Thanks
    RichieB got a reaction from MARU5137 in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Hi themongoose,
    EL tape was bought from an ebay company called elpanelandtape but there are others out there.
    Regards,
  24. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from F`s are my favs in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    And so to one of the first major steps of this project, assembling the cockpit section which also means constructing the cockpit lighting.
    As you can see from the picture below the front cockpit is the Aires F-15A resin version trimmed to fit, and the rear cockpit is the Revell one, somewhat adapted to F-15B standards.
    The placing of both was mainly through lots of dry-fitting and the use of plastic blocks to prop the cockpit up. Each of the main instruments in each cockpit was fed by an appropriately sized fibre optic and routed to one of 2 LEDs. I also added some additional lighting optics on the side instrument panels for a bit of artistic license.
    Each of the 4 sidewalls and the HUD was fed by a separate fibre optic and connected to a green LED to add some colour interest. The foil is to cut out stray lighting.
    Luckily this is all on 1/32 otherwise it would be a bit tight what with the EL tape lights in there as well.
     

     
    The hole to the right is for a vent which I cut out and replaced with a scratch built one to give it a bit more depth.
     

     
    Once all connections, both electrical and fibre optic, had been made I glued the two halves together. Key was to ensure the cockpits were level and of the correct height to allow the canopy to sit properly with the seats and pilots in.
     

     
    Quick test to make sure it all still works! The front cockpit dial detail is from Aires and has some great detail on the acetate sheet placed behind the PE. The Radar and RHWR were created in colour separately and printed onto acetate to give those displays more colour and detail. The Radar and RHWR displays in the rear cockpit were done similarly but the rear instruments are a mix-match of acetate dials from other kits and dials copied from cockpit jpegs and printed onto acetate. My preferred choice was to have been some decals for the cockpit dials but whilst they looked good, they did not let enough light through. I doubt any F-15 pilot would actually be able to fly of the gauges in the back but they do at least resemble a cockpit!     
     

     
    And one in the dark for effect.

     
    Quite glad the cockpit section has come together at last as it finally begins to take shape, might have to blank some of that excess light out though.
    That said, lots of work to do yet on the fuselage if the cockpit section is anything to go by!
    That's all for now but thanks for looking and wishing you all a Happy and Constructive New Year!
  25. Like
    RichieB got a reaction from MARU5137 in 1/32 Early F-15B Eagle - 58TTW   
    Another area that has been occupying my attention are the somewhat detail-anaemic pylons. The ones Revell supply are designed to have the Aim-9s stuck in place and have somewhat solid attachment points for the fuel tanks. In keeping with the rest of the kit there is also no rivet detail, in fact, no real detail at all as the photo below demonstrates. Clearly my 'that needs to be fixed right now' alarm was burning a vivid red so armed with some reference material I decided to have a go.
     

     
    The first fix was to remove the Aim-9 launchers from the main rails and replace them in toto. As my scratch building is not quite up to that standard yet, I nicked some nice ones from the Tamiya F-15C kit and also added small magnets so I can attach and remove the Aim-9s at will. The hardest part was to work out the magnetic polarity so I used the F-4E I had done previously to ensure they were all magnetised in the correct sense. I then add some bolt, hinge and latch detail using plastic rod, archer resin details and spare PE to lift the detail level. The rear of the pylon also received some small ball bearings to replace the somewhat vague plastic ones and of course some rivet detail was added.
     

     
    The underneath of the pylon where the fuel tank attachments was given a bit of a makeover by carving out the necessary spaces and backfilling with bits of plastic rod etc to make it look a bit more business like. I also added magnets to allow the fuel tanks to be removed as required. I ended up needing 3 to provide sufficient stability but tried to put them in places where the fuel tanks are naturally connected directly to the pylon. For those doing something similar, note that the early F-15s had different lugs and BRUs to the later models.
     

     
    The centreline pylon received similar attention but this photo also shows the lugs added made from plastic card and guitar string.
     

     
    The only snag with the kit so far is that incessant voice telling you that the Revell blandizer has been working overtime. This in turn leads to many, many evenings of fiddly bits and carpet huntings.It also tends to mean that it is difficult to look at any scrap material without wondering whether it could be used as a bit of plumbing or mechanical structure, let alone the steadily increasing collection of tools 'required' to manipulate them into the aforementioned work of detail art. It's a slippery slope! 
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