Jump to content


100 years ago tonight.....


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_TimC_*

Guest_TimC_*
  • Guests

Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:27 AM

Titanic struck an iceberg in the Atlantic Ocean. At 0240 local time (I dno't know what time zone she was in so I just used local time for her position) she slipped beneath the waves spilling over 1500 men, women and children into the freezing Atlantic waters. Never forget what the arrogance of man reaps when he (collectively) flys in the face of Mother Nature.

My grandfather was born 1 year afterward. Me, I was born 50 years and 21 minutes after the disaster. I have a soft spot in my heart and mind for the ship, her crew and the passengers. It started shortly after Robert Ballard discovered the wreck in 1985 and gained momentum after James Cameron's blockbuster movie. Last year while in Las Vegas, my wife and I toured the Titanic exhibit at the Luxor. Very interesting, informative and at the same time extremely sad. They have a section of Titanic's hull on display and although just a small piece, it weighs over 25 tons and is massive in size.

#2 ssculptor

ssculptor

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,192 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Connecticut, USA

Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:13 PM

I find this interest in the Titanic interesting and perplexing. Personally, I just do not care. It is utterly meaningless to me. Man's arrogance, over confidence and stupidity have resulted in far greater loss in human life and property than this mere ocean liner. Look at World War One. Look at the American Civil War. Compared to things like that the Titanic is a mere pimple in human history.
Stephen
Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?
The Shadow knows!
Nyah hah hah hah hah.

#3 D Bellis

D Bellis

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,448 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SE CT, USA

Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:24 PM

This is interesting:


Visited the traveling Titanic exibit when it was at Foxwoods casino a few years ago with my wife and kids. Very worthwhile.

Personally, I just do not care. It is utterly meaningless to me.

Then why bother to post meaningless drivel in a thread about a topic that others obviously do have an interest in? :mental:

D
You can lead a person to information, but you can't make them think.

#4 Guest_TimC_*

Guest_TimC_*
  • Guests

Posted 15 April 2012 - 06:11 PM

Great video D, thanks for posting.

Stephen: IF you hadn't taken my statement out of context, omitted important terms and twisted the meaning a little, you might come up with a different opinion. War is NOT and I repeat NOT a result of mans arrogance with respect to Mother Nature. My statement is clear, consise and direct. Arguably, overconfidence can be added to the meaning of arrogance within the context of my statement but not stupidity. Harland and Wolff built a magnificent ship using all the best engineering and construction techniques available to them. If there were engineering blunders in her design and construction, they were certainly not a result of stupidity. Stupidity in any context, has absolutely nothing to do with this incident. Titanic was built strong, well and completely sound but in case you're lacking in understanding why I said "mans arrogance" I'm referring to the fact that the ship was touted as "unsinkable", a phrase coined by the press, not the shipbuilders or the White Star Line. This attitude permeated into almost everyone that came into contact with Titanic. The Titanic disaster was a direct result of the conditions of that night and the speed at which Titanic was traveling. Likewise, referring to the actions of the Captain and crew as stupid would also be unreasonable because although there may have been errors in judgement with respect to speed in the ice fields, the logic of the time held that they would see anything that was big enough to do the ship harm far enough away to avoid any sort of mishap. 20/20 hindsight may call this "stupid" but in so labeling those actions 100 years removed from the incident anyone who promotes such a label is just irresponsible and downright disrespectful.

My statement was narrowly constructed and confined to one event, one incident that occurred 100 years ago on the night of April 14/15, 1912. If you wish to debate my statement, please confine yourself to that particular event and/or the events that lead up to it. Making broad, sweeping statements about events prior to and subsequent out of context does not help your credibility. Neither does contradicting yourself when you say you find those interested in the Titanic "interesting" but that you "...do not care." That means, at some level, you are interested. Your posting in this thread seems to be evidence that you do, at some level, care. After all, you cared enough to write an observation and post it.

I need to edit my first post by saying that Titanic slipped beneath the waves at 2:20 am, April 15, 1912; 50 years and 41 minutes after the fact, I was born.... I was mistakenly under the impression that she sank at 02:40 when in fact it was 2 hour and 40 minutes between the time she hit the iceberg to the time she sank.

Edited by TimC, 15 April 2012 - 06:22 PM.


#5 LSP_Typhoonattack

LSP_Typhoonattack

    Senior Member

  • LSP Moderator
  • 11,096 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St louis, Mo

Posted 15 April 2012 - 09:39 PM

I started the large Academy Titanic (one of two I'll eventually model), about a year ago, intending to finish before now, but as with so many of my projects, it''s still not finished. A sad event to be sure, and I feel a sense of loss regarding that vessel that I cannot explain.

