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Whitey

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  1. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from aircare84 in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  2. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Wackyracer in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  3. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Greif8 in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  4. Thanks
    Whitey got a reaction from Uncarina in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  5. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from billwinkes in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  6. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from williamj in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  7. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Panzerwomble in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  8. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Nighthawk Calling 1 in S H Tempest VI, a labor of love.   
    Tempestuous mate.
     
  9. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from JMcD in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  10. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Scotsman in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  11. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Johnny Cloud in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  12. Like
    Whitey reacted to MikeC in S H Tempest VI, a labor of love.   
    Very nicely done. 
     
    I like the attention to detail, in that weather conditions on the airfield in the early morning have caused condensation to form on the hood.
  13. Thanks
    Whitey got a reaction from JMcD in 1:32 VF-84 F-4J   
    Bad and mean and mighty unclean. Very nice indeed.
  14. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from KiwiZac in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  15. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Cheetah11 in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  16. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Kagemusha in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  17. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Dragon in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  18. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from mywifehatesmodels in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  19. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from CODY in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  20. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Jan_G in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  21. Like
    Whitey reacted to Nighthawk Calling 1 in S H Tempest VI, a labor of love.   
    I'm calling her done the more I fiddle with her something else gets snapped off, school boy error in the end by fitting the canopy to soon as the super glue that was used to attach the oxygen bottles must have needed more time to go off. MRP paints used first time using them and had no issues. 
     
     
     
  22. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from florin13 in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  23. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from kkarlsen in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  24. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from LSP_K2 in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
  25. Like
    Whitey got a reaction from Out2gtcha in Kitty Hawk 1/32 Kingfisher RAAF Antarctic Flight 1948   
    Here is my 1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher in the guise of RAAF A48-13, Antarctic Flight 1948.
     

     
    The RAAF operated 24 Kingfishers during WWII for seaplane training and coastal surveillance. Early in 1948 A48-13, resplendent in high visibility yellow paint was transported to Antarctica on Australia's first post-war expedition to Australian Antarctic Territory onboard an elderly HMAS Wyatt Earp. 55 hours flying was undertaken in Antarctic waters but the difficulty in launching and retrieving it from a small ship limited the use of the Kingfisher. The severe conditions and the bumps and scrapes from assembling and dismantling the aircraft had a huge impact on the paint surface. It took 5 hours to assemble the aircraft and to launch it and the same to retrieve and dismantle it on the small deck. It was assembled and dismantled 3 times during the voyage. With only limited availability for observation duties the Kingfisher was returned to Australia and stored for possible further use but was finally offered for disposal in 1953. It's fate afterwards is unknown.
     
    Kitty Hawk's Kingfisher is a really nice kit with lots of subtle detail and it looks the part in all examples I have seen built.
     
    There are some fiddly bits and poor instructions, but nothing that could not be overcome with some brain power and patience. The engine assembly, exhausts and mounts was one of the awkward parts in that it had to be all straight to ensure that the cowlings were able to put on properly.  The wing float attachment to the wings could be better engineered but at the end of build it is all there and looking the goods.
     

     
    The guns and associated paraphernalia was removed and some fine cigar box packing was trimmed to simulate floorboards and a working table in the rear cockpit.
     
    Eduard photoetch was also added to both the front and rear cockpits. Homemade springs were made for the pilot's seat adjustment.
     

     
    MRP Silver Primer was used over the entire airframe to and some hair spray in various areas to affect the extensive chipping present on the airframe, before spraying with SMS Trainer Yellow and paint ripped off several areas. It initially looked overdone so I then overpainted some of the chips to simulate corrosion control by the crew.
     
     
     
    EZI-Line was used for float rigging and aerials with some white paint to simulate the insulators. Aircraft serial number from Ronan Decals.
     

     
    This is the real thing on the water beside Wyatt Earp.
     

     
    I still have to make up the DF loop housing on the front panel of the rear canopy.
     

     

     
    Even the fin is offset to counteract the torque of the prop.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Overall a nice kit of a lovely aircraft with a unique history that was both challenging and enjoyable to build. 
     
    Thanks to my Queensland Copper mate for the loan of Red Roo Models' "Kingfishers of the Antipodes".
     
     
     
     
     
     
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