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Pre-Washed Panel Lines/Riveting


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#1 Nightrain

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 04:24 PM

In several threads I have seen what appears to be models in the sanding/filling stages of builds in which the panel lines have already had wash applied. I believe I understand the concept to be that you are able to check your work before painting and having to correct issues further down the line. I am  working on the HK B-17G (later will be an F as well), I haven't built many models at all so this was a definite trial by fire but I think it is pushing me and it's turning out better than I anticipated so here I am. Sanding/filling stage. I want to repair bad mold lines as well as self inflicted ones from joining parts. I suppose my question being is should I put a thin oil wash on the bare plastic or should I put down a clear coat to bare plastic first much like it would after paint? My only goal is to see the lines to check the work, and most likely more sanding/scribing/rivets to come. I will be painting this one aluminum and going back again with possible post shading and weathering. Would oil wash on bare plastic cause adhesion issues to enamel based metallics later down the line? Is this even a necessary step or are there other ways of catching things before paint? I know primer shows issues but I need as thin of finish as possible. Any and all ideas, criticisms and general chit-chat welcomed. I am going crazy worrying from step to step and probably over analyzing these steps. Thanks for reading.

 

David


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#2 DeanKB

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 05:03 PM

I think what you refer to is pre-shading, which is designed to accentuate the panel-lines after painting by giving them some "depth". Some people love pre-shading, others avoid it.

 

You will need to use a primer - or paint - of some sort to spot the seam lines and such. I'd not be concerned the primer would be too "thick", as it's a light coat just to spot bits that need work.

 

You can pretty much use anything to do that job, as long as it will be OK with your final enamel finish. I only paint acrylics, so I'm not sure what advice to give here, but I'm sure somebody else will chip in.


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#3 DeanKB

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 05:03 PM

By the way, that is one hell of a model to be working on as one of your first!!


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#4 Nightrain

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 05:38 PM

The preshading before paint I am familiar with. There was in particular one of the very heavily watched F-15 builds that seemed to put a wash on bare plastic ahead of all else. So many pages of those builds I had trouble finding it. It appeared to already have a wash in the fitting and gluing stage as well as sanding/finishing. Never saw this before but seemed like a good idea since I have a hard time distinguishing the panel lines and rivets while plastic is still bare and needing body work. As for the model being a doozy, I concur. It's my first model since I was a teen and I didn't even paint those back then so it's definitely pushed my comfort zone off a cliff. I knew the cost of the build would force me to try harder and diversify the box of tips/tricks. So far it's paying off. I simply see the level of build quality on this board which is stunning in many cases and I know it's a gradual thing but skilled peers make me want to raise my bar. Avoiding a disasterous crash and burn is my main concern now.
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#5 chuck540z3

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 08:18 PM

Hi,

The wash I used is Tamiya Panel Line Accent Color, which comes in a variety of colours but Black is used the most. I do this to check for scribing and riveting flaws during the build, with the added bonus that it also acts as a pre-shade before paint to allow some of this added detail to show through.

Hope this helps,
Chuck
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#6 ScanmanDan

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 12:43 PM

I use the exact same materials and methods as Chuck above. ( Thanks Chuck! ) I have used the Tamiya panel line wash over both bare plastic and primed plastic with equal success.  I find that any slop or excess wash can be removed with a cotton bud of paper towel wetted with a small amount of Humbrol enamel thinner.  If you are careful and light handed  with you paint application you don't need to reapply the wash after you spray your colour coats.


A day above ground is, in my opinion, a good day.  :D


#7 G-Man

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 03:27 AM

Primer will show all of your body work flaws, especially when it's wet. I use Mr. Surfacer 1200, works great.

ON THE BENCH: Eduard 1/32 Bf 109E7

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