Kevin

I used to be indecisive;... now I'm not so sure.

 

In Progress: 1:24 Bf 109K-4

 

output_EfpzVh_zps33d09002.gif


#6 LSP_Ron

LSP_Ron

    Senior Member

  • LSP Moderator
  • 9,757 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cowtown - Canada

Posted 16 April 2012 - 12:58 AM

I've always been fascinated with Titanic but this last month I'm actually getting a little tired of the commercialized hype around this 100 year anniversary. Its gone from a tragic event to being memorialized into something purely of entertainment.

There were others that you do not hear much about.

The Empress of Ireland - 1000 lost
The Wilhelm Gustloff lost something like 9400 lost
The Lusitania was nearly 1100 lost

Ron



I always wait for the paper each morning. I look at the obituary column and if I'm not in it, I go to work.


#7 Guest_TimC_*

Guest_TimC_*
  • Guests

Posted 17 April 2012 - 04:09 AM

I think (and this is only my opinion) the fascination/hype with the Titanic is a result of:

1. The amount of press coverage it received. (I have no knowledge about the coverage of the three listed by Ron and this may prove to be a dead end).
2. The reputed "unsinkability" of the ship (also promoted by the press and subscribed to by many people)
3. The fact that it was the largest ship of its day (100 feet longer than Lusitania/Mauretania of the Cunard Line)
4. The fact that it was on its maiden voyage.
5. The people who were on board when she went down (John Jacob Aster, Benjamin Gugenheim and other wealthy Americans) This I think is the main reason why Titanic rose head and shoulders above the rest.
6. The contradicting testimony by survivors of how the ship went down (fuels curiousity)
7. The fact that the wreck was discovered in 1985 and has been being looted ever since (now with a multi-nation pact to protect the site)
8. The traveling exhibit by itself is a huge draw and generates interest (fueled by the previous 7 observations)
9. The human interest in the stories/sufferings of the survivors and victims.

I don't believe (but don't know for certain) any of the other shipwrecks you've mentioned were given the same amount of coverage/treatment and therefore take a back seat to Titanic. Even Britannic, Titanic's sister ship, doesn't even come close (lost in 1916 according to Wikipedia). Olympic, the eldest of the three, survived to be scrapped in 1935 (again according to Wikipedia)

Edited by TimC, 17 April 2012 - 04:10 AM.


#8 LSP_Typhoonattack

LSP_Typhoonattack

    Senior Member

  • LSP Moderator
  • 11,096 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St louis, Mo

Posted 17 April 2012 - 06:05 PM

I have to go with Tim on this one Ron. I think for myself, it may just be the fact that Titanic was on her maiden voyage that night, as well as the fact that it was one of the two largest ships of her type ever built at that time, as well as the most opulent. To lose five years work on a brand new ship in a single three hour period is just too sad.

Kevin

I used to be indecisive;... now I'm not so sure.

 

In Progress: 1:24 Bf 109K-4

 

output_EfpzVh_zps33d09002.gif


#9 Youngtiger1

Youngtiger1

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,670 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yuba City, California

Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:39 AM

Few days ago, I heard on K-love about one of the passenger aboard Titanic during her last voyage. The individuals name was Rev. John Harper.

The story went that this preacher swim from one person to another and asking them if they were saved. He swam to a young boy who was on top of a debris and the preacher ask the boy if he had accepted Christ as his savior and the boy reply no. The preacher took his is life vest and gave it to the boy and said you need this more than I do. Once, the preacher could not swim any longer he started to shout out loud saying "repent and be saved." After short period he too went down into he cold water. Out of all the people that were rescued that night from the cold water this young boy was among them and he went back to England and told everyone he about this true Hero of The Titanic!

Just thought I share this with you guys :)

Mike

http://www.blessedqu...echu/harper.htm

Mike Bhangu

 

Completed project: Trumpeter A-10A http://forum.largesc...&hl=youngtiger1 

WIP: Fisher RB-51 Unlimited Reno Racer http://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?showtopic=40066

"But blessed is the man who trusts in the LORD, whose confidence is in him. He will be like a tree planted by the water that sends out its roots by the stream. It does not fear when heat comes; its leaves are always green. It has no worries in a year of drought and never fails to bear fruit". (Jeremiah 17:7-8)

 

LSPGBSIGbanner25ppi_zpscba4ec83.jpg





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users