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WnW Pfalz D.IIIa Finished.


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#1 ericg

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 10:46 AM

Hi guys,

Whilst doing the usual `start something else whilst the paint dries on something else' trick, I decided to see what all the fuss over Wingnut Wings was about and I started one of the 17 (soon to be 19) Wingnut wings kits that I own.

The criteria was `single engine, single seat, some rigging and not overly wooden' for my introduction to this particular brand of model, so as not to complicate things and ease myself into what I imagined might possibly end up being rather addictive modelling.

Well... Addictive is certainly right! I have turned from a `jet only, for a while' guy into one that wants to populate a rather large display cabinet full of WW1 aircraft models type of guy, almost immediatley upon starting page 1 of the instruction manual of this beautiful model.

I have relied on the colour call out of the manufacturer of this kit almost exclusivley when painting and used Tamiya paints. I figure that the Wingnut guys may have taken the time to research the machine a little more than the unnamed model kit manufacturer that has been my staple diet of late and take comfort in the fact that I am building what can only be described as a cutting edge model that has been well researched and designed for abolsute accuracy and ease of construction. I have deliberately not filled in the ejector pin marks, as from what I have observed the designers of the kit have thought about where they will be located so as not to allow them to be seen.

Some sub-assemblies. Note I have not added a clear coat to the instrument panel faces, and that this is my first attempt at woodgrain!:

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All together with lots more detail to be added:

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The engine in just for fun:

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Edited by ericg, 04 January 2013 - 05:27 AM.

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#2 LSP_Kevin

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 12:26 PM

Great start Eric. Good to see you make a start on your WnW stash!

Kev

#3 Iain (32SIG)

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 02:25 PM

Brilliant start!

I'll be watching like glue - have only four Wingnut kits in the stash (with more I'd like to get) - but still very nervous of starting my first as I'm not sure I can do them justice.

Just acquired the Roland D.VIa and I keep opening the box to fondle the parts lovingly... :)

WNW kits really are a class act.

Iain

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#4 Uncarina

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 02:25 PM

Great job with the wood grain!

Cheers,

Tom

#5 Peterpools

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 04:39 PM

Eric
Super start. Looking forward to following along and picking up as many tips and techniques as I can
Peter :popcorn:

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#6 ericg

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:45 AM

I have glued all of the cockpit components together and added a bit of depth by appliing a wash and spraying some highlights, Next step will be to add a drop of clear to each instrument face to simulate glass.

The interesting part of this sub-assemblly for me has been the rigging. I used EZline for the first time on the control wires as per the instruction manual and can only say how impressed I am with its qualities. I had to devise a method of running the rigging trhough the holes at the rear cockpit bulkhead so they didn't touch the sides and this is the way I did it. By gluing some plastic rod to the back of the bulkhead and then pulling the EZline so that it just takes up the slack and then applying a small drop of superglue.

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#7 Out2gtcha

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:58 AM

Awesome job...............I really have to agree on the EZline. I used it for the first time for a few models aerial antennas and it worked so well in fact, that I dont think Ill ever use anything else for it. I havnt had the pleasure to use it for rigging any WWI stuff, but I do have a DV in teh stash atm and am 100% planning on acquiring a DH-2, and eventually an E III as well as a D VII but the Fokker really doenst have much rigging anyway.

Its a bit flat and can be twisted pretty bad if one istn paying attention, but its reaction to CA, paint and even water is exactly what you would want in a rigging material.

I took my SPAD to the club meeting and was "demonstrating" EZlines properties by taking its aerial antenna and pushing it all the way down on the fuse and letting it rebound on its own. Those guys are straight old-school stretched sprue guys (way better at that stuff than I am) and youd think they had just seensome futuristic space material..........lol

#8 LSP_Kevin

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:04 AM

From what I can gather, EZ-Line is basically the same material as knitting-in elastic, so if you can get hold of some of that, you could save yourself some money. I've used it before, and from all the descriptions, it has exactly the same properties as EZ-Line. That said, knitting-in elastic seems to be even more difficult to find here in Australia than EZ-Line!

Oh, great work Eric by the way.

Kev

#9 ericg

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:13 AM

Thanks for the advice about EZ line Kev. I have seen it debated elsewhere where there are other products that are available that are the same but cheaper. By the time I jump in my car and drive to the nearest knitting shop and home again my gas guzzling car would have burnt way more juice than the cost difference of getting it from Wingnut wings.. plus in a way I am supporting my hobby by buying from these guys, and I am buying exactly what they are recommending.... and in the case of my hobby, money is no object!

Eric.

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#10 LSP_Ron

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:27 AM

From what I can gather, EZ-Line is basically the same material as knitting-in elastic, so if you can get hold of some of that, you could save yourself some money. I've used it before, and from all the descriptions, it has exactly the same properties as EZ-Line. That said, knitting-in elastic seems to be even more difficult to find here in Australia than EZ-Line!

Oh, great work Eric by the way.

Kev


One difference is the Knitting one is white whereas the EZ-line is dark grey/Black

Ron

Oh and also nice work Eric, I just got this kit myself.

Ron

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#11 Out2gtcha

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:31 AM

One difference is the Knitting one is white whereas the EZ-line is dark grey/Black

Ron

Oh and also nice work Eric, I just got this kit myself.

Ron


Very true.
EZline also comes in white, as well as rust, old copper, and rope colors.

#12 LSP_Kevin

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:35 AM

Thanks for the advice about EZ line Kev. I have seen it debated elsewhere where there are other products that are available that are the same but cheaper. By the time I jump in my car and drive to the nearest knitting shop and home again my gas guzzling car would have burnt way more juice than the cost difference of getting it from Wingnut wings.. plus in a way I am supporting my hobby by buying from these guys, and I am buying exactly what they are recommending.... and in the case of my hobby, money is no object!

Eric.


Yep, fair enough too. There was a guy selling EZ-Line at Expo a couple of years back, and I was really shocked at how expensive it was (shocked enough not to buy any!). I haven't seen the price, but perhaps it's cheaper through Wingnut Wings. FWIW, I've never been able to find knitting-in elastic in a shop here in Melbourne, though it's available a few places online.

Kev

#13 LSP_Ron

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:44 AM

$16.oo for 30m with WnW's I didn't think that was to bad. 30m is close to 90 feet?

Ron

 

 

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#14 LSP_Kevin

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:55 AM

$16.oo for 30m with WnW's I didn't think that was to bad. 30m is close to 90 feet?


It's about 100 feet Ron. Knitting-in elastic can be had for US$3.59 for a 200m spindle.

Kev

#15 LSP_Ron

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 02:03 AM

It's about 100 feet Ron. Knitting-in elastic can be had for US$3.59 for a 200m spindle.

Kev


LOL I should know better, 30m or 100ft is a standard measure in my business, I wasn't using the old hat rack when I replied.

Knitting is much less expensive by the looks of it

Ron

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