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To rivet or not


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#1 mark31

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 04:50 PM

hello to you all

i have opend the box off my Fw190 several times and when i look at it and the scale drawings i have there are no rivets on the model  kit

So i know HGW produce sets wit positif rivets for the planes but i can also put them on by myself

 

Do you think its worth to do so

 

another example will be the P-47 from hasegawa also no rivets but the trumpeter one is full off them

 

so let me hear what you think about it

 

thanks Mark


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#2 ade rowlands

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:55 PM

I received the same kit in a trade last week and am pondering the same thing myself about the HGW set, im just not sure what would show through after a coat or 2 of paint after the effort of applying it, I admit too, the cost of the set adds a little to the issue for me as it's it cheap, granted it's not super expensive but it's £15-£20 I could have splashed on a different kit. The video I found on YouTube makes it look really simple but even on that I struggle to see much of the detail showing through after its painted. I do like the detail for the fabric elevators and rudder though.
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#3 Jennings Heilig

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 07:27 PM

It's a completely subjective choice.  If you want to do it, do it.  

 

 

Personally, I think it detracts from a model.  We have no way to reproduce what actual flush rivets look like on a scale model.  And about 99.9% of rivets are essentially invisible from more than a few feet away from a real airplane in most circumstances.


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"It's all part of the show..."


#4 alain11

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:02 PM

hi 

 I agree , it's a matter of taste . I always do it , if I have a good riveting drawing , that allow me some interesting weathering effects .......for flush rivets effects , take a look at Jay 's 109 ( Tucohoward ) , it's very convincing ..now , about positive rivets , take a look at the B17 "skin" ... million rise rivets  

Alain

 

for flush rivet 

JUW_00_Korneisen.jpg

 weathering effects got with the " rosi" 

710.jpg


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#5 ssculptor

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:51 PM

Well, let me tell you how we did it in Vulgaria one day during War 2. Our chief engineer, Herr Doktor Heinrich von Schtinkfinger, LS/MFT, decided one day that it would save a lot of construction and measuring time if we merely put one very large rivet in the middle of each wing.  So we did it to the Vulgarian StuporJunkor Ju-69z, which was a twin engine Stuka that has been stolen from the Luftwaffe and modified in our underground labs and factories.

Shortly thereafter our chief test pilot, CaptainLieutenant Morris Mishigas, loaded the plane with two of the deadly and oulawed cabbage gas bombs and attacked the Noxies who were attempting to breach our defenses in section 17. In the process a Noxie Me-109 attempted to defend the assault troops and attacked our Ju-69z StuporJunkor . 

In trying to evade the streams of machine gun and cannon bullets flying at our StuporJunkor Captain- Lieutenant Mishigas promptly fainted from fright and thereby forced the plane into a violent spin. The spin so overstressed the two large, heavy rivets so much that they popped off the wings. This lightened the aircraft to such an extent that it recovered from the spin, and soaring over the attacking Me-109 forced its wings to break off, thus forcing the Noxie to crash into Lake Tuchis. The violently spinning CapainLieutenant Mishigas's inert body was forced against the bomb release levers, releasing the two Cabbage Gas bombs, which subsequently fell into the attacking Noxi troops.  These soldiers were immediately rendered helpless by the odor of the noxious gases and fell into a deep swoon. 

CaptainLieutenant Mishigas recovered at this point and flew his plane back to the base, where he was hailed a hero, immediately promoted to the rank of ColonelLieutenant  and given a permanent desk job. 

The Noxie troops, including the pilot of the Me-109 who was fished out of the lake, were captured and taken to the underlake hospital where they recovered physically and were brainwashed to settle in Vulgaria and take on productive trades and professions in our fair country. 

The two giant rivets that fell out of the wings made such a splash in the lake you wouldn't believe in a million years!

© Stephen Auslender

 

P.S. If you wish to know more about that hidden Bulgarian country known as Vulgaria, you can purchase a copy of my novel, The Streamlined Locomotive, which is available on Kindle for a mere 99 cents (USD). The book is also available in many other countries through Kindle.

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#6 Peterpools

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:36 PM

I'm a Rosie the Riveter Guy and it works just fine. Fore raided rivets, Archer's look like the way to go.

Peter


0338ba3a-e311-4dab-8212-e3c738b97d5d_zps

 

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#7 Bryan

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:33 PM

I tend to like riveted models....depending on scale and what it is.  But it's definitely one of those "the more subtle the better" things.

 

It is true that in a 100% accurate scale sense, unless you are going really large scale flush rivets cannot be accurately duplicated.  But neither can panel lines and a host of other things that most scale models have.

 

Now I will just wait for this thread to get heated....seems like these always do.


Edited by Bryan, 20 March 2017 - 11:34 PM.


#8 Bill_S

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:49 PM

For what it's worth, I spent a lot of time with Rosie on my Beaufighter, and most of them disappeared under paint. Maybe I should have applied more pressure. I used a beading tool for the larger fasteners; those worked out well.


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#9 LSP_Kevin

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:57 PM

I generally prefer a rivet-free surface on my models, and usually don't add them if they're not already there. Ironically, the only model I've ever fully rivetted was a 1/48 Monogram Wildcat (converted to an FM-2), and I really liked the effect there:

 

rivets_comparison.jpg

 

Kev


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#10 alain11

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:54 AM

Kev: nice riveting job !! I think riveting on WWII planes gives '" life" ( if I dare to say) to the treated surface .....just compare before and after ........

Alain 



#11 cib2265

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 11:14 AM

Im still trying to find a decent video tutorial on how to use the HGW positive rivets...anyone out there help? 

 

Plus is it better to primer first, then the rivets, then base paint or what? :D 


Chris Becker, Sunshine Coast Australia

 

 


#12 mark31

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 11:17 AM

thank you all for the info 

Will think about it

 

Mark



#13 ade rowlands

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 11:49 AM

Im still trying to find a decent video tutorial on how to use the HGW positive rivets...anyone out there help?

Plus is it better to primer first, then the rivets, then base paint or what? :D

The video I referred to in my earlier post.

https://m.youtube.co...h?v=2b56iLjL0oo

Edited by ade rowlands, 21 March 2017 - 11:49 AM.

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#14 tucohoward

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:03 PM

We all know I like rivets. For me I like the impression of something assembled from pieces of metal. I like the beading tool because I don't want holes that hold too much of a dark wash and give you the spotted effect. It's a fine line between too subtle, where all that work can't be seen, and not subtle enough where it's too apparent.

Jay




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